Publications by authors named "Lothar Lauterboeck"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of 'in air' freezing on post-thaw recovery of Callithrix jacchus mesenchymal stromal cells and properties of 3D collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

Cryobiology 2020 02 20;92:215-230. Epub 2020 Jan 20.

Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz University Hannover, Hannover, Germany.

Through enabling an efficient supply of cells and tissues in the health sector on demand, cryopreservation is increasingly becoming one of the mainstream technologies in rapid translation and commercialization of regenerative medicine research. Cryopreservation of tissue-engineered constructs (TECs) is an emerging trend that requires the development of practically competitive biobanking technologies. In our previous studies, we demonstrated that conventional slow-freezing using dimethyl sulfoxide (MeSO) does not provide sufficient protection of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) frozen in 3D collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffolds. After simple modifications to a cryopreservation protocol, we report on significantly improved cryopreservation of TECs. Porous 3D scaffolds were fabricated using freeze-drying of a mineralized collagen suspension and following chemical crosslinking. Amnion-derived MSCs from common marmoset monkey Callithrix jacchus were seeded onto scaffolds in static conditions. Cell-seeded scaffolds were subjected to 24 h pre-treatment with 100 mM sucrose and slow freezing in 10% MeSO/20% FBS alone or supplemented with 300 mM sucrose. Scaffolds were frozen 'in air' and thawed using a two-step procedure. Diverse analytical methods were used for the interpretation of cryopreservation outcome for both cell-seeded and cell-free scaffolds. In both groups, cells exhibited their typical shape and well-preserved cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts after thawing. Moreover, viability test 24 h post-thaw demonstrated that application of sucrose in the cryoprotective solution preserves a significantly greater portion of sucrose-pretreated cells (more than 80%) in comparison to MeSO alone (60%). No differences in overall protein structure and porosity of frozen scaffolds were revealed whereas their compressive stress was lower than in the control group. In conclusion, this approach holds promise for the cryopreservation of 'ready-to-use' TECs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cryobiol.2020.01.015DOI Listing
February 2020

Diabetic Pregnancy and Maternal High-Fat Diet Impair Mitochondrial Dynamism in the Developing Fetal Rat Heart by Sex-Specific Mechanisms.

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Jun 25;20(12). Epub 2019 Jun 25.

Environmental Influences on Health and Disease Group, Sanford Research, 2301 E 60th Street North, Sioux Falls, SD 57104, USA.

Infants born to diabetic or obese mothers are at greater risk of heart disease at birth and throughout life, but prevention is hindered because underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using a rat model, we showed that prenatal exposure to maternal diabetes and a high-fat diet caused diastolic and systolic dysfunction, myocardial lipid accumulation, decreased respiratory capacity, and oxidative stress in newborn offspring hearts. This study aimed to determine whether mitochondrial dynamism played a role. Using confocal live-cell imaging, we examined mitochondrial dynamics in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM) from four prenatally exposed groups: controls, diabetes, high-fat diet, and combination exposed. Cardiac expression of dynamism-related genes and proteins were compared, and gender-specific differences were evaluated. Findings show that normal NRCM have highly dynamic mitochondria with a well-balanced number of fusion and fission events. Prenatal exposure to diabetes or a high-fat diet impaired dynamism resulting in shorter, wider mitochondria. Mechanisms of impaired dynamism were gender-specific and protein regulated. Females had higher expression of fusion proteins which may confer a cardioprotective effect. Prenatally exposed male hearts had post-translational modifications known to impair dynamism and influence mitophagy-mediated cell death. This study identifies mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins as targetable, pathogenic regulators of heart health in offspring exposed to excess circulating maternal fuels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20123090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6627740PMC
June 2019

Improved in vitro models for preclinical drug and formulation screening focusing on 2D and 3D skin and cornea constructs.

Eur J Pharm Biopharm 2018 May 2;126:57-66. Epub 2017 Dec 2.

Technische Universität Braunschweig, Institut für Pharmazeutische Technologie, Mendelssohnstr. 1, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany; Technische Universität Braunschweig, Zentrum für Pharmaverfahrenstechnik, Franz-Liszt-Str. 35a, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany. Electronic address:

The present overview deals with current approaches for the improvement of in vitro models for preclinical drug and formulation screening which were elaborated in a joint project at the Center of Pharmaceutical Engineering of the TU Braunschweig. Within this project a special focus was laid on the enhancement of skin and cornea models. For this reason, first, a computation-based approach for in silico modeling of dermal cell proliferation and differentiation was developed. The simulation should for example enhance the understanding of the performed 2D in vitro tests on the antiproliferative effect of hyperforin. A second approach aimed at establishing in vivo-like dynamic conditions in in vitro drug absorption studies in contrast to the commonly used static conditions. The reported Dynamic Micro Tissue Engineering System (DynaMiTES) combines the advantages of in vitro cell culture models and microfluidic systems for the emulation of dynamic drug absorption at different physiological barriers and, later, for the investigation of dynamic culture conditions. Finally, cryopreserved shipping was investigated for a human hemicornea construct. As the implementation of a tissue-engineering laboratory is time-consuming and cost-intensive, commercial availability of advanced 3D human tissue is preferred from a variety of companies. However, for shipping purposes cryopreservation is a challenge to maintain the same quality and performance of the tissue in the laboratory of both, the provider and the customer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpb.2017.11.014DOI Listing
May 2018

Novel chitin scaffolds derived from marine sponge Ianthella basta for tissue engineering approaches based on human mesenchymal stromal cells: Biocompatibility and cryopreservation.

