Publications by authors named "Linda Latta"

5 Publications

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Inpatient falls in freestanding children's hospitals.

Pediatr Nurs 2014 May-Jun;40(3):127-35

Patient falls are considered a significant safety risk, but little evidence regarding the significance of falls in children is available. A multisite, observational study of fall events occurring in pediatric inpatients (younger than 18 years of age) from Child Health Corporation of America member hospitals was conducted to determine the prevalence and significance of falls. Fall prevalence was 0.84 per 1,000 patient days with 48% classified as preventable. Injuries occurred in 32%, but only two falls resulted in an increased length of stay; none resulted in permanent disability or death. Only 47% of the children who fell were identified to be at risk for fall. Alert mechanisms were used in 60% and preventive measures in 23%. These findings suggest that while inpatient pediatric fall rates are lower than those of adults, greater diligence in identification and risk reduction may further reduce the prevalence of falls and the proportion of fall-related injuries.
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September 2014

Developing a robust professional practice model using a shared governance approach.

J Pediatr Nurs 2011 Dec 25;26(6):580-5. Epub 2011 Aug 25.

Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA, USA.

This article describes the development and implementation of a framework for nursing practice in a freestanding children's hospital and the subsequent improvement process used to transition that framework into a robust professional practice model (PPM). The development of a PPM encompassing all aspects of nursing in all clinical settings is an important milestone on a successful Magnet journey. Strategies for linking the PPM to core processes and structures of nursing are shared. Plans for further study to demonstrate the relationship of a PPM to patient outcomes are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2011.06.010DOI Listing
December 2011

Using continuous process improvement methodology to standardize nursing handoff communication.

J Pediatr Nurs 2012 Apr 3;27(2):168-73. Epub 2011 Nov 3.

Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA, USA.

The purpose of this article was to describe the use of continuous performance improvement (CPI) methodology to standardize nurse shift-to-shift handoff communication. The goals of the process were to standardize the content and process of shift handoff, improve patient safety, increase patient and family involvement in the handoff process, and decrease end-of-shift overtime. This article will describe process changes made over a 4-year period as result of application of the plan-do-check-act procedure, which is an integral part of the CPI methodology, and discuss further work needed to continue to refine this critical nursing care process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2011.08.005DOI Listing
April 2012

Parental responses to involvement in rounds on a pediatric inpatient unit at a teaching hospital: a qualitative study.

Acad Med 2008 Mar;83(3):292-7

Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, 4800 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105-0371, USA.

Purpose: In pediatric teaching hospitals, medical decisions are traditionally made by the attending and resident physicians during rounds that do not include parents. This structure limits the ability of the medical team to provide "family-centered care" and the attending physician to model communication skills. The authors thus set out to identify how parents responded to participation in interdisciplinary teaching rounds conducted in a large tertiary care children's teaching hospital.

Method: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted using data from semistructured interviews of parents who had participated in rounds on the inpatient medical unit of a large academic children's hospital. From December 2004 to April 2005, 18 parents were interviewed after their participation in rounds. Questions assessed their experiences, expectations, preferred communication styles, and suggestions for improvement. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: Being able to communicate, understand the plan, and participate with the team in decision making about their child's care were the most frequently cited outcomes of importance to parents. All 18 participants described the overall experience as positive, and 17 of 18 described themselves as "comfortable" with inclusion in rounds. Use of lay terminology and inclusion of nurses in rounds were preferred.

Conclusions: Including parents on ward rounds at a teaching hospital was viewed positively by parents. Specific themes of particular importance to parents were identified. Further study is needed to assess the impact of inclusion of parents on rounds on patient outcomes and the resident experience.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181637e21DOI Listing
March 2008

Improving healthcare and outcomes for high-risk children and teens: formation of the National Consortium for Pediatric and Adolescent Evidence-Based Practice.

Pediatr Nurs 2007 Nov-Dec;33(6):525-9

Arizona State University College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation, Phoenix 85004, USA.

Although major healthcare and professional organizations as well as key leaders have long emphasized the importance of evidence-based practice (EBP) in improving patient care and outcomes, the majority of healthcare professionals do not implement EBP. There is a huge gap in time that exists between the generation of research findings and the translation of those findings into clinical practice. Many efficacious interventions are not being used in clinical practice even though research findings suggest that they improve child and adolescent health and development. Conversely, many clinical practices are being implemented without sufficient evidence to support their use. Because of the need to accelerate EBP and to generate evidence to support best practices, the first EBP Leadership Summit focused on children and adolescents was conducted in February 2007. Several nationally recognized EBP experts and healthcare leaders from a number of children's hospitals and colleges of nursing across the U.S. participated in the Summit. This article describes the process used and outcomes generated from this landmark event in child and adolescent healthcare, including the launching of the new National Consortium for Pediatric and Adolescent EBP (NCPAEP). Future directions of the consortium also are highlighted.
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March 2008