Publications by authors named "Louise Riotte-Lambert"

11 Publications

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Foraging efficiency in temporally predictable environments: is a long-term temporal memory really advantageous?

R Soc Open Sci 2021 Sep 22;8(9):210809. Epub 2021 Sep 22.

Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

Cognitive abilities enabling animals that feed on ephemeral but yearly renewable resources to infer resources are available may have been favoured by natural selection, but the magnitude of the benefits brought by these abilities remains poorly known. Using computer simulations, we compared the efficiencies of three main types of foragers with different abilities to process temporal information, in spatially and/or temporally homogeneous or heterogeneous environments. One was endowed with a memory, which stores recent experience about the availability of the different food types. The other two were endowed with a or memory, which stores long-term temporal information about absolute times of these availabilities or delays between them, respectively. To determine the range of possible efficiencies, we also simulated a forager without temporal cognition but which simply targeted the closest and possibly empty food sources, and a perfectly prescient forager, able to know at any time which food source was effectively providing food. The , and foragers were far more efficient than the forager without temporal cognition in temporally predictable environments, and interestingly, their efficiencies increased with the level of temporal heterogeneity. The use of a long-term temporal memory results in a foraging efficiency up to 1.16 times better ( memory) or 1.14 times worse ( memory) than the use of a simple memory. Our results thus show that, for everyday foraging, a long-term temporal memory did not provide a clear benefit over a simple short-term memory that keeps track of the current resource availability. Long-term temporal memories may therefore have emerged in contexts where short-term temporal cognition is useless, i.e. when the anticipation of future environmental changes is strongly needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.210809DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8456140PMC
September 2021

Individual-Level Memory Is Sufficient to Create Spatial Segregation among Neighboring Colonies of Central Place Foragers.

Am Nat 2021 08 24;198(2):E37-E52. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

AbstractCentral place foragers often segregate in space, even without signs of direct agonistic interactions. Using parsimonious individual-based simulations, we show that for species with spatial cognitive abilities, individual-level memory of resource availability can be sufficient to cause spatial segregation in the foraging ranges of colonial animals. The shapes of the foraging distributions are governed by commuting costs, the emerging distribution of depleted resources, and the fidelity of foragers to their colonies. When colony fidelity is weak and foragers can easily switch to colonies located closer to favorable foraging grounds, this leads to space partitioning with equidistant borders between neighboring colonies. In contrast, when colony fidelity is strong-for example, because larger colonies provide safety in numbers or individuals are unable to leave-it can create a regional imbalance between resource requirements and resource availability. This leads to nontrivial space-use patterns that propagate through the landscape. Interestingly, while better spatial memory creates more defined boundaries between neighboring colonies, it can lower the average intake rate of the population, suggesting a potential trade-off between an individual's attempt for increased intake and population growth rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/715014DOI Listing
August 2021

Drivers of site fidelity in ungulates.

J Anim Ecol 2021 04 9;90(4):955-966. Epub 2021 Feb 9.

U.S. Geological Survey, Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA.

While the tendency to return to previously visited locations-termed 'site fidelity'-is common in animals, the cause of this behaviour is not well understood. One hypothesis is that site fidelity is shaped by an animal's environment, such that animals living in landscapes with predictable resources have stronger site fidelity. Site fidelity may also be conditional on the success of animals' recent visits to that location, and it may become stronger with age as the animal accumulates experience in their landscape. Finally, differences between species, such as the way memory shapes site attractiveness, may interact with environmental drivers to modulate the strength of site fidelity. We compared inter-year site fidelity in 669 individuals across eight ungulate species fitted with GPS collars and occupying a range of environmental conditions in North America and Africa. We used a distance-based index of site fidelity and tested hypothesized drivers of site fidelity using linear mixed effects models, while accounting for variation in annual range size. Mule deer Odocoileus hemionus and moose Alces alces exhibited relatively strong site fidelity, while wildebeest Connochaetes taurinus and barren-ground caribou Rangifer tarandus granti had relatively weak fidelity. Site fidelity was strongest in predictable landscapes where vegetative greening occurred at regular intervals over time (i.e. high temporal contingency). Species differed in their response to spatial heterogeneity in greenness (i.e. spatial constancy). Site fidelity varied seasonally in some species, but remained constant over time in others. Elk employed a 'win-stay, lose-switch' strategy, in which successful resource tracking in the springtime resulted in strong site fidelity the following spring. Site fidelity did not vary with age in any species tested. Our results provide support for the environmental hypothesis, particularly that regularity in vegetative phenology shapes the strength of site fidelity at the inter-annual scale. Large unexplained differences in site fidelity suggest that other factors, possibly species-specific differences in attraction to known sites, contribute to variation in the expression of this behaviour. Understanding drivers of variation in site fidelity across groups of organisms living in different environments provides important behavioural context for predicting how animals will respond to environmental change.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.13425DOI Listing
April 2021

Mobility and its sensitivity to fitness differences determine consumer-resource distributions.

