Publications by authors named "Liz Clark"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Developing a digital learning version of a mentorship training programme.

Br J Nurs 2018 Jan;27(2):82-86

Senior Lecturer, School of Health and Community Care, Leeds Beckett University.

This article describes the experience of one university team in developing, delivering and evaluating an online Nursing and Midwifery Council-approved mentorship programme for nurses and midwives who support pre-registration students in practice. Although the authors are confident of the quality of the educational provision, this article does not discuss this programme as an exemplar of best practice, but aims to share the learning gained from the experience of introducing a digital learning version of a mentorship course.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2018.27.2.82DOI Listing
January 2018

Support for mentors-an exploration of the issues.

Br J Nurs 2016 Nov;25(20):1095-1100

Senior Lecturer, School of Health and Community Studies, Leeds Beckett University.

Nursing and midwifery mentors are fundamental to the process of ensuring future practitioners are adequately prepared and supported during the practice element of their degrees. However, there is evidence to suggest that the infrastructure and support for the mentoring role is not always adequate. This article provides a review of some of the issues including the emotional labour associated with supporting pre-registration students, difficulties in accessing protected learning time for mentoring, and lack of supportive networks for mentors to develop within the role. The authors make recommendations on what is required to ensure that the mentor role is better acknowledged, supported and resourced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2016.25.20.1095DOI Listing
November 2016

Managers' role in maximising investment in continuing professional education.

Nurs Manag (Harrow) 2016 Feb;22(9):30-6

Jill Rogers Associates, Cambridge.

Healthcare organisations face the challenge of delivering care in increasingly complex environments. To do so they depend on competent professionals, and continuing professional education (CPE) plays a major part in ensuring that staff maintain and develop their knowledge and skills. However, there is limited evidence of the effect of CPE on healthcare outcomes, and an emphasis on outcomes has overlooked the contribution of the processes that underlie effective CPE. This article reports the results of a study that explored a range of stakeholders' perceptions of the processes that maximise the positive effects of CPE on practice. Analysis of results shows that CPE can help improve care when supported by positive organisational cultures, effective partnership working between stakeholders and supportive learning environments that enable individuals to maximise their learning. This article discusses how managers play a pivotal role in creating positive cultures in which CPE can flourish by being role models and change agents, ensuring organisational strategic objectives are aligned with personal development plans, and by working collaboratively with education colleagues to ensure that learning from CPE is embedded in practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/nm.22.9.30.s29DOI Listing
February 2016

The value of Master's degrees for registered nurses.

Br J Nurs 2015 Mar 26-Apr 8;24(6):328, 330, 332-4

Principal Lecturer.

The value of graduates in the nursing workforce has been recognised in the move to all-graduate preparation of pre-registration nurses in England ( Nursing and Midwifery Council, 2010 ). Increasingly, after registration continuing professional development programmes for nurses are being offered at Master's level. However, there is limited evidence of the relationship between postgraduate study and improved patient outcomes. Evidence that does exist suggests that nurses who engage in postgraduate study are more likely to have improved critical thinking and decision-making skills, demonstrate leadership qualities to empower them to challenge poor practice, and have the skills needed for advanced clinical practice roles. This article explores these issues and makes recommendations for further work in this area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2015.24.6.328DOI Listing
August 2015

Involving patients in the assessment of nursing students.

Nurs Stand 2014 Jul;28(47):37-41

Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds.

Enabling patients, service users and carers to participate in the education of students in the healthcare sector is widely espoused, both in the literature and by professional regulatory bodies. This article focuses on one aspect of this: the issue of patient involvement in the assessment of nursing students in the practice setting. The challenges and complexities that may arise are explored, and recommendations are made for further work in this area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ns.28.47.37.e8164DOI Listing
July 2014

A collaborative approach to support trainee sign-off mentors.

Nurs Stand 2012 Oct 17-23;27(7):44-7

Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Leeds Metropolitan University.

