Publications by authors named "Liliana Nappi"

5 Publications

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Dermatographism and urticaria in a pediatric population.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2020 04 23;31(3):318-320. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Allergy Unit, Department of pediatrics, Anna Meyer Children's University Hospital, Florence, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pai.13209DOI Listing
April 2020

Chronic Diarrhea in Common Variable Immunodeficiency: a Case Series and Review of the Literature.

J Clin Immunol 2018 01 14;38(1):67-76. Epub 2017 Nov 14.

Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Center for Basic and Clinical Immunology Research (CISI), University of Naples Federico II, Via S. Pansini 5, 80131, Naples, Italy.

Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by reduced immunoglobulin serum levels and absent or impaired antibody production. Clinical manifestations, including infections, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and malignancies, also involve various segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic diarrhea is one of the most common gastrointestinal symptoms and may cause a wide spectrum of potentially life-threatening conditions as malabsorption and protein-energy malnutrition. We describe three female CVID adult patients presenting with chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and protein-energy malnutrition due to different underlying conditions. Our review of the literature explores the various gastrointestinal involvements in CVID and points out several histopathological findings proper of the disease, thus highlighting the relevance of the endoscopic and histological assessment in CVID patients presenting with chronic diarrhea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-017-0461-zDOI Listing
January 2018

Severe Hypothyroidism due to the Loss of Therapeutic Efficacy of l-Thyroxine in a Patient with Esophageal Complication Associated with Systemic Sclerosis.

Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2017 20;8:241. Epub 2017 Sep 20.

Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy.

Background: Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases as systemic sclerosis (SSc). Serum TSH levels are higher in SSc patients with more severe skin diseases and a worse modified Rodnan skin score. Asymptomatic esophageal involvement due to SSc has never been described as a cause of severe hypothyroidism due to l-thyroxine (l-T4) malabsorption in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and SSc.

Case Report: Here, we report a case of a 56-year-old female affected by both SSc and HT who developed severe hypothyroidism due to the loss of therapeutic efficacy of l-T4. Therapeutic failure resulted from the altered l-T4 absorption because of SSc esophageal complications. Clinical findings improved after the administration of oral liquid l-T4. Thyroid function completely normalized with a full clinical recovery, the disappearance of the pericardial effusion and the improvement of the pulmonary pressure.

Conclusion: A recognition of a poor absorption is crucial in patients with hypothyroidism and SSc to reduce the risk of the subsequent adverse events. This case suggests the importance of clinical and laboratory surveillance in patients with SSc and HT because the systemic complications of these dysfunctions may worsen the prognosis of hypothyroid SSc/HT patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2017.00241DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5611405PMC
September 2017

Rapid infusions of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l are safe and well tolerated in immunodeficiencies and immune thrombocytopenia.

Int Immunopharmacol 2017 Mar 7;44:38-42. Epub 2017 Jan 7.

Department of Molecular Medicine, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Italy.

Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is accepted as an effective and well-tolerated treatment for primary and secondary immunodeficiencies (ID) and immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Adverse reactions of IVIg are usually mild, comprising transient flu-like symptoms, change in blood pressure and tachycardia. However IVIg therapy can be burdensome for both patients and healthcare facilities, since the infusion may take up to 4h to administer. The objective of our multicentre, prospective, open-label phase III trial was to evaluate the tolerability and safety of human normal immunoglobulin 50g/l (Ig VENA) at high intravenous infusion rates in adult patients with ID and ITP who had previously tolerated IVIg treatment, by progressively increasing infusion rate up to 8ml/kg/hr. 39 ID patients received three infusions, 5 ITP patients received up to a maximum of 5 infusions for a maximum of 5days. Overall 55 adverse events were reported in 18 patients, and all were mild and self-limiting. Two serious adverse events occurred in ID patients and 1 in an ITP patient; none was fatal or treatment-related. No clinically significant changes or abnormalities were observed in vital signs, laboratory results and HRQoL. In summary, in this study, more rapid IVIg infusions were well tolerated by ID and ITP patients, while maintaining their quality of life, helping to minimise the time spent in outpatient hospital visiting to potentially optimise adherence to treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2016.12.030DOI Listing
March 2017