Publications by authors named "Linnae Hutchison"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assisted living in rural America: results from a national survey.

J Rural Health 2005 ;21(2):131-9

Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Rural Public Health, Texas A&M University, Bryan, Tex. 77802, USA.

Context: Expanding the availability of long-term care (LTC) services and making them more responsive to consumer preferences is an important goal, particularly for elderly people living in rural areas who tend to be older and have greater functional limitations but less access to the range of LTC options available in metropolitan areas. One option that has been growing in popularity is assisted-living facilities (ALFs).

Purpose And Methods: This paper describes rural ALFs and compares them with metropolitan ALFs. Data were collected using a multistage sample design that yielded a nationally representative sample of ALFs. Telephone interviews were completed with administrators of 1,251 ALFs in 1998.

Findings: Nationwide, assisted living was largely administered by private payment, and there was an undersupply in rural areas. Compared with metropolitan ALFs, rural ALFs were smaller and less likely to offer the types of services and accommodations associated with the philosophy of assisted living. They were more likely to offer accommodations with little privacy, and while similar in the services they offered, rural ALFs were less likely to have nurses on staff, particularly licensed practical nurses. Moreover, they were less likely to offer a combination of high services and high privacy. Finally, rural ALFs charged lower prices than urban ALFs; however, the average price was still unaffordable for most elderly rural residents.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that assisted living, as currently structured, will make only a marginal contribution to meeting the needs of frail elders in rural areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2005.tb00073.xDOI Listing
June 2005

Rural healthy people 2010--evolving interactive practice.

Am J Public Health 2004 Oct;94(10):1711-2

Professor of Health Policy and Management, School of Rural Public Health, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, 1266 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA.

The objectives of the Rural Healthy People 2010 project are to employ a survey of state and local rural health leaders to identify rural health priorities, to synthesize available research and other publications on these priorities, to identify and describe models for practice employed by rural communities to address these priorities, and to disseminate this information to rural communities. We describe these priorities; the content of Rural Healthy People 2010 products, methods, and target audiences; and the continuing evolution of the program. Rural Healthy People 2010 encourages rural support of Healthy People 2010 goals and invites state and local rural health leaders to share their successful models with others.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1448522PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/ajph.94.10.1711DOI Listing
October 2004

Rural health priorities in America: where you stand depends on where you sit.

J Rural Health 2003 ;19(3):209-13

Southwest Rural Health Research Center, School of Rural Public Health, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, 3000 Briarcrest, Suite 300, Bryan, TX 77802, USA.

Purpose: To assess levels of agreement on priority areas among state and local rural health leaders nationwide.

Methods: Analysis of responses to a mail survey sent to 999 rural health leaders, with 501 responses. Respondents were asked to rank importance to rural health of focus areas named in Healthy People 2010.

Findings: There was substantial agreement on top rural health priorities among state and local rural health leaders across the 50 states. "Access to quality health services" was the top priority among leaders of state-level rural agencies and health associations, local rural public health agencies, rural health clinics and community health centers, and rural hospitals. It was the top priority across all 4 major census regions of the nation as well. The next 4 top-ranking rural priorities--"heart disease and stroke," "diabetes," "mental health and mental disorders," and "oral health"--were selected as 1 of the top 5 rural priorities by one third or more of respondents across most groups and regions. At the same time, some observed differences in rural health priorities suggest opportunities for community partnership strategies or for regional multistate policy initiatives by states sharing similar rural health priorities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2003.tb00563.xDOI Listing
July 2003

Rural healthy people 2010: identifying rural health priorities and models for practice.

J Rural Health 2002 ;18(1):9-14

Southwest Rural Health Research Center, School of Rural Public Health, Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, Bryan, 77802, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2002.tb00869.xDOI Listing
July 2002