Supervising student practitioners remains an important part of the work of registered nurses, midwives and specialist community practitioners. The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) introduced sign-off mentors in 2006. Sign-off mentors are required to make decisions about whether a final placement student has achieved the required standards of proficiency for entry to the NMC register. Existing, experienced mentors who wish to become sign-off mentors must be supervised signing off final placement students on NMC-approved courses on at least three occasions by a practitioner with existing sign-off mentor status. This article describes a collaborative citywide approach to the preparation and support of sign-off mentors in Leeds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ns2012.10.27.7.44.c9360DOI Listing
December 2012

Role of multidetector computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of patients attending the rapid access chest pain clinic, The Scottish computed tomography of the heart (SCOT-HEART) trial: study protocol for randomized controlled trial.

Trials 2012 Oct 4;13:184. Epub 2012 Oct 4.

University of Edinburgh/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Chancellor's Building, 49 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 SU4, UK.

Background: Rapid access chest pain clinics have facilitated the early diagnosis and treatment of patients with coronary heart disease and angina. Despite this important service provision, coronary heart disease continues to be under-diagnosed and many patients are left untreated and at risk. Recent advances in imaging technology have now led to the widespread use of noninvasive computed tomography, which can be used to measure coronary artery calcium scores and perform coronary angiography in one examination. However, this technology has not been robustly evaluated in its application to the clinic.

Methods/design: The SCOT-HEART study is an open parallel group prospective multicentre randomized controlled trial of 4,138 patients attending the rapid access chest pain clinic for evaluation of suspected cardiac chest pain. Following clinical consultation, participants will be approached and randomized 1:1 to receive standard care or standard care plus ≥64-multidetector computed tomography coronary angiography and coronary calcium score. Randomization will be conducted using a web-based system to ensure allocation concealment and will incorporate minimization. The primary endpoint of the study will be the proportion of patients diagnosed with angina pectoris secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. Secondary endpoints will include the assessment of subsequent symptoms, diagnosis, investigation and treatment. In addition, long-term health outcomes, safety endpoints, such as radiation dose, and health economic endpoints will be assessed. Assuming a clinic rate of 27.0% for the diagnosis of angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease, we will need to recruit 2,069 patients per group to detect an absolute increase of 4.0% in the rate of diagnosis at 80% power and a two-sided P value of 0.05. The SCOT-HEART study is currently recruiting participants and expects to report in 2014.

Discussion: This is the first study to look at the implementation of computed tomography in the patient care pathway that is outcome focused. This study will have major implications for the management of patients with cardiovascular disease.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01149590.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1745-6215-13-184DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3667058PMC
October 2012

Roles and responsibilities of the student nurse mentor: an update.

Br J Nurs 2011 Aug 11-Sep 8;20(15):933-7

Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, UK.

Facilitating the learning of student nurses in the workplace is an integral role of the registered nurse. This article aims to provide an overview of the role and responsibilities of the mentor in supporting pre-registration nursing students in clinical practice. The professional obligations for the mentor to meet the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) standards (NMC, 2008a) will be explored, including the ongoing requirements to keep up to date in mentoring practices. Some of the challenges within the role will be identified, including the importance of recognizing and supporting the failing student. Recent changes to the preparation requirements for sign-off mentors will be discussed. The article concludes by presenting the potential benefits to both the individual and the practice placement provider.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2011.20.15.933DOI Listing
October 2011

Distance is no barrier.

Authors:
Liz Clark

Nurs Stand 2010 Nov 3-9;25(9):64

RCN/Open University Strategic Alliance.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ns2010.11.25.9.64.p4397DOI Listing
December 2010

Fitness to fly for passengers with cardiovascular disease.

Heart 2010 Aug;96 Suppl 2:ii1-16

Cardiac Department, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust, Barrack Road, Exeter EX25DW, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/hrt.2010.203091DOI Listing
August 2010

Professional development for registered nurses.

Nurs Stand 2009 Dec 16-2010 Jan 5;24(15-17):35-8

Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds.

