Publications by authors named "Lino Mascarenhas"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Letter to the Editor concerning "HIPTCN: Prospective Observational Study of Hypocoagulated Head Trauma Patients with Normal Admission Computed Tomography Scan".

Authors:
Lino Mascarenhas

Acta Med Port 2021 Jul 15. Epub 2021 Jul 15.

Serviço de Neurocirurgia. Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho. Vila Nova de Gaia. Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.20344/amp.16655DOI Listing
July 2021

Necrotizing infundibulo-hypophysitis: case-report and literature review.

Br J Neurosurg 2021 Jun 21:1-4. Epub 2021 Jun 21.

Department of Neurosurgery, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia/Espinho, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal.

Purpose: We describe a rare case of histopathologic-proven necrotizing infundibulo-hypophysitis (NIH).

Clinical History: A 40-year-old female presented with coexistence of central diabetes insipidus and hypopituitarism. Imaging disclosed a thickened infundibulum and a diffusely enlarged pituitary mass with gadolinium rim enhancement pattern. Microsurgical endonasal transsphenoidal resection was performed. The presence of extensive liquefactive necrosis, surrounded by lymphoplasmocytic inflammatory infiltrate, allowed for the diagnosis of NIH. Follow-up cranial imaging 10 months after surgery showed no evidence of reappearance of the lesion. There was no progression to panhypopituitarism.

Conclusion: Surgery and histopathological confirmation are the key diagnostic feature in NIH. The current case is the fifth report of NIH and the first one with an indolent course and without progression to panhypopituitarism so far.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02688697.2021.1940857DOI Listing
June 2021

Letter to the Editor Regarding "First Report of Traumatic Brain Injury in Luanda, Angola".

Authors:
Lino Mascarenhas

World Neurosurg 2020 12;144:333

Serviço de Neurocirurgia, Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia Espinho, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.08.194DOI Listing
December 2020

[On the Need to Promote the Primary Prevention of Head Injury].

Authors:
Lino Mascarenhas

Acta Med Port 2020 Mar 2;33(3):213-214. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Serviço de Neurocirurgia. Centro Hospitalar de Vila Nova de Gaia-Espinho. Vila Nova de Gaia. Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.20344/amp.13241DOI Listing
March 2020

Endoscopic endonasal clip ligation of cerebral aneurysms: an anatomical feasibility study and future directions.

J Neurosurg 2016 Feb 31;124(2):463-8. Epub 2015 Jul 31.

Departments of 1 Neurosurgery.

Objective: The expansion of endovascular procedures for obliteration of cerebral aneurysms highlights one of the drawbacks of clip ligation through the transcranial route, namely brain retraction or brain transgression. Sporadic case reports have emerged over the past 10 years describing endonasal endoscopic clip ligation of cerebral aneurysms. The authors present a detailed anatomical study to evaluate the feasibility of an endoscopic endonasal approach for application of aneurysm clips.

Methods: Nine human cadaveric head specimens were used to evaluate operative exposures for clip ligation of aneurysms in feasible anterior and posterior circulation locations. Measurements of trajectories were completed using a navigation system to calculate skull base craniectomy size, corridor space, and the surgeon's ability to gain proximal and distal control of parent vessels.

Results: In each of the 9 cadaveric heads, excellent exposure of the target vessels was achieved. The transplanum, transtuberculum, and transcavernous approaches were used to explore the feasibility of anterior circulation access. Application of aneurysm clips was readily possible to the ophthalmic artery, A1 and A2 segments of the anterior cerebral artery, anterior communicating artery complex, and the paraclinoid and paraclival internal carotid artery. The transclival approach was explored, and clips were successfully deployed along the proximal branches of the vertebrobasilar system and basilar trunk and bifurcation. The median sizes of skull base craniectomy necessary for exposure of the anterior communicating artery complex and basilar tip were 3.24 cm(2) and 4.62 cm(2), respectively. The mean angles of surgical corridors to the anterior communicating artery complex and basilar tip were 11.4° and 14°, respectively. Although clip placement was feasible on the basilar artery and its branches, the associated perforating arteries were difficult to visualize, posing unexpected difficulty for safe clip application, with the exception of ventrolateral-pointing aneurysms.

Conclusions: The authors characterize the feasibility of endonasal endoscopic clip ligation of aneurysms involving the paraclinoid, anterior communicating, and basilar arteries and proximal control of the paraclival internal carotid artery. The endoscopic approach should be initially considered for nonruptured aneurysms involving the paraclinoid and anterior communicating arteries, as well as ventrolateral basilar trunk aneurysms. Clinical experience will be mandatory to determine the applicability of this approach in practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2015.1.JNS142650DOI Listing
February 2016

Pneumocephalus patterns following endonasal endoscopic skull base surgery as predictors of postoperative CSF leaks.

J Neurosurg 2014 Oct 4;121(4):961-75. Epub 2014 Jul 4.

Departments of Neurological Surgery, Brain and Spine Center.

