Publications by authors named "Liqiu Zhao"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Protective effect of adult children's education on parental survival in China: Gender differences and underlying mechanisms.

Soc Sci Med 2021 Apr 3;277:113908. Epub 2021 Apr 3.

School of Labor and Human Resources, Renmin University of China, China. Electronic address:

This study investigates whether adult children's education has a protective effect on parental survival, using data from all waves (2010-2018) of the China Family Panel Studies. We exploited the exogenous temporal and geographical variations in the enforcement of the 1986 compulsory schooling laws in China to construct an instrumental variable (IV) for adult children's education. The IV estimates indicated that the law-induced higher education of adult children led to sizeable improvements in the likelihood of paternal survival, although it had no significant effect on maternal survival. The protective effect on paternal survival was mainly driven by better-educated daughters, while sons' education had only a modest positive effect on maternal survival. Further evidence suggested that such heterogeneity by the gender of adult children might mainly come through more informal caregiving from better-educated daughters to older fathers with a limited role played by financial support from adult children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2021.113908DOI Listing
April 2021

Do only children have poor vision? Evidence from China's One-Child Policy.

Health Econ 2018 07 23;27(7):1131-1146. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

School of Economics, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China and GEP China, Ningbo, China.

This paper examines whether only children have poor vision by exploiting the quasinatural experiment generated by the Chinese One-Child Policy. The results suggest that being an only child increases the incidence of myopia by 9.1 percentage points. We further investigate the mechanisms through which being an only child affects the myopia and find that only children, as the only hope in a household, receive higher expectations in terms of academic performance and future educational attainment and pressure to succeed in life from parents, which contribute to the increased myopia. We also find that the school quality of only children is significantly higher than that of non-only children. This study provides new insights into an important health consequence of One-Child Policy in China.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hec.3661DOI Listing
July 2018