Publications by authors named "Lingdi Dong"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Damage to the blood‑brain barrier and activation of neuroinflammation by focal cerebral ischemia under hyperglycemic condition.

Int J Mol Med 2021 07 3;48(1). Epub 2021 Jun 3.

Department of Pathology, School of Basic Medical Science, Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia Key Laboratory of Cerebrocranial Diseases, Incubation Base of National Key Laboratory, Yinchuan, Ningxia 750004, P.R. China.

Hyperglycemia aggravates brain damage caused by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and increases the permeability of the blood‑brain barrier (BBB). However, there are relatively few studies on morphological changes of the BBB. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of hyperglycemia on BBB morphological changes following cerebral I/R injury. Streptozotocin‑induced hyperglycemic and citrate‑buffered saline‑injected normoglycemic rats were subjected to 30 min middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neurological deficits were evaluated. Brain infarct volume was assessed by 2,3,5‑triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and BBB integrity was evaluated by Evans blue and IgG extravasation following 24 h reperfusion. Changes in tight junctions (TJ) and basement membrane (BM) proteins (claudin, occludin and zonula occludens‑1) were examined using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Astrocytes, microglial cells and neutrophils were labeled with specific antibodies for immunohistochemistry after 1, 3 and 7 days of reperfusion. Hyperglycemia increased extravasations of Evan's blue and IgG and aggravated damage to TJ and BM proteins following I/R injury. Furthermore, hyperglycemia suppressed astrocyte activation and damaged astrocytic endfeet surrounding cerebral blood vessels following I/R. Hyperglycemia inhibited microglia activation and proliferation and increased neutrophil infiltration in the brain. It was concluded that hyperglycemia‑induced BBB leakage following I/R might be caused by damage to TJ and BM proteins and astrocytic endfeet. Furthermore, suppression of microglial cells and increased neutrophil infiltration to the brain may contribute to the detrimental effects of pre‑ischemic hyperglycemia on the outcome of cerebral ischemic stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ijmm.2021.4975DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8175066PMC
July 2021

Genetic diversity and association mapping of mineral element concentrations in spinach leaves.

BMC Genomics 2017 Dec 4;18(1):941. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

Department of Horticulture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 72701, USA.

Background: Spinach is a useful source of dietary vitamins and mineral elements. Breeding new spinach cultivars with high nutritional value is one of the main goals in spinach breeding programs worldwide, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for mineral element concentrations is necessary to support spinach molecular breeding. The purpose of this study was to conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and to identify SNP markers associated with mineral elements in the USDA-GRIN spinach germplasm collection.

Results: A total of 14 mineral elements: boron (B), calcium (Ca), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), sodium (Na), nickel (Ni), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), and zinc (Zn) were evaluated in 292 spinach accessions originally collected from 29 countries. Significant genetic variations were found among the tested genotypes as evidenced by the 2 to 42 times difference in mineral concentrations. A total of 2402 SNPs identified from genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approach were used for genetic diversity and GWAS. Six statistical methods were used for association analysis. Forty-five SNP markers were identified to be strongly associated with the concentrations of 13 mineral elements. Only two weakly associated SNP markers were associated with K concentration. Co-localized SNPs for different elemental concentrations were discovered in this research. Three SNP markers, AYZV02017731_40, AYZV02094133_57, and AYZV02281036_185 were identified to be associated with concentrations of four mineral components, Co, Mn, S, and Zn. There is a high validating correlation coefficient with r > 0.7 among concentrations of the four elements. Thirty-one spinach accessions, which rank in the top three highest concentrations in each of the 14 mineral elements, were identified as potential parents for spinach breeding programs in the future.

Conclusions: The 45 SNP markers strongly associated with the concentrations of the 13 mineral elements: B, Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, S, and Zn could be used in breeding programs to improve the nutritional quality of spinach through marker-assisted selection (MAS). The 31 spinach accessions with high concentrations of one to several mineral elements can be used as potential parents for spinach breeding programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12864-017-4297-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5715654PMC
December 2017

Genetic diversity and population structure analysis of spinach by single-nucleotide polymorphisms identified through genotyping-by-sequencing.

PLoS One 2017 30;12(11):e0188745. Epub 2017 Nov 30.

Department of Horticulture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, United States of America.

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., 2n = 2x = 12) is an economically important vegetable crop worldwide and one of the healthiest vegetables due to its high concentrations of nutrients and minerals. The objective of this research was to conduct genetic diversity and population structure analysis of a collection of world-wide spinach genotypes using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) markers. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) was used to discover SNPs in spinach genotypes. Three sets of spinach genotypes were used: 1) 268 USDA GRIN spinach germplasm accessions originally collected from 30 countries; 2) 45 commercial spinach F1 hybrids from three countries; and 3) 30 US Arkansas spinach cultivars/breeding lines. The results from this study indicated that there was genetic diversity among the 343 spinach genotypes tested. Furthermore, the genetic background in improved commercial F1 hybrids and in Arkansas cultivars/lines had a different structured populations from the USDA germplasm. In addition, the genetic diversity and population structures were associated with geographic origin and germplasm from the US Arkansas breeding program had a unique genetic background. These data could provide genetic diversity information and the molecular markers for selecting parents in spinach breeding programs.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0188745PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5708663PMC
December 2017

Association analysis of salt tolerance in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) at germination and seedling stages.

Theor Appl Genet 2018 Jan 25;131(1):79-91. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

Department of Horticulture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 72701, USA.

Key Message: This is the first report on association analysis of salt tolerance and identification of SNP markers associated with salt tolerance in cowpea. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is one of the most important cultivated legumes in Africa. The worldwide annual production in cowpea dry seed is 5.4 million metric tons. However, cowpea is unfavorably affected by salinity stress at germination and seedling stages, which is exacerbated by the effects of climate change. The lack of knowledge on the genetic underlying salt tolerance in cowpea limits the establishment of a breeding strategy for developing salt-tolerant cowpea cultivars. The objectives of this study were to conduct association mapping for salt tolerance at germination and seedling stages and to identify SNP markers associated with salt tolerance in cowpea. We analyzed the salt tolerance index of 116 and 155 cowpea accessions at germination and seedling stages, respectively. A total of 1049 SNPs postulated from genotyping-by-sequencing were used for association analysis. Population structure was inferred using Structure 2.3.4; K optimal was determined using Structure Harvester. TASSEL 5, GAPIT, and FarmCPU involving three models such as single marker regression, general linear model, and mixed linear model were used for the association study. Substantial variation in salt tolerance index for germination rate, plant height reduction, fresh and dry shoot biomass reduction, foliar leaf injury, and inhibition of the first trifoliate leaf was observed. The cowpea accessions were structured into two subpopulations. Three SNPs, Scaffold87490_622, Scaffold87490_630, and C35017374_128 were highly associated with salt tolerance at germination stage. Seven SNPs, Scaffold93827_270, Scaffold68489_600, Scaffold87490_633, Scaffold87490_640, Scaffold82042_3387, C35069468_1916, and Scaffold93942_1089 were found to be associated with salt tolerance at seedling stage. The SNP markers were consistent across the three models and could be used as a tool to select salt-tolerant lines for breeding improved cowpea tolerance to salinity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00122-017-2987-0DOI Listing
January 2018
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