Objectives: Postoperative pneumocephalus is a common occurrence after endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery (ESBS). The risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks can be high and the presence of postoperative pneumocephalus associated with serosanguineous nasal drainage may raise suspicion for a CSF leak. The authors hypothesized that specific patterns of pneumocephalus on postoperative imaging could be predictive of CSF leaks. Identification of these patterns could guide the postoperative management of patients undergoing ESBS.

Methods: The authors queried a prospectively acquired database of 526 consecutive ESBS cases at a single center between December 1, 2003, and May 31, 2012, and identified 258 patients with an intraoperative CSF leak documented using intrathecal fluorescein. Postoperative CT and MRI scans obtained within 1-10 days were examined and pneumocephalus was graded based on location and amount. A discrete 0-4 scale was used to classify pneumocephalus patterns based on size and morphology. Pneumocephalus was correlated with the surgical approach, histopathological diagnosis, and presence of a postoperative CSF leak.

Results: The mean follow-up duration was 56.7 months. Of the 258 patients, 102 (39.5%) demonstrated pneumocephalus on postoperative imaging. The most frequent location of pneumocephalus was frontal (73 [71.5%] of 102), intraventricular (34 [33.3%]), and convexity (22 [21.6%]). Patients with craniopharyngioma (27 [87%] of 31) and meningioma (23 [68%] of 34) had the highest incidence of postoperative pneumocephalus compared with patients with pituitary adenomas (29 [20.6%] of 141) (p < 0.0001). The incidence of pneumocephalus was higher with transcribriform and transethmoidal approaches (8 of [73%] 11) than with a transsellar approach (9 of [7%] 131). There were 15 (5.8%) of 258 cases of postoperative CSF leak, of which 10 (66.7%) had pneumocephalus, compared with 92 (38%) of 243 patients without a postoperative CSF leak (OR 3.3, p = 0.027). Pneumocephalus located in the convexity, interhemispheric fissure, sellar region, parasellar region, and perimesencephalic region was significantly correlated with a postoperative CSF leak (OR 4.9, p = 0.006) and was therefore termed "suspicious" pneumocephalus. In contrast, frontal or intraventricular pneumocephalus was not correlated with postoperative CSF leak (not significant) and was defined as "benign" pneumocephalus. The amount of convexity pneumocephalus (p = 0.002), interhemispheric pneumocephalus (p = 0.005), and parasellar pneumocephalus (p = 0.007) (determined using a scale score of 0-4) was also significantly related to postoperative CSF leaks. Using a series of permutation-based multivariate analyses, the authors established that a model containing the learning curve, the transclival/transcavernous approach, and the presence of "suspicious" pneumocephalus provides the best overall prediction for postoperative CSF leaks.

Conclusions: Postoperative pneumocephalus is much more common following extended approaches than following transsellar surgery. Merely the presence of pneumocephalus, particularly in the frontal or intraventricular locations, is not necessarily associated with a postoperative CSF leak. A "suspicious" pattern of air, namely pneumocephalus in the convexity, interhemispheric fissure, sella, parasellar, or perimesencephalic locations, is significantly associated with a postoperative CSF leak. The presence and the score of "suspicious" pneumocephalus on postoperative imaging, in conjunction with the learning curve and the type of endoscopic approach, provide the best predictive model for postoperative CSF leaks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2014.5.JNS132028DOI Listing
October 2014

Giant left middle fossa VII nerve schwannoma associated with amnesia.

Neurology 2013 Aug;81(6):602

Department of Neuroradiology, C. Hospitalar Vila Nova Gaia/Espinho and Faculty of Medicine of Porto University, Portugal.

The facial nerve is the third most frequent location of intracranial schwannomas, with facial paresis the most common sign.(1,2) A 77-year-old woman presented with amnesia; the Mini-Mental State Examination score was 26, with normal cranial nerve function. A giant multicystic VII nerve schwannoma was identified in the left middle fossa, with components of the tumor in the temporal bone facial canal, geniculate ganglion, and internal auditory canal (figure). Compression of the hippocampus may have accounted for the clinical presentation. The middle fossa component of the tumor was resected for mass effect relief, with iatrogenic facial palsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e31829e6eecDOI Listing
August 2013

Primary spinal glioblastoma: A case report and review of the literature.

Oncol Lett 2013 Mar 14;5(3):992-996. Epub 2012 Dec 14.

Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital de Braga, Braga;

Primary spinal glioblastoma (GBM) is a rare disease, with an aggressive course and a poor prognosis. We report a case of a 19-year-old male with a 4-week history of progressive weakness in both lower limbs, which progressed to paraparesis with a left predominance and difficulty in initiating urination over a week. Spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an intramedullary expansile mass localised between T6 and T11. We performed a laminotomy and laminoplasty between T6 and T11 and the tumour was partially removed. Histopathological study was compatible with GBM. The patient was administered focal spine radiotherapy with chemotherapy with temozolamide. Serial MRI performed after the initial surgery demonstrated enlargement of the enhancing mass from T3 to T12 and subarachnoid metastatic deposits in C2 and C4, the pituitary stalk, inter-peduncular cistern, left superior cerebellar peduncle and hydrocephalus. We review the literature with regard to the disease and treatment options, and report the unique features of this case. Primary spinal GBM is an extremely rare entity with a poor prognosis and a short survival time. An aggressive management of the different complications as they arise and improvement of current modes of treatment and new treatment options are required to improve survival and ensure better quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ol.2012.1076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3576382PMC
March 2013

The transplanum transtuberculum approaches for suprasellar and sellar-suprasellar lesions: avoidance of cerebrospinal fluid leak and lessons learned.

