Publications by authors named "Linda R Chambliss"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Partner Disengagement and Maternal and Neonatal Outcome.

J Womens Health (Larchmt) 2017 03;26(3):199

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Creighton University School of Medicine , Omaha, Nebraska.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2017.6337DOI Listing
March 2017

Body Mass Index As a Measure of Obesity: Racial Differences in Predictive Value for Health Parameters During Pregnancy.

J Womens Health (Larchmt) 2016 12;25(12):1198

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Creighton University School of Medicine , Omaha, Nebraska.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2016.6184DOI Listing
December 2016

Effect of obesity on preterm delivery prediction by transabdominal recording of uterine electromyography.

Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2016 Oct;55(5):692-696

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: It has been shown that noninvasive uterine electromyography (EMG) can identify true preterm labor more accurately than methods available to clinicians today. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the accuracy of uterine EMG in predicting preterm delivery.

Materials And Methods: Predictive values of uterine EMG for preterm delivery were compared in obese versus overweight/normal BMI patients. Hanley-McNeil test was used to compare receiver operator characteristics curves in these groups. Previously reported EMG cutoffs were used to determine groups with false positive/false negative and true positive/true negative EMG results. BMI in these groups was compared with Student t test (p < 0.05 significant).

Results: A total of 88 patients were included: 20 obese, 64 overweight, and four with normal BMI. EMG predicted preterm delivery within 7 days with area under the curve = 0.95 in the normal/overweight group, and with area under the curve = 1.00 in the obese group (p = 0.08). Six patients in true preterm labor (delivering within 7 days from EMG measurement) had low EMG values (false negative group). There were no false positive results. No significant differences in patient's BMI were noted between false negative group patients and preterm labor patients with high EMG values (true positive group) and nonlabor patients with low EMG values (true negative group; p = 0.32).

Conclusion: Accuracy of noninvasive uterine EMG monitoring and its predictive value for preterm delivery are not affected by obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tjog.2015.05.005DOI Listing
October 2016

Management of rhinosinusitis during pregnancy: systematic review and expert panel recommendations.

Rhinology 2016 06;54(2):99-104

Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, University College London Hospitals, London, United Kingdom.

Background: Management of rhinosinusitis during pregnancy requires special considerations.

Objectives: 1. Conduct a systematic literature review for acute and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) management during pregnancy. 2. Make evidence-based recommendations.

Methods: The systematic review was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and relevant search terms. Title, abstract and full manuscript review were conducted by two authors independently. A multispecialty panel with expertise in management of Rhinological disorders, Allergy-Immunology, and Obstetrics-Gynecology was invited to review the systematic review. Recommendations were sought on use of following for CRS management during pregnancy: oral corticosteroids; antibiotics; leukotrienes; topical corticosteroid spray/irrigations/drops; aspirin desensitization; elective surgery for CRS with polyps prior to planned pregnancy; vaginal birth versus planned Caesarian for skull base erosions/ prior CSF rhinorrhea.

Results: Eighty-eight manuscripts underwent full review after screening 3052 abstracts. No relevant level 1, 2, or 3 studies were found. Expert panel recommendations for rhinosinusitis management during pregnancy included continuing nasal corticosteroid sprays for CRS maintenance, using pregnancy-safe antibiotics for acute rhinosinusitis and CRS exacerbations, and discontinuing aspirin desensitization for aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease. The manuscript presents detailed recommendations.

Conclusions: The lack of evidence pertinent to managing rhinosinusitis during pregnancy warrants future trials. Expert recommendations constitute the current best available evidence.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4193/Rhino15.228DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5797655PMC
June 2016

Use of real-time ultrasonography to diagnose pseudolabor.

Psychosomatics 2014 Jul-Aug;55(4):392-395. Epub 2013 Sep 27.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Creighton University School of Medicine at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2013.09.005DOI Listing
August 2016

Paper gestational age wheels are generally inaccurate.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2014 Feb 11;210(2):145.e1-4. Epub 2013 Sep 11.

Hospital Corporation of America, Nashville, TN.