Int J Biol Macromol 2017 Nov 30;104(Pt B):1955-1965. Epub 2017 Mar 30.

Institute of Experimental Physics, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09599 Freiberg, Germany. Electronic address:

The extraordinary biocompatibility and mechanical properties of chitinous scaffolds from marine sponges endows these structures with unique properties that render them ideal for diverse biomedical applications. In the present work, a technological route to produce "ready-to-use" tissue-engineered products based on poriferan chitin is comprehensively investigated for the first time. Three key stages included isolation of scaffolds from the marine demosponge Ianthella basta, confirmation of their biocompatibility with human mesenchymal stromal cells, and cryopreservation of the tissue-like structures grown within these scaffolds using a slow cooling protocol. Biocompatibility of the macroporous, flat chitin scaffolds has been confirmed by cell attachment, high cell viability and the ability to differentiate into the adipogenic lineage. The viability of cells cryopreserved on chitin scaffolds was reduced by about 30% as compared to cells cryopreserved in suspension. However, the surviving cells were able to retain their differentiation potential; and this is demonstrated for the adipogenic lineage. The results suggest that chitin from the marine demosponge I. basta is a promising, highly biocompatible biomaterial for stem cell-based tissue-engineering applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2017.03.161DOI Listing
November 2017

Xeno-Free Cryopreservation of Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Stromal Cells from Callithrix jacchus.

Biopreserv Biobank 2016 Dec 7;14(6):530-538. Epub 2016 Sep 7.

Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover , Hannover, Germany .

In the previous decade, numerous biobanks were established and have created large markets for the storage of bioactive compounds, cells, and tissues for medical and diagnostic applications. For in vivo clinical and therapeutic purposes, it is critical to use well-defined and xeno-free components during cultivation, preservation, and transplantation of biological material. Safe and efficacious storage of bioactive molecules, cells, and tissues, without the addition of undefined medium components, minimizes risks of zoonotic disease transmission and is thus an essential and desirable prerequisite for biobanks. This gives rise to a need for well-characterized and serum-free freezing media for application in cryopreservation. For this purpose, cryobiological additives such as methylcellulose, poloxamer-188, and α-tocopherol, which have previously been shown to exhibit a cytoprotective activity, have been investigated for cryoprotection on stem cells. With this strategy, the application of fetal bovine serum (FBS) could be avoided and the concentration of toxic cryoprotective agents such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) could be reduced. Our results suggest that the viability, as well as the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity of the thawed bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal stem cells, could be maintained using a freezing medium without FBS consisting of methylcellulose, poloxamer, and α-tocopherol with only 2.5% DMSO (% v/v).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/bio.2016.0038DOI Listing
December 2016

Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

Mater Sci Eng C Mater Biol Appl 2016 Nov 26;68:143-152. Epub 2016 May 26.

Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover, Germany. Electronic address:

Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msec.2016.05.113DOI Listing
November 2016

Multipotent stromal cells derived from common marmoset Callithrix jacchus within alginate 3D environment: Effect of cryopreservation procedures.

Cryobiology 2015 Aug 14;71(1):103-11. Epub 2015 May 14.

Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 36, 30167 Hannover, Germany. Electronic address:

Multipotent stromal cells derived from the common marmoset monkey Callithrix jacchus (cjMSCs) possess high phylogenetic similarity to humans, with a great potential for preclinical studies in the field of regenerative medicine. Safe and effective long-term storage of cells is of great significance to clinical and research applications. Encapsulation of such cell types within alginate beads that can mimic an extra-cellular matrix and provide a supportive environment for cells during cryopreservation, has several advantages over freezing of cells in suspension. In this study we have analysed the effect of dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO, 2.5-10%, v/v) and pre-freeze loading time of alginate encapsulated cjMSCs in Me2SO (0-45 min) on the viability and metabolic activity of the cells after freezing using a slow cooling rate (-1°C/min). It was found that these parameters affect the stability and homogeneity of alginate beads after thawing. Moreover, the cjMSCs can be frozen in alginate beads with lower Me2SO concentration of 7.5% after 30 min of loading, while retaining high cryopreservation outcome. We demonstrated the maximum viability, membrane integrity and metabolic activity of the cells under optimized, less cytotoxic conditions. The results of this study are another step forward towards the application of cryopreservation for the long-term storage and subsequent applications of transplants in cell-based therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cryobiol.2015.05.001DOI Listing
August 2015