World Neurosurg 2014 Jul-Aug;82(1-2):186-95. Epub 2013 Feb 9.

Department of Neurosurgery, Brain and Spine Center, Brain and Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA; Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Brain and Spine Center, Brain and Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA; Department of Otolaryngology, Brain and Spine Center, Brain and Mind Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: To present a large series of patients and examine the learning curve of the endonasal endoscopic transplanum, transtuberculum approach for primarily suprasellar or sellar-suprasellar tumors.

Methods: We identified 122 patients who underwent 126 surgeries using the transplanum, transtuberculum approach. Extent of resection was determined with volumetric analysis of magnetic resonance imagings. Results concerning vision, endocrine function, and complications were noted.

Results: Average tumor volume was 14 cm(3). The most frequent pathologies were pituitary macroadenoma (51.6%), craniopharyngioma (20.6%), and meningioma (15.9%). A total of 73% patients presented with visual compromise. Rates of gross total resection (GTR) and near total resection for the group as a whole were 58.1% and 13.7%, and for the patients in whom GTR was intended (n = 90), rates of GTR and near total resection were 77.5% and 12.5% for a total of 90%. Extent of resection in this group was 97.6%. Vision improved in 52.4% and deteriorated in 4.8%. Favorable endocrine outcome occurred in 63.5%. The cerebrospinal fluid leak rate was 3.1% for the series as a whole. It improved from 6.3% in the first half of the series to 0 in the second half. Leak rates varied with technique from 11% (fat graft only) to 4.2% (gasket seal only) to 1.8% (fat plus nasoseptal flap) to 0 (gasket plus nasoseptal flap). The rate of other complications was 14.3% in the first half of the series and 1.6% in the second half. There was one infection (0.8%).

Conclusions: The endonasal endoscopic transtuberculum transplanum approach is a safe and effective minimal access approach to midline pathology in the suprasellar cistern.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2013.02.032DOI Listing
October 2014

Difficulties diagnosing spinal subdural hemorrhage in a hypo-coagulated patient due to simultaneous symptomatic subdural cranial hemorrhage.

Authors:
Lino Mascarenhas

Eur Spine J 2009 Jul 11;18 Suppl 2:217-9. Epub 2008 Dec 11.

Neurosurgery Service, São Marcos Hospital, Apartado 2242, Braga, Portugal.

A hypo-coagulated 58-year-old female complained of headaches right after being exposed to the first pressure waves generated during an exhibition of fireworks. The day after she presented with seizures and the CT scan showed subdural hemorrhage over the left frontoparietal sulci. Eight hours after admission she disclosed left lower limb hypo-esthesia, i.e. a finding not attributable to the cranial hemorrhage. Four hours later sphincter dysfunction and paraparesis were also present with a left predominance. This was due to a T12-L1 subdural extramedullary hemorrhage. The patient was operated and showed a favorable outcome. Hypo-coagulated patients with cranial hemorrhage require prolonged surveillance and may harbor spinal hemorrhage as well. This rare combination can be unsuspected in view of the evident cranial event, and may cause severe neurological deficits if not detected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-008-0849-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2899568PMC
July 2009

[Clinical application of functional MR. Evaluation of motor functions and verbal fluency].

Acta Med Port 2003 May-Jun;16(3):125-30

Serviço de Neurorradiologia, Hospital Pedro Hispano, Matosinhos.

In this article we reviewed some examples of our experience in clinical applications of functional MRI (fMRI) in the motor and verbal fluency tasks evaluation. Seventeen patients with supratentorial cerebral pathology (5 arteriovenous malformations--AVMs, 2 meningiomas, 1 tuberculoma, 1 cortical tuberoma, 1 DNET, 2 cerebral metastases, 3 gliomas and 2 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis and medically intractable epilepsy--lateralization of language) and three healthy subjects were studied on a 1.5 T system (Signa GE) using a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD)--sensitive multi-slice EPI technique. Different paradigms for localization of the motor (hand/foot) and verbal fluency sensorimotor cortex were tested and selected for each pathology. In healthy subjects motor activation elicited BOLD signal changes in the sensorimotor cortex, permitting identification of primary motor and sensory cortical areas and focal activation of different cortical areas by a verbal fluency task. Twelve motor studies were performed and in 6 RMF results demonstrated the localization of motor hand areas near the lesion, and in nine studies of verbal fluency 6 activation were adjacent to the lesion. The studies were performed prior to neurosurgical procedures, contributed to therapeutical decisions and proved to be a valuable non invasive method of cortical mapping for preoperative planning.
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December 2003
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