Publications by authors named "Lisa J Schlueter"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Parental buffering in the context of poverty: positive parenting behaviors differentiate young children's stress reactivity profiles.

Dev Psychopathol 2020 12;32(5):1778-1787

Department of Psychology, University of Denver, CO, USA.

Experiencing poverty increases vulnerability for dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and compromises long-term health. Positive parenting buffers children from HPA axis reactivity, yet this has primarily been documented among families not experiencing poverty. We tested the theorized power of positive parenting in 124 parent-child dyads recruited from Early Head Start (Mage = 25.21 months) by examining child cortisol trajectories using five samples collected across a standardized stress paradigm. Piecewise latent growth models revealed that positive parenting buffered children's stress responses when controlling for time of day, last stress task completed, and demographics. Positive parenting also interacted with income such that positive parenting was especially protective for cortisol reactivity in families experiencing greater poverty. Findings suggest that positive parenting behaviors are important for protecting children in families experiencing low income from heightened or prolonged physiologic stress reactivity to an acute stressor.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954579420001224DOI Listing
December 2020

Distribution of progesterone receptor immunoreactivity in the midbrain and hindbrain of postnatal rats.

Dev Neurobiol 2008 Oct;68(12):1378-90

Department of Biological Sciences, Delaware State University, Dover, DE 19901, USA.

Nuclear steroid hormone receptors are powerful transcription factors and therefore have the potential to influence and regulate fundamental processes of neural development. The expression of progesterone receptors (PR) has been described in the developing forebrain of rats and mice, and the mammalian brain may be exposed to significant amounts of progesterone, either from maternal sources and/or de novo synthesis of progesterone from cholesterol within the brain. The present study examined the distribution of PR immunoreactive (PRir) cells within the midbrain and hindbrain of postnatal rats. The results demonstrate that PR is transiently expressed within the first 2 weeks of life in specific motor, sensory and reticular core nuclei as well as within midbrain dopaminergic cell groups such as the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area. Additionally, robust PRir was observed in cells of the lower rhombic lip, a transient structure giving rise to precerebellar nuclei. These results suggest that progestins and progesterone receptors may play a fundamental role in the postnatal development of numerous midbrain and hindbrain nuclei, including some areas implicated in human disorders. Additionally, these findings contribute to the increasing evidence that steroid hormones and their receptors influence neural development in a wide range of brain areas, including many not typically associated with reproduction or neuroendocrine function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dneu.20664DOI Listing
October 2008