Publications by authors named "Louise Hooimeijer"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Health and treatment outcomes of patients with hemophilia in the Netherlands, 1972-2019.

J Thromb Haemost 2021 Jun 12. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Introduction: We conducted six cross-sectional nationwide questionnaire studies among all patients with hemophilia in the Netherlands from 1972 until 2019 to assess how health outcomes have changed, with a special focus on patients >50 years of age.

Methods: Data were collected on patient characteristics, treatment, (joint) bleeding, joint impairment, hospitalizations, human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C infections, and general health status (RAND-36).

Results: In 2019, 1009 patients participated, of whom 48% had mild, 15% moderate, and 37% severe hemophilia. From 1972 to 2019, the use of prophylaxis among patients with severe hemophilia increased from 30% to 89%. Their median annual bleeding rate decreased from 25 to 2 bleeds. Patients with severe hemophilia aged <16 years reported joint impairment less often over time, but in those aged >40 years joint status did not improve. In 2019, 5% of all 1009 patients were positive for the human immunodeficiency virus. The proportion of patients with an active hepatitis C infection drastically decreased from 45% in 2001 to 2% in 2019 due to new anti-hepatitis C treatment options. Twenty-five percent had significant liver fibrosis even after successful therapy. Compared to the general male population, patients aged >50 years reported much lower scores on the RAND-36, especially on physical functioning.

Discussion/conclusion: Our study shows that increased use of prophylactic treatment and effective hepatitis C treatment have improved joint health and nearly eradicated hepatitis C infection in patients with hemophilia in the Netherlands. However, patients still suffer from hemophilia-related complications, especially patients aged >50 years.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.15424DOI Listing
June 2021

Paraneoplastic pemphigus associated with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after small bowel transplantation.

Pediatr Transplant 2021 Sep 20;25(6):e14023. Epub 2021 May 20.

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: PNP is a malignancy-associated autoimmune mucocutaneous syndrome due to autoantibodies against plakins, desmogleins, and other components of the epidermis and basement membrane of epithelial tissues. PNP-causing malignancies comprise mainly lymphoproliferative and hematologic neoplasms. PNP is extremely rare, especially in children.

Methods: Here, we present the first case of a child who developed PNP on a PTLD after small bowel transplantation because of a severe genetic protein-losing enteropathy.

Results: The patient in this case report had a severe stomatitis, striate palmoplantar keratoderma, and lichenoid skin lesions. In addition, she had marked esophageal involvement. She had lung pathology due to recurrent pulmonary infections and ventilator injury. Although we found no evidence of BO, she died from severe pneumonia and respiratory failure at the age of 12 years.

Conclusion: It is exceptional that, despite effective treatment of the PTLD, the girl survived 5 years after her diagnosis of PNP. We hypothesize that the girl survived relatively long after the PNP diagnosis due to strong T-cell suppressive treatments for her small bowel transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/petr.14023DOI Listing
September 2021

Age dependency of plasma vitamin B12 status markers in Dutch children and adolescents.

Pediatr Res 2021 Feb 11. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Vitamin B12 deficiency in children may be associated with (severe) neurological manifestations, therefore recognition is important. Diagnosing vitamin B12 deficiency in children is challenging. This study aimed to investigate plasma methylmalonic acid, holotranscobalamin, and total cobalamin in children 0-18 years of age and to estimate age-dependent reference intervals.

Methods: Plasma vitamin B12 markers were measured in collected plasma samples of 170 children 0-18 years visiting a local primary care laboratory. All had within-reference hemoglobin and MCV values. Pediatric plasma vitamin B12 biomarkers were measured and reference values were derived thereof.

Results: Plasma methylmalonic acid was higher in young children, in particular between 1 and 6 months of age; total cobalamin and holotranscobalamin were highest from 0.5 to 4 years and decreased till 10 years of age. Plasma holotranscobalamin was highly correlated with plasma total cobalamin; their ratio was independent of age. Plasma methylmalonic acid was slightly more related to total cobalamin than to holotranscobalamin. A large proportion of mainly young children would be misclassified when adult references are applied.

Conclusions: Pediatric reference values for cobalamin markers are necessary to allow for early recognition and monitoring of children suspect of (clinical) cobalamin deficiency.

Impact: We analyzed three plasma vitamin B12 status markers, i.e., total cobalamin, holotranscobalamin, and methylmalonic acid, in the plasma of 170 children 0-18 years of age and were able to derive reference intervals thereof. Recognition of vitamin B12 deficiency in children is important but challenging as pediatric reference intervals for plasma vitamin B12 status markers, particularly plasma holotranscobalamin, are not well described. We think that our results may help early recognition and monitoring of children suspect of (clinical) vitamin B12 deficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41390-021-01372-2DOI Listing
February 2021

Mortality, life expectancy, and causes of death of persons with hemophilia in the Netherlands 2001-2018.

J Thromb Haemost 2021 03 18;19(3):645-653. Epub 2020 Dec 18.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Background: Treatment of patients with hemophilia has advanced over the past decades, but it is unknown whether this has resulted in a normal life expectancy in the Netherlands.

