Publications by authors named "Lily N Trinh"

6 Publications

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Deciphering the Risk of Developing Second Primary Thyroid Cancer Following a Primary Malignancy-Who Is at the Greatest Risk?

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Mar 19;13(6). Epub 2021 Mar 19.

Department of Surgery, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70032, USA.

Background: It is critical to understand factors that may contribute to an increased risk of SPTC in order to develop surveillance protocols in high-risk individuals. This systematic review and meta-analysis will assess the association between primary malignancy and SPTC.

Methods: A search of PubMed and Embase databases was completed in April 2020. Inclusion criteria included studies that reported the incidence or standardized incidence ratio of any primary malignancy and SPTC, published between 1980-2020. The PRISMA guidelines were followed and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess quality of studies.

Results: 40 studies were included, which were comprised of 1,613,945 patients and 15 distinct types of primary cancers. In addition, 4196 (0.26%) patients developed SPTC following a mean duration of 8.07 ± 4.39 years. Greater risk of developing SPTC was found following primary breast (56.6%, 95%CI, 44.3-68.9, < 0.001), renal cell (12.2%, 95%CI, 7.68-16.8, < 0.001), basal cell (7.79%, 95%CI, 1.79-13.7, = 0.011), and ovarian cancer (11.4%, 95%CI, 3.4-19.5, = 0.005). SPTC patients were more likely to be females (RR = 1.58, 95%CI, 1.2-2.01, < 0.001) and Caucasians ( < 0.001).

Conclusions: Surveillance protocols should be considered for patients at a higher risk of SPTC, including those with primary breast, renal cell, basal cell and ovarian cancers who are female and/or Caucasian.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13061402DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8003482PMC
March 2021

Non-Hyaluronic Acid Fillers for Midface Augmentation: A Systematic Review.

Facial Plast Surg 2021 Mar 1. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Surgery, St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Brighton, Massachusetts.

There has been an increasing role in the use of injectable fillers for rejuvenation of the aging face. In this systematic review, we aim to evaluate the existing literature related to soft tissue fillers of the midface. Specifically, we focus on the non-hyaluronic acid fillers including polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), calcium hydroxyapatite (CaHA), and autologous fat. A systematic review was conducted in November 2020 in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines with PubMed and Embase databases. Medical Subject Headings terms used were "cheek" OR "midface" OR "malar" and "filler" OR "poly-L-lactic acid" OR "calcium hydroxyapatite," "autologous fat" OR "polymethylmethacrylate" OR "Artefill" OR "Bellafill" OR "Radiesse" OR "Sculptra." The initial search identified 271 articles. After 145 duplicates were removed, 126 studies were screened for relevance by title and abstract. A total of 114 studies were eliminated based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twelve articles underwent full-text review. Seven articles were included in the final analysis consisting of four non-hyaluronic filler products: PMMA, PLLA, CaHA, autologous fat. Most patients were highly satisfied with their results. Due to the gradual volumizing effects of PMMA, PLLA, and CaHA, patient satisfaction generally improved over time. Minor adverse reactions related to treatment included bruising, swelling, and pain. Nodule formation was reported in PLLA and CaHA studies. For autologous fat, 32% of the original injection volume remained at 16 months post-treatment, which still provided clinically improved malar enhancement. Dermal fillers are an attractive treatment option for the aging face due to their high patient satisfaction, long-lasting effects, and low side-effect profile. Patients should be appropriately counseled on the delayed effects of non-HA fillers. Autologous fat is a good option in many patients with the major drawback of unpredictable longevity, which may require a secondary procedure. Future studies should examine the longevity and long-term side effects of these fillers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1725164DOI Listing
March 2021

Hyaluronic Acid Fillers for Midface Augmentation: A Systematic Review.

Facial Plast Surg 2021 Feb 25. Epub 2021 Feb 25.

Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Surgery, St. Elizabeth's Medical Center, Brighton, Massachusetts.

Injectable fillers represent one of the most requested minimally invasive treatments to rejuvenate the aging face, and its popularity is steadily rising. A vast majority of filler treatments are with hyaluronic acid (HA). The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate patient outcomes, safety profile, and administration techniques of various HA fillers for malar augmentation. A systematic review of the published literature was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines and included PubMed, Embase, and Science Direct databases. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms used were "cheek" OR "midface" OR "malar" and "filler" OR "hyaluronic acid" OR "Juvederm" OR "Restylane" OR "Perlane" OR "Belotero." The initial search identified 699 articles; 256 duplicates were removed. Additional 12 studies were identified from reference lists. A total of 455 were screened by title and abstract and 387 studies were eliminated based on criteria. Also, 68 articles underwent full-text review, and 18 articles were included in the final review and involved seven different HA formulations. Men and women from many age groups were highly satisfied with their results following HA treatment for midface augmentation up to 24 months. The most common adverse events included bruising, swelling, and tenderness, and typically lasted no more than 2 weeks. Upper cheek filler injections near the zygoma should be placed in the submuscular plane while lower cheek injections should be placed in the subcutaneous tissue. HA is an attractive choice for midface augmentation due to its high patient satisfaction, long-lasting effects, and low side-effect profile. Due to the variability in technique, level of expertise, and subjective measurements across studies, one optimal regimen could not be concluded. However, midface augmentation treatment should be personalized to each patient. Additional clinical trials are required to more conclusively determine the most appropriate approach for this procedure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1724122DOI Listing
February 2021

Factors Influencing Female Medical Students' Decision to Pursue Surgical Specialties: A Systematic Review.

