Publications by authors named "Linda G Shaffer"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I: First report from the Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Registry of North America (CDAR).

Blood Cells Mol Dis 2021 Mar 24;87:102534. Epub 2020 Dec 24.

Division of Hematology, Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Electronic address:

Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and distinctive erythroblast abnormalities; the diagnosis is often missed or delayed due to significant phenotypic heterogeneity. We established the CDA Registry of North America (CDAR) to study the natural history of CDA and create a biorepository to investigate the pathobiology of this heterogeneous disease. Seven of 47 patients enrolled so far in CDAR have CDA-I due to biallelic CDAN1 mutations. They all presented with perinatal anemia and required transfusions during infancy. Anemia spontaneously improved during infancy in three patients; two became transfusion-independent rapidly after starting interferon-α; and two remain transfusion-dependent at last follow-up at ages 5 and 30 y.o. One of the transfusion-dependent patients underwent splenectomy at 11 y.o due to misdiagnosis and returned to medical attention at 27 y.o with severe hemolytic anemia and pulmonary hypertension. All patients developed iron overload even without transfusions; four were treated with chelation. Genetic testing allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis; the median age of confirmed diagnosis in our cohort was 3 y.o compared to 17.3 y.o historically. In conclusion, CDAR provides an organized research network for multidisciplinary clinical and research collaboration to conduct natural history and biologic studies in CDA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bcmd.2020.102534DOI Listing
March 2021

Deficiency of complement factor H-related proteins and autoantibody-positive hemolytic uremic syndrome in an infant with combined partial deficiencies and autoantibodies to complement factor H and ADAMTS13.

Clin Kidney J 2018 Dec 7;11(6):791-796. Epub 2018 Mar 7.

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.

A 3-month-old male infant developed an extremely severe episode of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) associated with partial deficiencies of full-length complement factor H (FH; ∼15% of infant normal) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 (ADAMTS13) (39% of normal) and autoantibodies reactive with both proteins. His FH and ADAMTS13 genes were normal, indicating that the partial deficiencies were acquired, probably as the result of autoantibodies against full-length FH and ADAMTS13. The child also had a homozygous deletion of the complement factor H-related (CFHR)3-CFHR1 portion in the complement factor H () gene cluster. He therefore had deficiency of CFHR proteins and autoantibody-positive hemolytic uremic syndrome (DEAP-HUS) with an unusual early onset associated with a partial deficiency of ADAMTS13 and an anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibody. His clinical episode of aHUS responded to plasma infusion and subsequent treatment with mycophenolate and rituximab. We believe that this is the first report of DEAP-HUS in an infant with partial deficiencies in both ADAMTS13 and full-length FH acquired in association with autoantibodies to both proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ckj/sfy010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6275444PMC
December 2018