Publications by authors named "Liliana G Bordeianou"

66 Publications

Zip Code-Related Income Disparities in Patients with Colorectal Cancer.

Am Surg 2021 Jun 8:31348211023435. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, 2348Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Introduction: Screening and early detection reduce morbidity and mortality in colorectal cancer. Our aim is to study the effect of income disparities on the clinical characteristics of patients with colorectal cancer in Massachusetts.

Methods: Patients were extracted from a database containing all surgically treated colorectal cancers between 2004 and 2015 at a tertiary hospital in Massachusetts. We split patients into 2 groups: "above-median income" and "below-median income" according to the median income of Massachusetts ($74,167).

Results: The analysis included 817 patients. The above-median income group consisted of 528 patients (65%) and the below-median income group consisted of 289 patients (35%). The mean age of presentation was 64 ± 15 years for the above-median income group and 67 ± 15 years for the below-median income group ( = .04). Patients with below-median income were screened less often ( < .001) and presented more frequently with metastatic disease ( = .02). Patients with above-median income survived an estimated 15 months longer than those with below-median income ( < .001). The survival distribution was statistically significantly different between the groups for stage III disease ( = .004), but not stages I, II, or IV ( = 1, 1, and .2, respectively). For stage III disease, a lower proportion of below-median income patients received chemotherapy (61% vs. 79%, = .002) and a higher proportion underwent nonelective surgery (5% vs. 2%, = .007).

Conclusions: In Massachusetts, patients with colorectal cancer residing in lower income areas are screened less, received adjuvant chemotherapy less, and have worse outcomes, especially when analyzing those who present with stage III disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/00031348211023435DOI Listing
June 2021

Urinary symptoms in women with faecal incontinence.

Colorectal Dis 2021 May 4. Epub 2021 May 4.

Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Aim: Faecal incontinence (FI) is estimated to affect 8.9% of women in the United States, with a significant impact on quality of life. Our aim was to compare urinary symptoms in patients with and without FI with different degrees of severity.

Methods: This prospective cohort of women presented for care at a pelvic floor disorder centre between May 2007 and January 2019. We excluded women with a history of bowel resection, prior history of pelvic organ prolapse surgery or existing prolapse symptoms reported by the patient during intake. The primary outcome was the presence of urinary symptoms in women with and without FI by validated questionnaires. A logistic regression model for association of urinary symptoms with FI was performed, adjusting for age, smoking, diabetes, prior hysterectomy and irritable bowel syndrome.

Results: A total of 2932 met inclusion criteria, and of these 1404 (47.89%) reported FI. In the univariate analysis, patients with FI were more likely to have urgency urinary incontinence (P = 0.01) or mixed urinary incontinence (P < 0.001), report nocturnal enuresis (P < 0.001) or have leakage of urine during sex (P < 0.001). In an adjusted model, FI was associated with concurrent stress (adjusted OR 1.28, P = 0.034), urgency (adjusted OR 1.52, P < 0.001) and mixed incontinence (adjusted OR 1.94, P < 0.001).

Conclusion: In women with pelvic floor disorders, the presence of FI is associated with a higher prevalence of urinary incontinence. Pelvic floor specialists should assess urinary incontinence symptoms along with the presence and severity of FI to provide comprehensive care and guide appropriate therapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/codi.15703DOI Listing
May 2021

Delay to Intervention for Complicated Diverticulitis is Associated with Higher Inpatient Mortality.

J Gastrointest Surg 2021 Mar 16. Epub 2021 Mar 16.

Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 15 Parkman Street, WACC 460, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.

Background: Patients with diverticular disease complicated by abscess and/or perforation represent the most severely afflicted with the highest mortality and poorest outcomes. This study investigated patient and operative factors associated with poor outcomes from diverticulitis complicated by abscess or perforation.

Methods: We analyzed the National Inpatient Sample to identify inpatient discharges for colonic diverticulitis in the United States from 1/1988 to 9/2015. We identified patients with perforation and/or intestinal abscess based on ICD-9 codes. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality.

Results: During the study period, a total of 993,220 patients were discharged with diverticulitis from sampled U.S. hospitals. From this group, 10.7% had an abscess and 1.0% had a perforation associated with diverticular disease. Inpatient mortality of diverticulitis patients with a perforation was 5.4% compared to 1.5% in those without a perforation (p<0.001). Patients with a perforation who underwent surgery had an inpatient mortality of 6.3% vs. 3.0% mortality amongst patients with a perforation who did not undergo an operation (p<0.001). Patients with a perforation that underwent surgery had a 31% increased mortality risk for each day after admission that a procedure was delayed (OR 1.31, CI 1.05-1.78; p=0.03). Mortality risk was increased for patients with either abscess or perforation who underwent surgery if they were female, age ≥65, higher comorbidity, were admitted urgently, underwent peritoneal lavage, or had a post-procedural complication.

Conclusions: Patients with perforated diverticular disease had substantial associated inpatient mortality compared to those with uncomplicated diverticulitis. This increased risk may be associated with performance of peritoneal lavage or because of a delay to procedural intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11605-021-04972-9DOI Listing
March 2021

Metrics Used to Quantify Fecal Incontinence and Constipation.