Objective: This observational cohort study aimed to assess all-cause and cause-specific mortality in patients with hemophilia in the Netherlands between 2001 and 2018 and to compare mortality and life expectancy with previous survival assessments from 1973 onward.

Patients/methods: All 1066 patients with hemophilia who participated in a nationwide survey in 2001 were followed until July 2018.

Results: Information on 1031 individuals (97%) was available, of whom 142 (14%) deceased during follow-up. Compared with the general Dutch male population, mortality of patients with hemophilia was still increased (standardized mortality ratio: 1.4, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-1.7). Intracranial bleeding and malignancies were the most common causes of death. Estimated median life expectancy of patients with hemophilia was 77 years, 6 years lower than the median life expectancy of the general Dutch male population (83 years). Over the past 45 years, death rates of patients with hemophilia have consistently decreased, approaching the survival experience of the general population. Over the past decades, mortality due to human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus infections has decreased, death due to intracranial hemorrhages has increased, and death due to ischemic heart disease has remained consistently low over time.

Conclusions: Survival in patients with hemophilia in the Netherlands has improved over time but is still lower than that of the general population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jth.15182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7986360PMC
March 2021

Weight and height in children newly diagnosed with cancer.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015 02 30;62(2):269-273. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology Beatrix Children's Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: Although weight loss and lack of linear growth occur in children with cancer, growth history is not included in research that aims to determine nutritional status in children newly diagnosed with cancer. Therefore, this study aimed to determine weight loss and lack of linear growth in this patient group.

Procedure: Weight and height were recorded in 95 children (ages 1.5-10 years) at diagnosis and compared with data predicted from growth curves. Age, gender, type of malignancy, extent of disease, and prior weight and height were tested for their potential relation to differences between actual and predicted data.

Results: The incidence of undernutrition, based on z-scores for weight-for-age (WFA), height-for-age (HFA), and weight-for-height (WFH), was 2%, 4%, and 7%, respectively. Actual z-scores were lower than predicted z-scores. Differences between actual and predicted z-scores of <-0.5 standard deviation score (SDS) in WFA, HFA, or WFH were found in 25%, 23%, and 29% of the children, respectively. Children with advanced cancer had the highest risk of significant weight loss (<-0.5 SDS in WFA) (OR  = 3.45, P = 0.012) prior to diagnosis. Differences were unrelated to type of malignancy, age, gender, and weight and height prior to diagnosis.

Conclusions: At diagnosis, approximately 25% of the children showed a significant reduction in z-scores for weight-for-age, height-for-age, and weight-for-height. This reduction may indicate a deteriorated nutritional status. Therefore, assessment of growth history should be standard of care to ensure appropriate nutritional interventions and should be included in research that aims to evaluate nutritional status in children newly diagnosed with cancer. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:269-273. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.25301DOI Listing
February 2015

Endothelial damage in long-term survivors of childhood cancer.

J Clin Oncol 2013 Nov 23;31(31):3906-13. Epub 2013 Sep 23.

Cornelia A.J. Brouwer, Aleida Postma, H. Louise H. Hooimeijer, Andries J. Smit, Judith M. Vonk, Arie M. van Roon, Maarten P. van den Berg, Wil V. Dolsma, Joop D. Lefrandt, Margreet T.E. Bink-Boelkens, Nynke Zwart, Wim J.E. Tissing, Elisabeth G.E. de Vries, and Jourik A. Gietema, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Purpose: To evaluate the presence of vascular damage in long-term childhood cancer survivors (CCS) and sibling controls, and to evaluate the association between vascular damage parameters and cancer treatment and influence of cardiovascular risk factors.

Patients And Methods: Vascular assessment was performed in 277 adult CCSs (median age at diagnosis, 9 years; range, 0 to 20 years; median current age, 28 years; range, 18 to 48 years) treated with potentially cardiovascular toxic anticancer treatment (ie, anthracyclines, platinum, and/or radiotherapy [RT]). Measurements included carotid- and femoral-wall intima-media thickness (IMT), flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery by ultrasound, assessment of endothelial and inflammatory marker proteins (including tissue-type plasminogen activator [t-PA], plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 [PAI-I]), and cardiovascular risk factors. CCS assessments were compared with those of 130 sibling controls (median age, 26 years; range, 18 to 51 years).

Results: At a median of 18 years (range, 5 to 31 years) after treatment, carotid and femoral IMTs in CCSs were not different from those of controls. However, CCSs who received RT as part of their treatment regimen had increased carotid and femoral IMTs and higher t-PA and PAI-I levels, indicating vascular damage and persistent endothelial activation. Patients treated with RT to the neck or chest also had greater femoral IMT. Greater IMT was associated with presence of cardiovascular risk factors (eg, hypertension and overweight).

Conclusion: After potentially cardiovascular toxic anticancer treatment, CCSs who received RT showed signs of endothelial damage and an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile compared with controls. CCSs treated with localized RT had increased IMT outside the primary irradiation field. These abnormalities are probably involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular morbidity in CCSs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2012.46.6086DOI Listing
November 2013
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