There is increasing recognition that health professionals should engage in continuing professional development and lifelong learning. In addition, planned changes to pre-registration nurse education mean that many registered nurses are considering, or will consider, further academic study. This article aims to demystify academic terminology and provide practical guidance on preparing for and accessing higher education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/ns2009.12.24.15.35.c7438DOI Listing
March 2010

Degrees of confidence.

Authors:
Liz Clark

Nurs Older People 2009 Mar;21(2):23-25

Of The Open University- Royal College of Nursing Strategic Alliance.

This article explores how quality care has become a reality for older people in Lincoln and how continuing professional development (CPD) has made a real difference to patient care, and has supported the career development of two nurses working with older people at Lincoln County Hospital.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/nop.21.2.23.s16DOI Listing
March 2009

Process validation and screen reproducibility in high-throughput screening.

J Biomol Screen 2009 Jan;14(1):66-76

GlaxoSmithKline R&D Pharmaceuticals, Screening and Compound Profiling, Tres Cantos, Spain.

The use of large-scale compound screening has become a key component of drug discovery projects in both the pharmaceutical and the biotechnological industries. More recently, these activities have also been embraced by the academic community as a major tool for chemical genomic activities. High-throughput screening (HTS) activities constitute a major step in the initial drug discovery efforts and involve the use of large quantities of biological reagents, hundreds of thousands to millions of compounds, and the utilization of expensive equipment. All these factors make it very important to evaluate in advance of the HTS campaign any potential issues related to reproducibility of the experimentation and the quality of the results obtained at the end of these very costly activities. In this article, the authors describe how GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has addressed the need of a true validation of the HTS process before embarking in full HTS campaigns. They present 2 different aspects of the so-called validation process: (1) optimization of the HTS workflow and its validation as a quality process and (2) the statistical evaluation of the HTS, focusing on the reproducibility of results and the ability to distinguish active from nonactive compounds in a vast collection of samples. The authors describe a variety of reproducibility indexes that are either innovative or have been adapted from generic medical diagnostic screening strategies. In addition, they exemplify how these validation tools have been implemented in a number of case studies at GSK.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1087057108326664DOI Listing
January 2009

Clinical leadership: values, beliefs and vision.

Authors:
Liz Clark

Nurs Manag (Harrow) 2008 Nov;15(7):30-5

Open University-RCN Strategic Alliance, Faculty of Health and Social Care, The Open University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/nm2008.11.15.7.30.c6807DOI Listing
November 2008

Leading by example.

Authors:
Liz Clark

Nurs Manag (Harrow) 2008 Oct;15(6):12-5

OU-RCN Strategic Alliance.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/nm.15.6.12.s12DOI Listing
October 2008

Partners in practice.

Authors:
Liz Clark

Nurs Manag (Harrow) 2008 Jun;15(3):12-3

OU-RCN strategic alliance.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7748/nm.15.3.12.s15DOI Listing
June 2008

The Methodist Hospital CCU: a Beacon unit of excellence.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2005 Jun;17(2):149-54, x

The Methodist Hospital, 6565 Fannin F1003, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

This article features the Coronary Care Unit of The Methodist Hospital of Houston, Texas. This unit was one of the first Beacon Critical Care Units recognized by the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. This article focuses on how to achieve this award. The Coronary Care Unit nursing infrastructure is described, and specific unit examples are included.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccell.2005.03.001DOI Listing
June 2005

Rebasing the annual mid-year population estimates for England and Wales.

Popul Trends 2002 (109):9-14

The ONS produces mid-year population estimates annually, which are based on updating from the most recent census. Therefore, whenever results become available from a census, a new base is created for the population estimates. This has implications for historic series, which need to be revised to be consistent with both the past and the most recent census. This article describes the methodology that will be used for this rebasing of the mid-year population estimates following the availability of results from the 2001 Census. Census results also provide a unique opportunity to assess the accuracy of the population estimates that are based on the previous census and this article also describes the approach that will be taken to the assessment of accuracy.
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May 2003