Clin Colon Rectal Surg 2021 Jan 28;34(1):5-14. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

While fecal incontinence and constipation can be measured through physiological testing, the subjective experience of severity and impact on health-related quality of life lead to both being most effectively captured through patient-reported measures. Patient-reported measures of severity and impact help to determine baseline symptoms, guide clinical decision making, and compare various treatments. Here, we take pause to review the psychometric qualities that make effective instruments, and discuss some of the most commonly used instruments along with the reasons behind their use. In addition, we highlight the benefits of a standardized instrument designed to evaluate the major symptoms of patients presenting with pelvic floor disorders (including fecal incontinence and constipation). Ultimately, we aim to provide guidance in choosing appropriate instruments for clinical and research use.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1714245DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7843947PMC
January 2021

Are There Variations in Mortality From Diverticular Disease By Sex?

Dis Colon Rectum 2020 09;63(9):1285-1292

Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Previous data reveal that females account for a disproportionate majority of all patients diagnosed with diverticulitis.

Objective: This study analyzed the variation in mortality from diverticular disease by sex.

Design: This was a nationwide retrospective cohort study.

Settings: Data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-Ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research national registry.

Patients: All citizens of the United States who died from an underlying cause of death of diverticulitis between January 1999 and December 2016 were included.

Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome addressed was overall mortality rate of diverticulitis by sex. Secondary outcomes included pattern variances in demographics and secondary causes of death.

Results: During the study period, 55,096 patients (0.12%) died with an underlying cause of death of diverticulitis from a total of 44,915,066 deaths. Compared with other causes, females were disproportionally more likely to die from diverticulitis than males (0.17% females vs 0.08% males; p < 0.001). Age-adjusted incidence of death was higher for females compared with males. Female patients were less likely to die within the hospital compared with males (OR = 0.72 (95% CI, 0.69-0.75); p < 0.001). Conversely, female patients were more likely to die either at nursing homes or hospice facilities (OR = 1.64 (95% CI, 1.55-1.73); p < 0.001). In addition, females with an underlying cause of death of diverticulitis were less likely to have a surgical complication as their secondary cause of death (OR = 0.72 (95% CI, 0.66-0.78); p < 0.001) but more likely to have nonsurgical complications related to diverticulitis such as sepsis (OR = 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01-1.05); p < 0.03), nonsurgical GI disorders such as obstruction (OR = 1.16 (95% CI, 1.09-1.24); p < 0.001), or chronic pelvic fistulizing disease (OR = 1.43 (95% CI, 1.23-1.66); p < 0.001).

Limitations: The study was limited by a lack of more specific clinical data.

Conclusions: Females have a higher incidence of diverticular disease mortality. Their deaths are more commonly secondary to nonsurgical infections, obstruction, or pelvic fistulae. Female patients represent a particularly vulnerable population that may benefit from more intensive diverticulitis evaluation. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B257. ¿EXISTEN VARIACIONES EN LA MORTALIDAD POR ENFERMEDAD DIVERTICULAR POR GÉNERO?: Los datos anteriores revelan que las mujeres representan una mayoría desproporcionada de todos los pacientes diagnosticados con diverticulitis.Este estudio analizó la variación en la mortalidad por enfermedad diverticular por género.Estudio de cohorte retrospectivo a nivel nacional.Los datos se obtuvieron del registro nacional WONDER del Centro de Control de Enfermedades.Se incluyeron todos los ciudadanos de los Estados Unidos que murieron por una causa subyacente de muerte (UCOD por sus siglas en inglés) de diverticulitis del 1 / 1999-12 / 2016.El resultado primario abordado fue la tasa de mortalidad general de la diverticulitis por género. Los resultados secundarios incluyeron variaciones de patrones en la demografía y causas secundarias de muerte.Falta de datos clínicos más específicos.Durante el período de estudio, 55.096 pacientes (0,12%) murieron con un UCOD de diverticulitis de un total de 44.915.066 muertes. En comparación con otras causas, las mujeres tenían una probabilidad desproporcionadamente mayor de morir de diverticulitis que los hombres (0.17% F vs. 0.08% M, p <0.001). La incidencia de muerte ajustada por edad fue mayor para las mujeres que para los hombres. Las pacientes femeninas tenían menos probabilidades de morir en el hospital en comparación con los hombres (OR 0.72, IC 0.69-0.75, p <0.001). Por el contrario, las pacientes femeninas tenían más probabilidades de morir en asilos de ancianos o en centros de cuidados paliativos (OR 1.64, IC 1.55-1.73, p <0.001). Además, las mujeres con una UCOD de diverticulitis tenían menos probabilidades de tener una complicación quirúrgica como causa secundaria de muerte (OR 0.72, CI 0.66-0.78, p <0.001) pero más probabilidades de tener complicaciones no quirúrgicas relacionadas con la diverticulitis, como sepsis (OR 1.04, CI 1.01-1.05, p <0.03), trastornos gastrointestinales no quirúrgicos como obstrucción (OR 1.16, CI 1.09-1.24, p <0.001), o enfermedad fistulizante pélvica crónica (OR 1.43, CI 1.23-1.66, p <0,001).Las mujeres tienen una mayor incidencia de mortalidad por enfermedad diverticular. Sus muertes son más comúnmente secundarias a infecciones no quirúrgicas, obstrucción o fístulas pélvicas. Las pacientes femeninas representan una población particularmente vulnerable que puede beneficiarse de una evaluación más intensiva de diverticulitis. Consulte Video Resumen en http://links.lww.com/DCR/B257.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001711DOI Listing
September 2020

The Authors Reply.