R Soc Open Sci 2020 Jun 17;7(6):200247. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.

An animal's movement rate (mobility) and its ability to perceive fitness gradients (fitness sensitivity) determine how well it can exploit resources. Previous models have examined mobility and fitness sensitivity separately and found that mobility, modelled as random movement, prevents animals from staying in high-quality patches, leading to a departure from an ideal free distribution (IFD). However, empirical work shows that animals with higher mobility can more effectively collect environmental information and better sense patch quality, especially when the environment is frequently changed by human activities. Here, we model, for the first time, this positive correlation between mobility and fitness sensitivity and measure its consequences for the populations of a consumer and its resource. In the absence of consumer demography, mobility alone had no effect on system equilibria, but a positive correlation between mobility and fitness sensitivity could produce an IFD. In the presence of consumer demography, lower levels of mobility prevented the system from approaching an IFD due to the mixing of consumers between patches. However, when positively correlated with fitness sensitivity, high mobility led to an IFD. Our study demonstrates that the expected covariation of animal movement attributes can drive broadly theorized consumer-resource patterns across space and time and could underlie the role of consumers in driving spatial heterogeneity in resource abundance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsos.200247DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7353973PMC
June 2020

Environmental Predictability as a Cause and Consequence of Animal Movement.

Trends Ecol Evol 2020 02 5;35(2):163-174. Epub 2019 Nov 5.

Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

The impacts of environmental predictability on the ecology and evolution of animal movement have been the subject of vigorous speculation for several decades. Recently, the swell of new biologging technologies has further stimulated their investigation. This advancing research frontier, however, still lacks conceptual unification and has so far focused little on converse effects. Populations of moving animals have ubiquitous effects on processes such as nutrient cycling and seed dispersal and may therefore shape patterns of environmental predictability. Here, we synthesise the main strands of the literature on the feedbacks between environmental predictability and animal movement and discuss how they may react to anthropogenic disruption, leading to unexpected threats for wildlife and the environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2019.09.009DOI Listing
February 2020

Habitat-dependent movement rate can determine the efficacy of marine protected areas.

Ecology 2018 11;99(11):2485-2495

Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, 30602-2202, USA.

Theoretical studies of marine protected areas (MPAs) suggest that more mobile species should exhibit reduced local effects (defined as the ratio of the density inside vs. outside of the MPA). However, empirical studies have not supported the expected negative relationship between the local effect and mobility. We propose that differential, habitat-dependent movement (i.e., a higher movement rate in the fishing grounds than in the MPA) might explain the disparity between theoretical expectations and empirical results. We evaluate this hypothesis by building two-patch box and stepping-stone models and show that increasing disparity in the habitat-specific movement rates shifts the relationship between the local effect and mobility from negative (the previous theoretical results) to neutral or positive (the empirical pattern). This shift from negative to positive occurs when differential movement offsets recruitment and mortality differences between the two habitats. Thus, local effects of MPAs might be caused by behavioral responses via differential movement rather than by, or in addition to, reductions in mortality. In addition, the benefits of MPAs, in terms of regional abundance and fishing yields, can be altered by the magnitude of differential movement. Thus, our study points to a need for empirical investigations that disentangle the interactions among mobility, differential movement, and protection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2477DOI Listing
November 2018

Spatial memory shapes density dependence in population dynamics.

Proc Biol Sci 2017 Nov;284(1867)

Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, CNRS, Université de Montpellier, 1919 Route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

Most population dynamics studies assume that individuals use space uniformly, and thus mix well spatially. In numerous species, however, individuals do not move randomly, but use spatial memory to visit renewable resource patches repeatedly. To understand the extent to which memory-based foraging movement may affect density-dependent population dynamics through its impact on competition, we developed a spatially explicit, individual-based movement model where reproduction and death are functions of foraging efficiency. We compared the dynamics of populations of with- and without-memory individuals. We showed that memory-based movement leads to a higher population size at equilibrium, to a higher depletion of the environment, to a marked discrepancy between the global (i.e. measured at the population level) and local (i.e. measured at the individual level) intensities of competition, and to a nonlinear density dependence. These results call for a deeper investigation of the impact of individual movement strategies and cognitive abilities on population dynamics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.1411DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5719166PMC
November 2017

How memory-based movement leads to nonterritorial spatial segregation.

Am Nat 2015 Apr 10;185(4):E103-16. Epub 2015 Feb 10.

Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5175, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-Université de Montpellier 2, 1919 route de Mende, F-34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

Home ranges (HRs) are a remarkably common form of animal space use, but we still lack an integrated view of the individual-level processes that can lead to their emergence and maintenance, particularly when individuals are in competition for resources. We built a spatially explicit mechanistic movement model to investigate how simple memory-based foraging rules may enable animals to establish HRs and to what extent this increases their foraging efficiency compared to individuals that do not base foraging decisions on memory. We showed that these simple rules enable individuals to perform better than individuals using the most efficient strategy that does not rely on memory and drive them to spatially segregate through avoidance of resource patches used by others. This striking result questions the common assumption that low HR overlaps are indicators of territorial behavior. Indeed, it appears that, by using an information-updating system, individuals can keep their environment relatively predictable without paying the cost of defending an exclusive space. However, memory-based foraging strategies leading to HR emergence seem unable to prevent the disruptive effects of the arrival of new individuals. This calls for further research on the mechanisms that can stabilize HR spatial organization in the long term.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/680009DOI Listing
April 2015

Do naive juvenile seabirds forage differently from adults?

Proc Biol Sci 2013 Oct 7;280(1768):20131434. Epub 2013 Aug 7.

Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique, 79360 Villiers en Bois, France.

Foraging skills of young individuals are assumed to be inferior to those of adults. The reduced efficiency of naive individuals may be the primary cause of the high juvenile mortality and explain the deferment of maturity in long-lived species. However, the study of juvenile and immature foraging behaviour has been limited so far. We used satellite telemetry to compare the foraging movements of juveniles, immatures and breeding adult wandering albatrosses Diomedea exulans, a species where foraging success is positively influenced by the distance covered daily. We showed that juveniles are able to use favourable winds as soon as the first month of independence, but cover shorter distances daily and spend more time sitting on water than adults during the first two months after fledging. These reduced movement capacities do not seem to be the cause of higher juvenile mortality. Moreover, juveniles almost never restrict their movement to specific areas, as adults and immatures frequently do over shelf edges or oceanic zones, which suggest that the location of appropriate areas is learned through experience. Immatures and adults have equivalent movement capacities, but when they are central place foragers, i.e. when adults breed or immatures come to the colony to display and pair, immatures make shorter trips than adults. The long duration of immaturity in this species seems to be related to a long period of learning to integrate the foraging constraints associated with reproduction and central place foraging. Our results indicate that foraging behaviour of young albatrosses is partly innate and partly learned progressively over immaturity. The first months of learning appear critical in terms of survival, whereas the long period of immaturity is necessary for young birds to attain the skills necessary for efficient breeding without fitness costs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.1434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3757974PMC
October 2013

Periodicity analysis of movement recursions.

J Theor Biol 2013 Jan 26;317:238-43. Epub 2012 Oct 26.

Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, CNRS UMR5175, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

Many animals adaptively use their environments by adjusting how long and how often they use specific areas of their home range. Whereas questions about residence times have been addressed for a long time, the study of movement recursions has only recently received due interest. A key question concerns the potential periodicity of such recursions, as many potential drivers of movement behaviour such as light, climate or plant-herbivore interactions can be periodic. We propose here to build upon well-established Fourier and wavelet analyses to extract periodic patterns from time-series of presence/absence, arrival or departure from areas of interest, and introduce reliable null models for assessing the statistical significance of the periods detected. We provide an illustrative example which shows how an impala (Aepyceros melampus) expressed periodic use of the main open area of its home range. The significant periods found (12 h using arrival times; 24h, 7 days, and 30 days using presence/absence records) were consistent with a use of this area linked to predation and disturbance, as the area was used more at night, closer to dark moon, and during week-days. Our approach is a further step towards building up a wider analytical framework for the study of movement ecology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2012.10.026DOI Listing
January 2013

Differential movement and movement bias models for marine protected areas.

J Math Biol 2012 Mar 12;64(4):667-96. Epub 2011 Feb 12.

Department of Mathematics, University of Florida, Orlando, FL, USA.

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are promoted as a tool to protect overfished stocks and increase fishery yields. Previous models suggested that adult mobility modified effects of MPAs by reducing densities of fish inside reserves, but increasing yields (i.e., increasing densities outside of MPAs). Empirical studies contradicted this prediction: as mobility increased, the relative density of fishes inside MPAs (relative to outside) increased or stayed constant. We hypothesized that this disparity between theoretical and empirical results was the result of differential movement of fish inside versus outside the MPA. We, therefore, developed a model with unequal and discontinuous diffusion, and analyzed its steady state and stability. We determined the abundance in the fishing grounds, the yield, the total abundance and the log ratio at steady-state and examined their response to adult mobility (while keeping the relative inequity in the diffusion constant). Abundance in the fishing grounds and yield increased, while total abundance and log-ratio decreased, as mobility increased. These results were all qualitatively consistent with the previous models assuming uniform diffusivity. Thus, the mismatch between empirical and theoretical results must result from other processes or other forms of differential movement. Therefore, we modified our original model by assuming that species located on the boundary of the MPA will preferentially move towards the MPA. This localized movement bias model gives rise to steady state profiles that can differ radically from the profiles in the unbiased model, especially when the bias is large. Moreover, for sufficiently large bias values, the monotonicity of the four measures with increased mobility is reversed, when compared with our original model. Thus, the movement bias model reconciles empirical data and theoretical results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00285-011-0407-7DOI Listing
March 2012
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