Mrs. Lita Duraine, Biological and Materials Electron Microscopist - Univerisity of the Pacific and San Joaquin Delta - Certified Electron Microscopist

Mrs. Lita Duraine

Biological and Materials Electron Microscopist

Univerisity of the Pacific and San Joaquin Delta

Certified Electron Microscopist

Houston, Texas | United States

Main Specialties: Medical Genetics

Additional Specialties: TEM, SEM, EDS, Dispersive

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-7809-4479


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Mrs. Lita Duraine, Biological and Materials Electron Microscopist - Univerisity of the Pacific and San Joaquin Delta - Certified Electron Microscopist

Mrs. Lita Duraine

Biological and Materials Electron Microscopist

Introduction

My interests evolve around the support of our researchers, post docs, undergrads, and other collaborators in electron microscopy techniques for both biological and materials electron microscopy. Instruct people with samples dissection, tissue processing, embedding, sectioning and TEM or SEM examination. I have worked on a wide diversity of specimens from plants, mammals, fish, reptiles, insects, IC chips, replicas, examination of plastics and resins, and failure analysis on different metals. Currently I assist genomic researchers in studying Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s, and other debilitating neurological diseases. I have set-up professional microscopy labs for both NASA Ames Research Center in California, and for Boston Scientific/ Target Therapeutics. I also work as an EM lab consultant to other private companies. The extent of my microscopy experience ranges from and includes Transmission Electron and Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectrometry, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Ultra-microtomy, biological bench and microwave processing, step-polishing, sputter coating and other light microscopy technology. I’ve had the opportunity to work with JEOL, Leo, Hitachi, and Phillips transmission and scanning electron scopes, in addition to Thermo-Noran and EDAX energy dispersive systems and products. My curriculum includes 3 year coursework in the Pre-Pharmacy program from the University of the Pacific, and a Certification in Electron Microscopy from San Joaquin Delta Microscopy Technology Center under Dr. Judy Murphy.

Primary Affiliation: Univerisity of the Pacific and San Joaquin Delta - Houston, Texas , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


View Mrs. Lita Duraine’s Resume / CV

Education

Jun 2012
Microscopy Society of America
Cryo Microscopy Workshop
Special course for Cryo Microcopy
Aug 2009
Microscopy Society of America
Digital Imaging
Course for Digital Imaging
Jan 1999 - May 2001
San Joaquin Delta College
Certified Electron Microscopist
Electron Microscopy School
May 2001
SJDC Microscopy Center
Electron Microscopy
Certificate in Electron Microscopy
Sep 1995 - Aug 1998
University of the Pacific
3 yr toward 5 year- pH.D in Pharmacy
Pharmacy School
May 1995
University of the Pacific
Pre-Pharmacy
3 years toward Pre-Pharmacy pharm.D

Experience

Jan 2019
2018 JEOL Image of the Year
Winner
TEM Image of the Year
May 2018
JEOL Image of the Month- May
Winner
Recipient award
Feb 2018
JEOL Image of the Month- February
Winner
Recipient award
May 2017
JEOL Image of the Month- May
Winner
Recipient award.
Jul 2004 - May 2007
Boston Scientific Corp
Certified Electron Microscopist
Neurological Stent Research
Jul 2001 - May 2003
NASA Ames Research Center/ Science & Technology Corp
Certified Electron Microscopist
BioVIS Gravitational Research/ Electron Microscopy
Oct 2011
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Certified Electron Microscopist
Molecular and Human Genetics
May 2004
Lita Duraine Microscopy Consulting
CEO
Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopy

Publications

12Publications

275Reads

-Profile Views

179PubMed Central Citations

Pancreatic Cell Fate Determination Relies on Notch Ligand Trafficking by NFIA.

Cell Rep 2018 Dec;25(13):3811-3827.e7

Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, and Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Molecular and Cellular Biology Department, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; McNair Medical Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Notch is activated globally in pancreatic progenitors; however, for progenitors to differentiate into endocrine cells, they must escape Notch activation to express Neurogenin-3. Here, we find that the transcription factor nuclear factor I/A (NFIA) promotes endocrine development by regulating Notch ligand Dll1 trafficking. Pancreatic deletion of NFIA leads to cell fate defects, with increased duct and decreased endocrine formation, while ectopic expression promotes endocrine formation in mice and human pancreatic progenitors. NFIA-deficient mice exhibit dysregulation of trafficking-related genes including increased expression of Mib1, which acts to target Dll1 for endocytosis. We find that NFIA binds to the Mib1 promoter, with loss of NFIA leading to an increase in Dll1 internalization and enhanced Notch activation with rescue of the cell fate defects after Mib1 knockdown. This study reveals NFIA as a pro-endocrine factor in the pancreas, acting to repress Mib1, inhibit Dll1 endocytosis and thus promote escape from Notch activation.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S22111247183186
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2018.11.078DOI Listing
December 2018
26 Reads
7.207 Impact Factor

Ari-1 Regulates Myonuclear Organization Together with Parkin and Is Associated with Aortic Aneurysms.