Dis Colon Rectum 2020 12;63(12):e593

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001841DOI Listing
December 2020

Infiltrating Tumor Border Configuration is a Poor Prognostic Factor in Stage II and III Colon Adenocarcinoma.

Ann Surg Oncol 2021 Jun 26;28(6):3408-3414. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Division of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Introduction: Tumor border configuration (TBC) is a prognostic factor in colorectal adenocarcinoma; however, the significance of TBC is not well-documented in colon adenocarcinoma alone.

Objective: Our aim was to study the effect of TBC on overall and disease-free survival in stage II and III colon adenocarcinoma.

Methods: We included patients with stage II and III colon adenocarcinoma who were surgically treated at a tertiary medical center between 2004 and 2015, to ensure long-term follow-up. Patients were stratified into four groups based on stage and TBC. A Cox regression was used to model the relationship of groups while accounting for relevant confounders.

Results: The cohort consisted of 700 patients (371 stage II and 329 stage III). Infiltrating TBC was statistically significantly associated with stage (p < 0.001) and extramural vascular invasion (p < 0.001), but not histologic grade (p = 0.7). Compared with pushing TBC, infiltrating TBC increased the hazard of death by a factor of 1.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-2.4; p < 0.001] and 1.7 (95% CI 1.3-2.2; p < 0.001). The hazard of death in patients with stage II disease (infiltrating TBC) or stage III disease (pushing TBC) was not significantly different (adjusted hazard ratio 1.1, 95% CI 0.7-1.7; p = 0.8).

Conclusion: Infiltrating TBC is a high-risk feature in patients with stage II and III colon adenocarcinoma. Stage II disease patients with infiltrating TBC and who are node-negative should be considered for adjuvant chemotherapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-020-09281-0DOI Listing
June 2021

Octogenarians present with a less aggressive phenotype of colon adenocarcinoma.

Surgery 2020 12 9;168(6):1138-1143. Epub 2020 Oct 9.

Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

Background: Octogenarians constitute a growing percentage of patients diagnosed with colon malignancies. This study aims to determine if the clinical and pathologic presentation of octogenarians with colon cancer differs from that of patients diagnosed at a younger age.

Methods: Data were collected retrospectively for all patients diagnosed with colon cancer who underwent resection at a single institution between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2017; patients with rectal cancer were excluded. Patients were categorized by age at diagnosis: either 50 to 79 years of age or ≥80 years of age; those <50 years of age were excluded because of the greater risk of a hereditary etiology. The primary outcome was the correlation between patient age and pathologic features of the tumor, including tumor size, lymph node metastases, perineural invasion, and extramural venous invasion.

Results: Of 1,301 patients, 329 (25%) were ≥80. Female patients predominated the octogenarian cohort (61% vs 39%; P < .001). Octogenarians presented with larger tumors when compared to patients age 50 to 79 (5.2 cm vs 4.5 cm; P < .001). More patients ≥80 had tumors which were >8 cm (17.3% vs 8.9%; P < .001). Tumors in younger patients were more often detected on screening colonoscopy (23.1% vs 7.3%; P < .001). Regardless of tumor size, octogenarians were less likely to have positive lymph nodes than younger patients (P = .02). In addition, octogenarians were less likely to exhibit extramural venous invasion compared to younger patients across all tumor sizes (P < .001). Younger patients had greater median overall survival (6.4 years vs 4.4 years; P < .001), yet 3-year disease-free survival was comparable between age groups (P = .12).

Conclusion: Octogenarians with colon cancer present with larger tumors but appear to have less aggressive disease, as reflected in a lower pathologic stage, less extramural venous invasion, and less lymph node metastases, than younger patients with similar size tumors. Three-year disease-free survival is comparable between octogenarians and patients aged 50 to 79.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2020.08.025DOI Listing
December 2020

Ten-year survival after pathologic complete response in rectal adenocarcinoma.

J Surg Oncol 2021 Jan 6;123(1):293-298. Epub 2020 Oct 6.

Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Multimodal treatment is the standard of care for rectal adenocarcinoma, with a subset of patients achieving a pathologic complete response (pCR). While pCR is associated with improved overall survival (OS), long-term data on patients with pCR is limited.

Methods: This is a single institution retrospective cohort study of all patients with clinical stages II/III rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and operative resection (January 1, 2004-December 31, 2017). PCR was defined as no tumor identified in the rectum or associated lymph nodes by final pathology.

Results: Of 370 patients in this cohort, 50 had a pCR (13.5%). For pCR patients, 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 92%, 5-year OS was 95%. Twenty-six patients had surgery > 10 years before the study end date, of which 20 had an OS > 10 years (77%) with median OS 12.1 years and 95% alive to date (19/20). Of the 50 pCR patients, there was a single recurrence in the lung at 44.3 months after proctectomy which was surgically resected.

Conclusion: For patients with rectal adenocarcinoma that undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation and surgical resection, pCR is associated with excellent long-term DFS and OS. Many patients live greater than 10 years with no evidence of disease recurrence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.26247DOI Listing
January 2021

Adjuvant Chemotherapy Benefits on Patients with Extramural Vascular Invasion in Stages II and III Colon Cancer.

J Gastrointest Surg 2021 Aug 2;25(8):2019-2025. Epub 2020 Oct 2.

Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Introduction: Extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) is a poor prognostic factor in colon cancer. However, the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with EMVI is not well defined. The objective of this study is to determine if there is a survival benefit for using adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with EMVI-positive colon cancers.

