Publications by authors named "Linda Denise Fernandes Moreira"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Lean mass as a determinant of bone mineral density of proximal femur in postmenopausal women.

Arch Endocrinol Metab 2018 Aug;62(4):431-437

Disciplina de Endocrinologia da Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP Brasil.

Objective: To verify which component of body composition (BC) has greater influence on postmenopausal women bone mineral density (BMD).

Subjects And Methods: Four hundred and thirty women undergoing treatment for osteoporosis and 513 untreated women, except for calcium and vitamin D. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed in order to correlated BMD at lumbar spine (LS), total femur (FT), femoral neck (FN) with body mass (BM), total lean mass (LM) and total fat mass (FM), all determined by DXA.

Results: BM significantly correlated with all bone sites in untreated and treated women (r = 0.420 vs 0.277 at LS; r = 0.490 vs 0.418 at FN, r = 0.496 vs 0.414 at FT, respectively). In untreated women, the LM correlated better than FM with all sites, explaining 179% of LS; 32.3% of FN and 30.2% of FT; whereas FM explained 13.2% of LS; 277% of FN, 23.4% of FT In treated women, correlations with BC were less relevant, with the LM explaining 6.7% of BMD at LS; 15.2% of FN, 16% of FT, whereas the FM explained 8.1% of LS; 179% of FN and 176% of FT.

Conclusion: LM in untreated women was better predictor of BMD than FM, especialy for distal femur, where it explained more than 30% of the BMD, suggesting that maintaining a healthy muscle mass may contribute to decrease osteoporosis risk. Treatment with anti-osteoporotic drugs seems to mask these relationships. Arch Endocrinol Metab. 2018;62(4):431-7.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.20945/2359-3997000000059DOI Listing
August 2018

Physical exercise and osteoporosis: effects of different types of exercises on bone and physical function of postmenopausal women.

Arq Bras Endocrinol Metabol 2014 Jul;58(5):514-22

Division of Endocrinology, School of Medicine, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Physical exercise is an important stimulus for osteoporosis prevention and treatment. However, it is not clear yet which modality would be better to stimulate bone metabolism and enhance physical function of postmenopausal women. This review paper aims to summarize and update present knowledge on the effects of different kinds of aquatic and ground physical exercises on bone metabolism and physical function of postmenopausal women. Moderate to intense exercises, performed in a high speed during short intervals of time, in water or on the ground, can be part of a program to prevent and treat postmenopausal osteoporosis. Mechanical vibration has proven to be beneficial for bone microarchitecture, improving bone density and bone strength, as well as increasing physical function. Although impact exercises are recognized as beneficial for the stimulation of bone tissue, other variables such as muscle strength, type of muscle contraction, duration and intensity of exercises are also determinants to induce changes in bone metabolism of postmenopausal women. Not only osteoanabolic exercises should be recommended; activities aimed to develop muscle strength and body balance and improve the proprioception should be encouraged to prevent falls and fractures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0004-2730000003374DOI Listing
July 2014

The benefits of a high-intensity aquatic exercise program (HydrOS) for bone metabolism and bone mass of postmenopausal women.

J Bone Miner Metab 2014 Jul 19;32(4):411-9. Epub 2013 Sep 19.

Division of Endocrinology, School of Medicine, Federal University of São Paulo/UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil,

This study aimed to evaluate the 24-week effects of a high-intensity aquatic exercise program on bone remodeling markers and bone mass of postmenopausal women. In this randomized, controlled trial we studied 108 women (58.8 ± 6.4 years), randomized into Aquatic Exercise Group (AEG), n = 64, performing 24 weeks of aquatic exercises, and Control Group (CG), n = 44, sedentary. They had their fasting morning blood sample collected for the measures of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx). Bone mass was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and after the intervention. Participants of both groups received a daily supplementation of 500 mg of elementary calcium and 1,000 IU of vitamin D (cholecalciferol). Results showed an augment in bone formation marker (P1NP) only in the AEG (15.8 %; p = 0.001), and although both groups experienced significant enhancements in bone resorption marker (CTx), this increase was less considerable in the AEG (15 % in the AEG and 29 % in the CG). IPTH was increased by 19 % in the CG (p = 0.003) at the end. The femoral trochanter BMD presented a 1.2 % reduction in the CG (p = 0.009), whereas in the AEG no change was observed (p = 0.069). The proposed aquatic exercise program was efficient in attenuating bone resorption raise and enhancing bone formation, which prevented the participants in the AEG from reducing the femoral trochanter BMD, as happened in the CG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00774-013-0509-yDOI Listing
July 2014

High-intensity aquatic exercises (HydrOS) improve physical function and reduce falls among postmenopausal women.

Menopause 2013 Oct;20(10):1012-9

From the 1Division of Endocrinology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; and 3Exercise Research Laboratory, School of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

Objective: This study aims to investigate the effects of an aquatic exercise program (HydrOS) on neuromuscular function and falls among postmenopausal women.

Methods: One hundred eight postmenopausal women (mean [SD] age, 58.8 [6.4] y) were randomly divided into the control group (CG; n = 44) and the aquatic exercise group (AEG; n = 64). Both groups received elementary calcium 500 mg/day and cholecalciferol 1,000 IU/day. For 24 weeks, the AEG participated in the aquatic exercise program, whereas the CG remained sedentary. The following variables were measured before and after the program: number of falls and fallers (7 mo before and after the intervention); flexibility, using Wells' Sit-and-Reach Test (FLEX); static balance, using the Unipedal Stance Test (UST); mobility, using the Timed-Up-and-Go test (TUG); handgrip strength of the dominant hand (HGS); and maximal isometric strength of back extensor muscles (SBE), strength of hip flexor muscles (SHF), and strength of knee extensor muscles (SKE). The muscle strength tests were considered the primary outcome, whereas the other neuromuscular tests, together with falls, were considered secondary outcomes. Results were significant when P ≤ 0.05.

Results: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D significantly increased by 21% in the CG and by 23% in the AEG (P < 0.001). The number of falls and fallers after the program remained unchanged in the CG; in the AEG, the mean number of falls decreased from 2.00 to 0.29 (P < 0.0001), and the number of fallers decreased by 44% (P < 0.0001). All neuromuscular variables significantly improved in the AEG: FLEX (26.6%; P < 0.0001), UST (14.1%; P < 0.001), TUG (23.7%; P < 0.001), HGS (13.4%; P < 0.001), SBE (26.2%; P < 0.001), SHF (18.5%; P = 0.039), and SKE (7.7%; P < 0.001). In the CG, significant improvements in FLEX (12.2%; P = 0.009), UST (4.5%; P < 0.001), TUG (10%; P < 0.001), and SHF (5.7%; P = 0.039) were observed and could be explained by increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level attributable to supplementation.

Conclusions: The aquatic exercise program HydrOS is a safe and efficient way to improve physical function and to reduce falls among postmenopausal women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/GME.0b013e3182850138DOI Listing
October 2013
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