Publications by authors named "Limpho Ramangoaela"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effectiveness and cardiac safety of bedaquiline-based therapy for drug-resistant tuberculosis: a prospective cohort study.

Clin Infect Dis 2021 Apr 21. Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Wellcome Centre for Infectious Diseases Research in Africa, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, and Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

Background: Bedaquiline improves treatment outcomes in patients with rifampin-resistant TB (RR-TB) but prolongs the QT-interval and carries a black-box warning by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The World Health Organization recommends that all patients with RR-TB receive a regimen containing bedaquiline, yet a phase 3 clinical trial demonstrating its cardiac safety has not been published.

Methods: We conducted an observational cohort study of RR-TB patients from 3 provinces in South Africa who received regimens containing bedaquiline. We performed rigorous cardiac monitoring, including electrocardiograms (ECGs) performed in triplicate at four time points during bedaquiline therapy. Participants were followed until the end of therapy or 24 months. Outcomes included final tuberculosis treatment outcome and QT-prolongation, defined as any QTcF>500 ms or an absolute change from baseline (△ QTcF) >60 ms.

Results: We enrolled 195 eligible participants, of whom 40% had extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB. Most participants (97%) received concurrent clofazimine. 74% of participants were cured or successfully completed treatment, and outcomes did not differ by HIV status. QTcF continued to increase throughout bedaquiline therapy, with a mean increase of 23.7 (SD 22.7) ms from baseline to month 6. Four participants experienced a QTcF>500 ms and 19 experienced a △QTcF>60 ms. Older age was independently associated with QT-prolongation. QT-prolongation was neither more common nor severe in participants receiving concurrent lopinavir-ritonavir.

Conclusions: Severe QT-prolongation was uncommon and did not require permanent discontinuation of either bedaquiline or clofazimine. Close QT-monitoring may be advisable in older patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciab335DOI Listing
April 2021

Linezolid resistance in patients with drug-resistant TB and treatment failure in South Africa.

J Antimicrob Chemother 2019 08;74(8):2377-2384

Wellcome Centre for Infectious Diseases Research in Africa, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.

Objectives: Limited data exist on clinical associations and genotypic correlates of linezolid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We aimed to describe mutations and clinical factors associated with phenotypic linezolid resistance from patients with drug-resistant TB at two public sector facilities in South Africa.

Methods: Adults and adolescents with treatment failure (culture positivity ≥4 months) on a linezolid-containing regimen were retrospectively identified. Phenotypic resistance, as defined by a linezolid MIC >1 mg/L, was assessed for retrieved isolates using broth microdilution. Targeted sequencing of rrl and rplC was performed, irrespective of growth on subculture.

Results: Thirty-nine patients with linezolid-based treatment failure were identified, 13 (33%) of whom had phenotypic or genotypic linezolid resistance after a median duration of 22 months (range = 7-32) of linezolid therapy. Paired MIC testing and genotyping was performed on 55 unique isolates. All isolates with phenotypic resistance (n = 16) were associated with known resistance mutations, most frequently due to the T460C substitution in rplC (n = 10); rrl mutations included G2814T, G2270C/T and A2810C. No mutations were detected in isolates with MICs at or below the critical concentration.

Conclusions: Linezolid resistance occurred in a third of patients with drug-resistant TB and treatment failure. Resistance occurred late and was predicted by a limited number of mutations in rrl and rplC. Screening for genotypic resistance should be considered for patients with a positive culture after 4 months of linezolid therapy in order to optimize treatment and avoid the toxicity of ineffective linezolid therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkz206DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6640298PMC
August 2019