Methods: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with stages II and III colon adenocarcinoma who underwent surgical resection between 2004 and 2015. Cox regression was used to determine the effect of chemotherapy on EMVI-positive patients while adjusting for the extent of invasion, regional lymph node metastasis, histologic grade, age, site of tumor, and ASA score.

Results: A total of 750 patients were included in this study. Extramural vascular invasion was present in 93 out of 387 stage II patients (24%) and 187 out of 363 stage III patients (52%). The Cox regression model showed that in patients with EMVI, those who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy had a 1.6-fold (1.1-2.3) increase in the hazard of death compared with those who received chemotherapy.

Conclusions: Patients who were EMVI-negative fared better than those who were EMVI-positive. In patients who were EMVI-positive, adjuvant chemotherapy improved overall survival.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11605-020-04810-4DOI Listing
August 2021

A multi-center analysis of cumulative inpatient opioid use in colorectal surgery patients.

Am J Surg 2020 11 2;220(5):1160-1166. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Colorectal Surgery Center, Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA. Electronic address:

Background: There are little data on risk factors for increased inpatient opioid use and its relationship with persistent opioid use after colorectal surgery.

Methods: We identified colorectal surgery patients across five collaborating institutions. Patient comorbidities, surgery data, and outcomes were captured in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. We recorded preoperative opioid exposure, inpatient opioid use, and persistent use 90-180 days after surgery.

Results: 1646 patients were analyzed. Patients receiving ≥250 MMEs (top quartile) were included in the high use group. On multivariable analysis, age <65, emergent surgery, inflammatory bowel disease, and postoperative complications, but not prior opioid exposure, were predictive of high opioid use. Patients in the top quartile of use had an increased risk of persistent opioid use (19.8% vs. 9.7%, p < 0.001), which persisted on multivariable analysis (OR 1.48; p = 0.037).

Conclusions: We identified risk factors for high inpatient use that can be used to identify patients that may benefit from opioid sparing strategies. Furthermore, high postoperative inpatient use was associated with an increased risk of persistent opioid use.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2020.06.038DOI Listing
November 2020

Association of Time Between Radiation and Salvage APR and Margin Status in Patients With Anal Cancer Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation.

Am Surg 2020 Jun;86(6):703-714

2348 Section of Colon & Rectal Surgery, Division of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

There is a controversy regarding the optimal time to assess anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) response to chemoradiation and when salvage abdominoperineal resection (APR) should be offered. A retrospective cohort study was performed on patients with stage I-III anal SCC treated with chemoradiation in the National Cancer Database (2004-2015). The time between radiation and APR was recorded. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard analysis were used to determine predictors of resection margin status and overall survival. The cohort included 23 050 patients, of whom 545 (2.4%) underwent salvage APR. The median (IQR) time between radiation and resection was 3.8 (2.4-5.5) months. The rate of positive margins was 19.0%. Positive margins were more common in male, non-white patients with larger tumors, pathologic upstaging of T stage, and ≥3 months between chemoradiation and resection (all < .05). Observing for ≥3 months between chemoradiation and APR remained associated with positive margins, even after adjusting for pretreatment tumor size (odds ratio = 2.56, 95% CI 1.46-4.47). Our data, based on the largest published cohort of anal SCC patients treated with chemoradiation and subsequent APR, suggest that patients at high risk of local treatment failure, particularly non-white men with large tumors, may benefit from early interim restaging and earlier consideration of salvage surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003134820923326DOI Listing
June 2020

Development and evaluation of a patient-centred program for low anterior resection syndrome: protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

BMJ Open 2020 05 30;10(5):e035587. Epub 2020 May 30.

Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Introduction: Low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) is described as disordered bowel function after rectal resection that leads to a detriment in quality of life, and affects the majority of individuals following restorative proctectomy for rectal cancer. The management of LARS includes personalised troubleshooting and effective self-management behaviours. Thus, affected individuals need to be well informed and appropriately engaged in their own LARS management. This manuscript describes the development of a LARS patient-centred programme (LPCP) and the study protocol for its evaluation in a randomised controlled trial.

Methods And Analysis: This will be a multicentre, randomised, assessor-blind, parallel-groups, pragmatic trial evaluating the impact of an LPCP, consisting of an informational booklet, patient diaries and nurse support, on patient-reported outcomes after restorative proctectomy for rectal cancer. The informational booklet was developed by a multidisciplinary LARS team, and was vetted in a focus group and semistructured interviews involving patients, caregivers, and healthcare professionals. The primary outcome will be global quality of life (QoL), as measured by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30), at 6 months after surgery. The treatment effect on global QoL will be modelled using generalised estimating equations. Secondary outcomes include symptom change, patient activation, bowel function measures, emotional distress, knowledge about LARS and satisfaction with the LPCP.

Ethics And Dissemination: The Research Ethics Committee (REC) at the Integrated Health and Social Services Network for West-Central Montreal (health network responsible for the Jewish General Hospital) is the overseeing REC for all Quebec sites. They have granted ethical approval (MP-05-2019-1628) for all Quebec hospitals (Jewish General Hospital, McGill University Health Center, CHU de Quebec) and have granted full authorisation to begin research at the Jewish General Hospital. Patient recruitment will not begin at the other Quebec sites until inter-institutional contracts are finalised and feasibility/authorisation for research is granted by their respective REC. The results of this study will be presented at national and international conferences, and a manuscript with results will be submitted for publication in a high-impact peer-reviewed journal.