J Surg Educ 2020 Sep 12. Epub 2020 Sep 12.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Introduction: Gender inequality within the medical field continues to be a prominent issue, particularly for surgical specialties. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the factors that influence female medical students' decision to pursue a career in surgery, including general surgery and surgical subspecialties.

Methods: A literature search was conducted by 2 independent researchers searching PubMed, Embase, Medline, Web of Science, and Science Direct databases, in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Keywords included "female," "medical students," "surgery," "gender," "career," "surgical subspecialty," "plastic surgery," "otolaryngology," "neurosurgery," "orthopedics," and "urology." Studies evaluating factors that influenced female medical students' decision to pursuing surgical specialties were identified.

Results: The initial search identified 2200 articles. Five hundred twenty-seven duplicates were removed, and 1993 studies were eliminated based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Sixty-one articles underwent full-text review. Twenty-six additional studies were identified from references. A total of 14 articles were included in the review. Female medical students were positively influenced by mentorship, intellectual challenge, the rewarding nature of surgery, and specialty exposure. Gender discrimination, surgical lifestyle, and societal and cultural barriers were deterrents for female medical students. Compared to male, females minimized the importance of prestige and expected financial rewards.

Conclusions: This systematic review identifies mentorship, specialty exposure, nature of the surgical field, gender discrimination, and personal factors to be major determinants in female medical students' decisions to pursue a career in surgery. While factors such as inherent interest in surgery may not be easily modified, improvements in gender discrimination, access to mentorship, and specialty exposure can attract more female trainees to surgical specialties. Specifically, improving parental leave policies, reducing pregnancy-related stigma, eliminating gender-discrimination, matching medical students with role models early, and implementing outreach programs designed for women may increase students' interest in a surgical career.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsurg.2020.08.050DOI Listing
September 2020

The Influence of Psychological Factors on the Incidence and Severity of Sports-Related Concussions: A Systematic Review.

Am J Sports Med 2020 May 8;48(6):1516-1525. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Background: An athlete's preexisting psychological factors may influence the incidence and/or severity of sports-related concussions (SRCs).

Purpose: To determine if emotional states, personality traits, temperament, life stressors, and explanatory styles (optimism vs pessimism) influence the incidence and severity of SRCs in athletes.

Study Design: Systematic review.

Methods: A systematic literature search of multiple major medical reference databases was performed following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Studies were included that evaluated the effect of preexisting psychological factors on the incidence and severity of SRCs in male and female athletes participating in all sports.

Results: The initial search identified 1195 articles. Ten studies met our inclusion criteria and were included in our analysis. Factors such as meanness, aggression, and psychoticism were associated with an increased incidence of SRCs. Baseline traits of irritability, sadness, nervousness, and depressive symptoms were associated with worse symptomatology after SRCs. In young athletes, preexisting psychiatric illnesses, family history of psychiatric illness, and significant life stressors were associated with an increased risk of developing postconcussion syndrome after SRCs.

Conclusion: This systematic review demonstrated a potential relationship between an athlete's preexisting psychological factors and the incidence and severity of SRCs. These associations are not entirely clear owing to the heterogeneity across included studies and the low-to-moderate certainty of evidence. Future studies should attempt to evaluate men and women independently, use well-validated psychological questionnaires, and limit the usage of self-reported SRCs, when possible. Furthermore, the potential efficacy of baseline psychological factor and/or symptom reports on the prevention and management of SRCs should be explored.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546519882626DOI Listing
May 2020

Primer on adult patient satisfaction in perioperative settings.

Perioper Med (Lond) 2019 19;8:11. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

1Center on Stress & Health, University of California School of Medicine, Irvine, USA.

The topic of patient satisfaction has gained increasing importance over the past decade. Due to the impact of patient satisfaction on health care quality, understanding factors that predict satisfaction is vital. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature and identify factors related to patient perioperative satisfaction as well as predictive variables that, if modified, can enhance satisfaction scores of patients undergoing surgery. Our review reports that patient satisfaction scores are affected by modifiable factors such as clinician-patient communication, information provision to patients, and operational function of a hospital. Non-modifiable factors affecting patient satisfaction scores include patient demographics such as gender, age, and education. In order to enhance patient perioperative satisfaction, we suggest that anesthesiologists and surgeons focus their efforts on enhancing their communication skills and providing information that is appropriately tailored to the understanding of their patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13741-019-0122-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6751608PMC
September 2019