Objective: To compare the estimated date of confinement of paper gestational wheels to the estimated date of confinement of APPs wheels using a standard last menstrual period.

Methods: Obstetric providers were asked for their gestational wheels. The last menstrual period was set at Jan. 1, 2013, and the estimated date of confinement obtained was compared with the estimated date of confinement of Oct. 8th if the pregnancy completed 280 days. The process was performed on 20 electronic APPs downloadable to cell phones. The process was repeated for both for the leap year of 2012.

Results: Thirty-one paper wheels from a variety of sources were collected. Ten wheels (35%) were consistent with the standard pregnancy duration of 280 days. Among the wheels surveyed, the largest discrepancy was 4 days short of 280 days. Two wheels gave an estimated date of confinement that differed from each other by 7 days. Wheels from the same source did not agree with each other. Twenty electronic gestational age calculators were examined. All 20 gave an estimated date of confinement of Oct. 8 consistent with 280 days. None of the paper gestational wheels but all of the APPs corrected for a leap year.

Conclusion: In contrast to APPs gestational age calculators, the estimated date of confinement of the majority of paper wheels deviated from the standard pregnancy duration of 280 days. Precision in gestational age assessment is critical in a variety of clinical settings and heightened by the focus by payers and reporting agencies on elective deliveries before 39 weeks. The use of paper gestational age wheels should be abandoned.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2013.09.013DOI Listing
February 2014

Costs of unnecessary admissions and treatments for "threatened preterm labor".

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2013 Sep 29;209(3):217.e1-3. Epub 2013 Jun 29.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA.

Objective: Cervical length (CL) of 3 cm or greater has been shown to have a 97-99% negative predictive value for preterm delivery in women with threatened preterm labor. Consequently, hospitalization and treatment are not indicated in these patients. We analyzed how often patients with a CL of 3 cm or greater are still being admitted and treated for preterm labor and how much this contributes to the economic burden of preterm labor hospitalizations.

Study Design: Twelve month hospitalizations for preterm labor at less than 34 weeks at a single institution were reviewed and patients with a CL of 3 cm or greater were identified. We chose to use patients' hospital charges as a surrogate for health care costs, recognizing that charges are not synonymous with the final patient bill and also do not reflect additional costs such as the cost of treatment at the referring facility, transportation, physician fees, and other such costs as lost wages, need for additional child care, etc.

Results: Between July 2009 and June 2010, 139 patients were admitted and treated for preterm labor at our level III center. Fifty of these patients (36%) had a CL of 3 cm or greater. None of them delivered preterm. Total hospital charges for the management of these patients were $1,018 589 (mean, $20,372; median, $14,444).

Conclusion: Unnecessary admissions and treatments for threatened preterm labor are part of clinical practice and contribute to exploding health care costs. Using currently available diagnostics, these costs could be lowered significantly without jeopardizing outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2013.06.046DOI Listing
September 2013

Progestin treatment for the prevention of preterm birth.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2011 Oct 27;90(10):1057-69. Epub 2011 Jun 27.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, 445 North 5th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA.

Progestin supplementation appears to be a promising approach to both preventing initiation of preterm labor and treating it once it is already established, given the role of progesterone in maintaining pregnancy, as well as support from basic and clinical research. Progesterone and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone acetate slow the process of cervical ripening, and this is the rationale for prophylactic long-term progestin supplementation mostly studied so far. However, progesterone (but not 17α-hydroxyprogesterone acetate) also inhibits myometrial activity even after the cervix has already ripened. Moreover, these effects depend greatly on the vehicle used and the route of administration. Understanding different mechanisms of action, as well as the importance of progestin formulation, vehicle and route of administration, is the key to finding the optimal progestin treatment for prevention of preterm birth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0412.2011.01178.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3176986PMC
October 2011

Use of uterine electromyography to diagnose term and preterm labor.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2011 Feb 7;90(2):150-7. Epub 2010 Dec 7.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA.