Trial Registration Number: NCT03828318; Pre-results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2019-035587DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7264642PMC
May 2020

International consensus definition of low anterior resection syndrome.

ANZ J Surg 2020 03 10;90(3):300-307. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Surgery, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background: Low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) is pragmatically defined as disordered bowel function after rectal resection leading to a detriment in quality of life. This broad characterization does not allow for precise estimates of prevalence. The LARS score was designed as a simple tool for clinical evaluation of LARS. Although the LARS score has good clinical utility, it may not capture all important aspects that patients may experience. The aim of this collaboration was to develop an international consensus definition of LARS that encompasses all aspects of the condition and is informed by all stakeholders.

Methods: This international patient-provider initiative used an online Delphi survey, regional patient consultation meetings and an international consensus meeting. Three expert groups participated: patients, surgeons and other health professionals from five regions (Australasia, Denmark, Spain, Great Britain and Ireland, and North America) and in three languages (English, Spanish and Danish). The primary outcome measured was the priorities for the definition of LARS.

Results: Three hundred and twenty-five participants (156 patients) registered. The response rates for successive rounds of the Delphi survey were 86%, 96% and 99%. Eighteen priorities emerged from the Delphi survey. Patient consultation and consensus meetings refined these priorities to eight symptoms and eight consequences that capture essential aspects of the syndrome. Sampling bias may have been present, in particular, in the patient panel because social media was used extensively in recruitment. There was also dominance of the surgical panel at the final consensus meeting despite attempts to mitigate this.

Conclusions: This is the first definition of LARS developed with direct input from a large international patient panel. The involvement of patients in all phases has ensured that the definition presented encompasses the vital aspects of the patient experience of LARS. The novel separation of symptoms and consequences may enable greater sensitivity to detect changes in LARS over time and with intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ans.15421DOI Listing
March 2020

International Consensus Definition of Low Anterior Resection Syndrome.

Dis Colon Rectum 2020 03;63(3):274-284

Department of Surgery, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background: Low anterior resection syndrome is pragmatically defined as disordered bowel function after rectal resection leading to a detriment in quality of life. This broad characterization does not allow for precise estimates of prevalence. The low anterior resection syndrome score was designed as a simple tool for clinical evaluation of low anterior resection syndrome. Although the low anterior resection syndrome score has good clinical utility, it may not capture all important aspects that patients may experience.

Objective: The aim of this collaboration was to develop an international consensus definition of low anterior resection syndrome that encompasses all aspects of the condition and is informed by all stakeholders.

Design: This international patient-provider initiative used an online Delphi survey, regional patient consultation meetings, and an international consensus meeting.

Participants: Three expert groups participated: patients, surgeons, and other health professionals from 5 regions (Australasia, Denmark, Spain, Great Britain and Ireland, and North America) and in 3 languages (English, Spanish, and Danish).

Main Outcome Measure: The primary outcome measured was the priorities for the definition of low anterior resection syndrome.

Results: Three hundred twenty-five participants (156 patients) registered. The response rates for successive rounds of the Delphi survey were 86%, 96%, and 99%. Eighteen priorities emerged from the Delphi survey. Patient consultation and consensus meetings refined these priorities to 8 symptoms and 8 consequences that capture essential aspects of the syndrome.

Limitations: Sampling bias may have been present, in particular, in the patient panel because social media was used extensively in recruitment. There was also dominance of the surgical panel at the final consensus meeting despite attempts to mitigate this.

Conclusions: This is the first definition of low anterior resection syndrome developed with direct input from a large international patient panel. The involvement of patients in all phases has ensured that the definition presented encompasses the vital aspects of the patient experience of low anterior resection syndrome. The novel separation of symptoms and consequences may enable greater sensitivity to detect changes in low anterior resection syndrome over time and with intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001583DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7034376PMC
March 2020

Bowel Function After J-Pouch May Be More Complex Than Previously Appreciated: A Comprehensive Analysis to Highlight Existing Knowledge Gaps.

Dis Colon Rectum 2020 02;63(2):207-216

Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Functional outcomes following J-pouch for ulcerative colitis have been studied, but lack standardization in which symptoms are reported. Furthermore, the selection of symptoms studied has not been patient centered.

Objective: This study aimed to utilize a validated bowel function survey to determine which symptoms are present after J-pouch creation, and whether patients display a functional profile similar to low anterior resection syndrome.

Design: This study is a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained single-center database.

Settings: This study was conducted at the colorectal surgery center of a tertiary care academic hospital PATIENTS:: Included were 159 patients with J-pouch, ≥6 months after ileostomy reversal.

Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcomes were individual answers to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Bowel Function Instrument. The original Bowel Function Instrument validation cohort was used as an historical comparison (n = 127).

Results: The mean total Bowel Function Instrument score for the J-pouch cohort was 59.9 ± 9.7 compared with a reported average score of 63.7 ± 11.6 for patients with low anterior resection in the validation cohort (p < 0.001), indicating worse bowel function in patients with J-pouch. When evaluating the Bowel Function Instrument subscales, patients with J-pouch reported frequency subscale scores of 18.2 ± 3.8, diet scores of 12.2 ± 3.8, and urgency scores of 15.9 ± 3.7, compared with 21.7 ± 4.5 (p < 0.001), 14.1 ± 3.7 (p < 0.001), and 15.0 ± 3.9 (p = 0.04) for patients undergoing rectal resection. Furthermore, 90.4% of patients with J-pouch state that they are sometimes, rarely, or never able to wait 15 minutes to get to the toilet. In addition, 56.4% of patients report having another bowel movement within 15 minutes of the last bowel movement, sometimes, always, or most of the time, and 50.6% of patients say that they sometimes, rarely, or never feel like their bowels have been totally emptied after a bowel movement.