Dev Cell 2018 04;45(2):226-244.e8

Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, BCM, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, BCM, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital (TCH), Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Neuroscience, BCM, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Nuclei are actively positioned and anchored to the cytoskeleton via the LINC (Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton) complex. We identified mutations in the Parkin-like E3 ubiquitin ligase Ariadne-1 (Ari-1) that affect the localization and distribution of LINC complex members in Drosophila. ari-1 mutants exhibit nuclear clustering and morphology defects in larval muscles. We show that Ari-1 mono-ubiquitinates the core LINC complex member Koi. Surprisingly, we discovered functional redundancy between Parkin and Ari-1: increasing Parkin expression rescues ari-1 mutant phenotypes and vice versa. We further show that rare variants in the human homolog of ari-1 (ARIH1) are associated with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, conditions resulting from smooth muscle cell (SMC) dysfunction. Human ARIH1 rescues fly ari-1 mutant phenotypes, whereas human variants found in patients fail to do so. In addition, SMCs obtained from patients display aberrant nuclear morphology. Hence, ARIH1 is critical in anchoring myonuclei to the cytoskeleton.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2018.03.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5920516PMC
April 2018
12 Reads
9.708 Impact Factor

WAC Regulates mTOR Activity by Acting as an Adaptor for the TTT and Pontin/Reptin Complexes.

Dev Cell 2016 Jan;36(2):139-51

Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Program in Structural and Computational Biology and Molecular Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2015.12.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4730548PMC
January 2016
27 Reads
9 Citations
9.710 Impact Factor

A TRPV channel in Drosophila motor neurons regulates presynaptic resting Ca2+ levels, synapse growth, and synaptic transmission.

Neuron 2014 Nov 30;84(4):764-77. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Department of Integrative Biology and Pharmacology, University of Texas School of Medicine, 6431 Fannin Street, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1250 Moursund Street, Suite N1125.14, Mailstop NR-1125, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate Programs in Cell and Regulatory Biology (CRB) and Neuroscience, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas School of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.09.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4254599PMC
November 2014
27 Reads
16 Citations
15.054 Impact Factor

The retromer complex is required for rhodopsin recycling and its loss leads to photoreceptor degeneration.

PLoS Biol 2014 Apr 29;12(4):e1001847. Epub 2014 Apr 29.

Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America; Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America; Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, United States of America; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America; Program in Structural and Computational Biology and Molecular Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America; Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001847DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4004542PMC
April 2014
25 Reads
19 Citations

Crag is a GEF for Rab11 required for rhodopsin trafficking and maintenance of adult photoreceptor cells.

PLoS Biol 2012 4;10(12):e1001438. Epub 2012 Dec 4.

Program in Developmental Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3514319PMC
May 2013
11 Reads
35 Citations

Drosophila neuroligin 2 is required presynaptically and postsynaptically for proper synaptic differentiation and synaptic transmission.

J Neurosci 2012 Nov;32(45):16018-30

Curriculum in Genetics and Molecular Biology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7545, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1685-12.2012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3508708PMC
November 2012
7 Reads
24 Citations
6.344 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Hugo J Bellen
Hugo J Bellen

Baylor College of Medicine

11
Shinya Yamamoto
Shinya Yamamoto

Baylor College of Medicine

7
Manish Jaiswal
Manish Jaiswal

Department of Neurosurgery, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India

7
Hector Sandoval
Hector Sandoval

Baylor College of Medicine

6
Ke Zhang
Ke Zhang

College of Chemistry

5
Wu-Lin Charng
Wu-Lin Charng

Baylor College of Medicine

5
Bo Xiong
Bo Xiong

Institute of Zoology

5
Vafa Bayat
Vafa Bayat

Baylor College of Medicine

4
Kuchuan Chen
Kuchuan Chen

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

4
Kartik Venkatachalam
Kartik Venkatachalam

University of Texas School of Medicine

4