Publications by authors named "Louis Boumans"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A new species of Nemoura Latreille (Plecoptera: Nemouridae) from Amur River Basin (South of the Russian Far East).

Zootaxa 2018 Sep 7;4472(1):153-164. Epub 2018 Sep 7.

Federal Scientific Center of the East Asia Terrestrial Biodiversity, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences (FSC EATB FEB RAS), Vladivostok, 690022, Russia..

Nemoura sirotskii sp. n. (Plecoptera, Nemouridae) is described as a new stonefly species from the tributary streams of Zeya Reservoir (Amur River Basin) in the south of the Russian Far East. Detailed descriptions and illustrations are provided for the larvae and adult specimens. The diagnostic characters distinguishing it from sympatric species N. arctica are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4472.1.8DOI Listing
September 2018

Ecological speciation by temporal isolation in a population of the stonefly (Plecoptera, Leuctridae).

Ecol Evol 2017 Mar 10;7(5):1635-1649. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

Natural History Museum University of Oslo Oslo Norway.

Stream dwelling invertebrates are ideal candidates for the study of ecological speciation as they are often adapted to particular environmental conditions within a stream and inhabit only certain reaches of a drainage basin, separated by unsuitable habitat. We studied an atypical population of the stonefly at a site in central Norway, the Isterfoss rapids, in relation to three nearby and two remote conspecific populations. Adults of this population emerge about a month earlier than those of nearby populations, live on large boulders emerging from the rapids, and are short-lived. This population also has distinct morphological features and was studied earlier during the period 1975-1990. We reassessed morphological distinctness with new measurements and added several analyses of genetic distinctness based on mitochondrial and nuclear sequence markers, as well as AFLP fingerprinting and SNPs mined from RAD sequences. The Isterfoss population is shown to be most closely related to its geographical neighbors, yet clearly morphologically and genetically distinct and homogeneous. We conclude that this population is in the process of sympatric speciation, with temporal isolation being the most important direct barrier to gene flow. The shift in reproductive season results from the particular temperature and water level regime in the Isterfoss rapids. The distinct adult body shape and loss of flight are hypothesized to be an adaptation to the unusual habitat. Ecological diversification on small spatial and temporal scales is one of the likely causes of the high diversity of aquatic insects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.2638DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5330929PMC
March 2017

A new species of Zwicknia Murányi (Plecoptera, Capniidae) from the French and Swiss Jura Mountains, the French Massif Central, and the French Middle Rhône Region.

Zootaxa 2016 Jun 8;4121(2):133-46. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Natural History Museum, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1172, Blindern, NO-0318 Oslo, Norway.; Email:

A new species of Zwicknia Murányi, Z. ledoarei sp. n., from the Jura Mountains of France and Switzerland, the French Massif Central, and the French Middle Rhône Region, is described on the basis of morphology and molecular methods. Information on the distribution and the ecological preferences of this new species is also provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4121.2.3DOI Listing
June 2016

PESI - a taxonomic backbone for Europe.

Biodivers Data J 2015 28(3):e5848. Epub 2015 Sep 28.

Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, Département Systématique & Evolution, UMR 7205 MNHN-CNRS-UPMC-EPHE, (ISyEB), Paris, France.

Background: Reliable taxonomy underpins communication in all of biology, not least nature conservation and sustainable use of ecosystem resources. The flexibility of taxonomic interpretations, however, presents a serious challenge for end-users of taxonomic concepts. Users need standardised and continuously harmonised taxonomic reference systems, as well as high-quality and complete taxonomic data sets, but these are generally lacking for non-specialists. The solution is in dynamic, expertly curated web-based taxonomic tools. The Pan-European Species-directories Infrastructure (PESI) worked to solve this key issue by providing a taxonomic e-infrastructure for Europe. It strengthened the relevant social (expertise) and information (standards, data and technical) capacities of five major community networks on taxonomic indexing in Europe, which is essential for proper biodiversity assessment and monitoring activities. The key objectives of PESI were: 1) standardisation in taxonomic reference systems, 2) enhancement of the quality and completeness of taxonomic data sets and 3) creation of integrated access to taxonomic information.

New Information: This paper describes the results of PESI and its future prospects, including the involvement in major European biodiversity informatics initiatives and programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3897/BDJ.3.e5848DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4609752PMC
October 2015

Two new species of Zwicknia Murányi, with molecular data on the phylogenetic position of the genus (Plecoptera, Capniidae).

Zootaxa 2014 May 29(3808):1-91. Epub 2014 May 29.

Department of Zoology, Hungarian Natural History Museum, Baross u. 13, H-1088 Budapest, Hungary.; Email:

Analyses of the nuclear DNA marker 28S confirm the distinctness of the recently erected stonefly genus Zwicknia Murányi 2014, which encompasses the species until recently referred to as 'Capnia bifrons.' Two new species are described and illustrated with line drawings: Z. westermanni Boumans & Murányi, sp. n. from Germany and France, and Z. komica Murányi & Boumans, sp. n. from the Komi Republic in northwestern Russia. The intersexual communication of the former species is described in detail.        A phylogenetic analysis of 87 sequences of the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) representing the six described European species of Zwicknia and outgroup taxa reveals large genetic distances within the species Z. rupprechti and Z. bifrons, while the haploclade including all specimens of the latter species also includes Z. acuta and Z. westermanni. The mitochondrial phylogeny is assumed not to represent the species phylogeny. In contrast, a phylogeny of the nuclear markers 28S and ITS reveals that Z. rupprechti and Z. westermanni are more closely related to each other than either is to Z. bifrons. This finding is in line with the drumming patterns of the former two species being relatively similar.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.3808.1.1DOI Listing
May 2014

Geographical patterns of deep mitochondrial differentiation in widespread Malagasy reptiles.

Mol Phylogenet Evol 2007 Dec 10;45(3):822-39. Epub 2007 Jul 10.

Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, Zoological Museum, University of Amsterdam, Mauritskade 61, 1092 AD Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Using sequences of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene, we reconstructed the phylogeography of six widely distributed Malagasy reptiles: two gekkonid lizard species, Phelsuma lineata and Hemidactylus mercatorius; two chameleons, the Calumma brevicorne complex, and Furcifer lateralis; and two skinks, Trachylepis gravenhorstii and Trachylepis elegans. Genetic differentiation among major haplotype lineages was high and in some cases indicates or confirms species status of the divergent populations. Maximum uncorrected sequence divergences were between 2.2% and 8.3% within the various species or species complexes. Haplotype lineages were exclusive to geographic regions, except in the commensal H. mercatorius where in three anthropogenic habitats coexistence of haplotype lineages was observed, possibly due to human translocation. The eastward flowing rivers Mangoro and Mananara may represent barriers to gene flow in the case of three species each. Some species sampled from humid eastern and arid western Madagascar showed no differentiation between populations from these two regions; instead the pattern observed was in several cases more concordant with a differentiation along a north-south axis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ympev.2007.05.028DOI Listing
December 2007
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