Limitations: This study is limited because it took place at a single center and the Bowel Function Instrument was only validated for patients undergoing rectal resection.

Conclusions: Patients that undergo J-pouch surgery exhibit a constellation of bowel function symptoms that is more complex than fecal incontinence and frequency alone, despite the focus on these functional outcomes in the literature. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B73. LA FUNCIÓN INTESTINAL DESPUÉS DE LA BOLSA EN J PUEDE SER MÁS COMPLEJA DE LO QUE SE APRECIABA ANTERIORMENTE: UN ANÁLISIS EXHAUSTIVO PARA RESALTAR LAS BRECHAS DE CONOCIMIENTO EXISTENTES: Se han estudiado los resultados funcionales después de la bolsa en J para la colitis ulcerosa, pero carecen de estandarización en la que se informen los síntomas. Además, la selección de los síntomas estudiados no se ha centrado en el paciente.Utilizar una encuesta validada de la función intestinal para determinar qué síntomas están presentes después de la bolsa en J y si los pacientes muestran un perfil funcional similar al síndrome de resección anterior baja.Análisis retrospectivo de una base de datos de un solo centro mantenida prospectivamente.Centro de cirugía colorrectal de un hospital académico de atención terciaria.159 pacientes con bolsa en J, ≥6 meses después de la reversión de ileostomía.Instrumento para la función intestinal del "Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center"; cohorte de validación original de instrumentos de función intestinal utilizada como comparación histórica (n = 127).La puntuación media total del instrumento de función intestinal para la cohorte de bolsa J fue 59.9 ± 9.7 en comparación con un puntaje promedio reportado de 63.7 ± 11.6 para pacientes con resección anterior baja en la cohorte de validación (p < 0.001), lo que indica peor función intestinal en pacientes con bolsa en J. Al evaluar las subescalas del instrumento de función intestinal, los pacientes con bolsa en J informaron puntuaciones de subescala de frecuencia de 18.2 ± 3.8, puntuaciones de dieta de 12.2 ± 3.8 y puntuaciones de urgencia de 15.9 ± 3.7, en comparación con 21.7 ± 4.5 (p < 0.001), 14.1 ± 3.7 (p < 0.001) y 15.0 ± 3.9 (p = 0.04) respectivamente para pacientes con resección rectal. Además, el 90.4% de los pacientes con bolsa en J afirman que a veces, rara vez o nunca pueden esperar 15 minutos para llegar al baño. Además, el 56.4% de los pacientes reportan haber tenido otra evacuación intestinal dentro de los 15 minutos posteriores a la última evacuación intestinal, a veces, siempre o la mayor parte del tiempo, y el 50.6% de los pacientes dicen que a veces, rara vez o nunca sienten que sus intestinos han sido vaciados totalmente después de una evacuación intestinal.Estudio en un solo centro, instrumento de función intestinal validado solo para pacientes con resección rectalLos pacientes que se someten a una bolsa en J exhiben una constelación de síntomas de la función intestinal que es más compleja que la incontinencia fecal y la frecuencia sola, a pesar del enfoque en estos resultados funcionales en la literatura.Consulte Video Resumen en http://links.lww.com/DCR/B73. (Traducción-Dr. Gonzalo Federico Hagerman).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001543DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071733PMC
February 2020

Superior pathologic and clinical outcomes after minimally invasive rectal cancer resection, compared to open resection.

Surg Endosc 2020 08 16;34(8):3435-3448. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Yawkey 7B, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.

Background: While the ACOSOG and ALaCaRT trials found that laparoscopic resections for rectal cancer failed to demonstrate non-inferiority of pathologic outcomes when compared with open resections, the COLOR II and COREAN studies demonstrated non-inferiority of clinical outcomes, leading to uncertainty regarding the value of minimally invasive (MIS) techniques in rectal cancer surgery. We analyzed differences in pathologic and clinical outcomes between open versus MIS resections for rectal cancer.

Methods: We identified patients who underwent resection for stage II or III rectal adenocarcinoma from the National Cancer Database (2010-2015). Surgical approach was categorized as open or MIS (laparoscopic or robotic). Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard analysis were used to assess differences in outcomes and survival. Analysis was performed in an intention-to-treat fashion.

Results: A total of 31,190 patients who underwent rectal adenocarcinoma resection were identified, of whom 52.8% underwent open resection and 47.2% underwent MIS resection (31.0% laparoscopic, 16.2% robotic). After adjustment for patient, tumor, and institutional characteristics, MIS approaches were associated with significantly decreased risk of positive circumferential resection margins (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.72-0.94), increased likelihood of harvesting ≥ 12 lymph nodes (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.04-1.21), shorter length of stay (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.53-0.62), and improved overall survival (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.98).

Conclusions: MIS approaches to rectal cancer resection were associated with improved pathologic and clinical outcomes when compared to the open approach. In this nationwide, facility-based sample of cancer cases in the United States, our data suggest superiority of MIS techniques for rectal cancer treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-019-07120-2DOI Listing
August 2020

Implementation of liposomal bupivacaine transversus abdominis plane blocks into the colorectal enhanced recovery after surgery protocol: a natural experiment.