Current methodologies to assess the process of labor, such as tocodynamometry or intrauterine pressure catheters, fetal fibronectin, cervical length measurement and digital cervical examination, have several major drawbacks. They only measure the onset of labor indirectly and do not detect cellular changes characteristic of true labor. Consequently, their predictive values for term or preterm delivery are poor. Uterine contractions are a result of the electrical activity within the myometrium. Measurement of uterine electromyography (EMG) has been shown to detect contractions as accurately as the currently used methods. In addition, changes in cell excitability and coupling required for effective contractions that lead to delivery are reflected in changes of several EMG parameters. Use of uterine EMG can help to identify patients in true labor better than any other method presently employed in the clinic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0412.2010.01031.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3151256PMC
February 2011

Noninvasive uterine electromyography for prediction of preterm delivery.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2011 Mar 8;204(3):228.e1-10. Epub 2010 Dec 8.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, 445 N. 5th Street, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA.

Objective: Power spectrum (PS) of uterine electromyography (EMG) can identify true labor. EMG propagation velocity (PV) to diagnose labor has not been reported. The objective was to compare uterine EMG against current methods to predict preterm delivery.

Study Design: EMG was recorded in 116 patients (preterm labor, n = 20; preterm nonlabor, n = 68; term labor, n = 22; term nonlabor, n = 6). A Student t test was used to compare EMG values for labor vs nonlabor (P < .05, significant). Predictive values of EMG, Bishop score, contractions on tocogram, and transvaginal cervical length were calculated using receiver-operator characteristics analysis.

Results: PV was higher in preterm and term labor compared with nonlabor (P < .001). Combined PV and PS peak frequency predicted preterm delivery within 7 days with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.96. Bishop score, contractions, and cervical length had an AUC of 0.72, 0.67, and 0.54.

Conclusion: Uterine EMG PV and PS peak frequency more accurately identify true preterm labor than clinical methods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2010.09.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3090039PMC
March 2011

Intimate partner violence and its implication for pregnancy.

Clin Obstet Gynecol 2008 Jun;51(2):385-97

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine Department of Labor and Delivery, Saint Mary's Health center, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a common occurrence in pregnancy and results in an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Homicide may be the most common cause of maternal death. Women who are pregnant and the victims of IPV have high rates of stress, are more likely to smoke or use other drugs, deliver a preterm or low birth weight infant, have an increase in infectious complications, and are less likely to obtain prenatal care. The IPV continues in the postpartum period. Adolescents may be at even higher risk than their adult counterparts. Children raised in violent homes have both immediate and life long adverse health outcomes as a result of their exposure to IPV. IPV adds substantially to healthcare costs both for direct services to treat the injuries and higher utilization of a wide range of healthcare services. Healthcare providers, particularly those who care for pregnant women, are in a unique position to identify these women and direct them and their families to the help they need to end the violence in their lives.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GRF.0b013e31816f29ceDOI Listing
June 2008

Case 27-2007: Intrauterine fetal death.

N Engl J Med 2007 Nov;357(22):2310; author reply 2310

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMc072835DOI Listing
November 2007

Cesarean delivery and respiratory distress syndrome: does labor make a difference?

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2005 Sep;193(3 Pt 2):1061-4

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women's Health, Maricopa Integrated Health System, MedPro, Phoeniz, AZ, USA.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine if cesarean delivery is a risk factor for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and if this risk is modified by labor before cesarean.

Study Design: This population-based case-control study compared 4778 cases of RDS to 5 times as many controls.

Results: Unadjusted, cesarean delivery was associated with RDS, odds ratio (OR) 3.5 (95% CI 3.2-3.8). After controlling for potential confounding variables, cesarean remained an independent risk factor, OR 2.3 (95% CI 2.1-2.6). Labor modified this risk significantly (P = .02)--with labor, cesarean delivery had an OR of 1.9 (95% CI 2.2-2.9), without labor, the OR was 2.6 (95% CI 1.3-2.8).

Conclusion: Cesarean delivery was an independent risk factor for RDS. The risk was reduced with labor before cesarean, but still elevated. This supports the importance of being certain of fetal lung maturity before cesarean delivery, particularly when done before labor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2005.05.038DOI Listing
September 2005
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