Int J Colorectal Dis 2020 Jan 4;35(1):133-138. Epub 2019 Dec 4.

Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs are now standard of care for colorectal surgery. Efforts have been aimed at decreasing postoperative opioid consumption. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effect of liposomal bupivacaine transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks on opioid use and its downstream effect on rates of ileus and hospital length of stay (LOS).

Methods: We performed a retrospective pre- and postintervention time-trend analysis (2016-2018) of ERAS patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery at two academic medical centers within the same hospital system. The intervention was liposomal bupivacaine TAP blocks versus standard local infiltration with bupivacaine with a primary outcome of total morphine milligram equivalents (MME) administered within 72 h of surgery. Secondary outcomes included hospital LOS and rate of postoperative ileus.

Results: There were 556 patients included at the control hospital, and 384 patients were included at the treatment hospital. Patients at both hospitals were similar with regard to age, body mass index, comorbidities, and surgical indication. In an adjusted time-trend analysis, the treatment hospital was associated with a significant decrease in MME administered (- 15.9 mg, p = 0.04) and hospital LOS (- 0.8 days, p < 0.001). There was no significant decrease in the rate of ileus at the treatment hospital (- 6.9%, p = 0.08).

Conclusions: In a time-trend analysis, the addition of liposomal bupivacaine TAP blocks into the ERAS protocol resulted in significantly reduced opioid use and shorter hospital LOS for patients undergoing surgery at the treatment hospital. Liposomal bupivacaine TAP blocks should be considered for inclusion in the standard ERAS protocol.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00384-019-03457-1DOI Listing
January 2020

High Risk of Proximal and Local Neoplasms in 2206 Patients With Anogenital Extramammary Paget's Disease.

Dis Colon Rectum 2019 11;62(11):1283-1293

Section of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Division of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Extramammary Paget's disease is an uncommon intraepidermal adenocarcinoma with poorly defined clinical implications.

Objective: The purpose of this research was to estimate the risk of second primary neoplasms in patients with extramammary Paget's disease.

Design: This was a retrospective analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry (1973-2014).

Settings: The study included population-based cancer registries from the United States.

Patients: Patients who were diagnosed with anogenital Paget's disease were included.

Main Outcome Measures: Risk of second primary development was measured.

Results: We identified 108 patients with anal Paget's disease, 421 patients with male genital (scrotum or penis) Paget's, and 1677 patients with female genital (vagina or vulva) Paget's. Median follow-up time was 5.9 years. The risk of developing colorectal adenocarcinoma was 18.5% for patients with anal Paget's disease. Eighty percent of colorectal adenocarcinoma diagnoses were synchronous (within 2 mo) to anal Paget's diagnoses, whereas metachronous tumors occurred at a median time of 2.4 years. Of patients with anal Paget's disease, 8.3% developed an anal adenocarcinoma or nonsmall cell cancer. In male patients with genital Paget's, the risk of proximal genitourinary malignancy was 9.7%, scrotal or testicular adenocarcinoma was 0.4%, and penile or scrotal squamous carcinoma was 1.7%. In female patients with genital Paget's, the risk of proximal genitourinary malignancy was 3.0%, vaginal or vulvar adenocarcinoma was 1.4%, and vaginal or vulvar squamous neoplasm was 1.0%. Five-year overall survival was 59.7%, 73.5%, and 80.7% in patients with anal, male genital, and female genital Paget's (p < 0.001).

Limitations: The registry did not record surveillance schedule, provider specialty, or nonprocedural therapies for extramammary Paget's disease.

Conclusions: In the largest published cohort of patients with extramammary Paget's disease, patients with anal Paget's had a much higher risk of both proximal and local neoplasms as compared with patients with genital Paget's. Patients with anal Paget's also experienced worse survival as compared with those with purely genital Paget's. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/B20. ALTO RIESGO DE NEOPLASIAS PROXIMALES Y LOCALES EN 2206 PACIENTES CON ENFERMEDAD DE PAGET EXTRAMAMARIA ANOGENITAL:: La enfermedad de Paget extramamaria es un adenocarcinoma intraepidérmico poco frecuente con implicaciones clínicas poco definidas.Estimar el riesgo de segundas neoplasias primarias en pacientes con enfermedad de Paget extramamaria.Análisis retrospectivo del Registro de Vigilancia, Epidemiología y Resultados Finales (1973-2014).Registros de base poblacional en cáncer de los Estados Unidos.Pacientes que fueron diagnosticados con enfermedad de Paget anogenital.Riesgo de desarrollo un cáncer primario adicional.Se identificaron 108 pacientes con Paget anal, 421 pacientes con Paget genital masculino (escroto o pene) y 1677 pacientes con Paget genital femenino (vagina o vulva). Tiempo mediano de seguimiento fue de 5,9 años. El riesgo de desarrollar adenocarcinoma colorrectal fue del 18,5% para los pacientes con Paget anal. El ochenta por ciento de los diagnósticos de adenocarcinoma colorrectal fueron sincrónicos (dentro de los 2 meses) a los diagnósticos de Paget anal, mientras que los tumores metacrónicos ocurrieron en un tiempo promedio de 2,4 años. De los pacientes con Paget anal, el 8.3% desarrolló un adenocarcinoma anal o cáncer de células no pequeñas. En los pacientes masculinos con Paget genital, el riesgo de malignidad genitourinaria proximal fue del 9,7%, el adenocarcinoma escrotal o testicular fue del 0,4% y el carcinoma escamoso del pene o escroto fue del 1,7%. En pacientes femeninas con Paget genital, el riesgo de malignidad genitourinaria proximal fue de 3.0%, el adenocarcinoma vaginal o vulvar fue de 1.4% y la neoplasia escamosa vaginal o vulvar fue de 1.0%. La supervivencia general a cinco años fue del 59.7%, 73.5% y 80.7% en pacientes con anal, genital masculino y genital femenino, respectivamente (p <0.001).El registro no señalo el cronograma de vigilancia, la especialidad del proveedor o las terapias sin procedimiento para la enfermedad de Paget extramamaria.En la cohorte más grande publicada de pacientes con enfermedad de Paget extramamaria, los pacientes con Paget anal demostraron un riesgo mucho mayor de neoplasias proximales y locales en comparación con los pacientes con Paget genital. Los pacientes con Paget anal además demostraron una peor supervivencia en comparación con aquellos con Paget aislada genital. Vea el Resumen del Video en http://links.lww.com/DCR/B20.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001487DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6785398PMC
November 2019

Perineural Invasion Is a Prognostic but not a Predictive Factor in Nonmetastatic Colon Cancer.

Dis Colon Rectum 2019 10;62(10):1212-1221

Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: Perineural invasion is associated with adverse oncological outcomes in colorectal cancer. However, data regarding the prognostic and predictive impact in colon cancer are scarce.

Objective: This study aims to clarify the role of perineural invasion in patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer.

Design: This study is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database.

Settings: This study took place at a tertiary medical center.

Patients: Patients with stage I to III colon cancer who underwent elective surgery at our tertiary center between 2004 and 2015 (n = 1145) were included.

Mean Outcome Measures: The primary long-term outcomes include disease-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Differences were determined by multivariate Cox regression models adjusted for stage and potential confounders.

Results: Perineural invasion was identified in 215 patients (18.8%) and associated with emergency procedures, male sex, and advanced disease. Histopathological features including lymphatic and extramural vascular invasion, poor differentiation, and infiltrating tumor borders were correlated with perineural invasion. Compared with patients with perineural invasion-negative tumors, patients who had perineural invasion-positive tumors had worse disease-free, overall, and disease-specific survival (all p < 0.001). Moreover, patients with perineural invasion-positive node-negative disease had worse overall survival than patients with perineural invasion-negative node-positive disease (p < 0.001). After adjustment, perineural invasion remained significantly associated with worse disease-free survival (HR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.03-2.03; p = 0.033), worse overall survival (HR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.33-2.31; p < 0.001), and worse disease-specific survival (HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.00-2.30; p = 0.048). However, we did not find a significant predictive response with adjuvant chemotherapy in perineural invasion-positive node-negative tumors (HR, 2.10; 95% CI, 0.80-5.51; p = 0.122). The predictive value was only demonstrated in stage III disease with a significant impaired overall survival in patients with perineural invasion-positive tumors who did not receive adjuvant therapy (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.13-0.40; p < 0.001).

Limitations: This study was limited by its retrospective design.

Conclusion: Our study confirms the prognostic value of perineural invasion in stage I to II and III colon cancer. However, patients with node-negative disease and perineural invasion did not significantly benefit from adjuvant therapy. More information regarding postoperative treatment in node-negative perineural invasion-positive colon cancer is required. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A988. LA INVASIÓN PERINEURAL COMO FACTOR PRONÓSTICO NO PREDICTIVO EN EL CÁNCER DE COLON NO METASTÁSICO: La invasión perineural se encuentra asociada a resultados oncológicos adversos en casos de cáncer colorrectal. Sin embargo, los datos sobre el impacto pronóstico y predictivo en caso de cáncer de colon son pocos.

Objetivo: Definir el papel de la invasión perineural en pacientes con cáncer de colon no metastásico. DISEÑO:: Revisión retrospectiva de una base de datos alimentada prospectivamente.

Ajustes: Centro hospitalario de atención terciaria.

Pacientes: Todos aquellos portadores de un cáncer de colon estadío I-III que se sometieron a cirugía electiva en nuestro centro entre 2004-2015 (n = 1145).

Principales Resultados: Los resultados a largo plazo incluyeron la supervivencia sin enfermedad, la supervivencia específica de la enfermedad y la supervivencia general. Las diferencias se determinaron mediante modelos de regresión multivariantes de Cox, ajustados para el control de factores de confusión durante el análisis por estratificación.

Resultados: La invasión perineural fué identificada en 215 pacientes (18.8%) y se la asoció con procedimientos de emergencia, al género masculino y a la enfermedad avanzada. Las características histopatológicas que incluyeron la invasión vascular linfática y extramural, la diferenciación deficiente y los bordes tumorales infiltrantes se correlacionaron con la invasión perineural. Comparativamente con los tumores sin invasión perineural, los pacientes positivos a la invasión perineural tuvieron una peor supervivencia general, libre y específica de la enfermedad (todos p < 0.001). Asimismo, aquellos pacientes con invasion-perineural con ganglios negativos tuvieron una supervivencia global mucho peor que aquellos pacientes con ganglios positivos e invasión perineural negativa (p < 0.001). Después del ajuste, la invasión perineural se asoció significativamente con una peor supervivencia sin la enfermedad (HR, 1.45; IC 95%, 1.03-2.03; p = 0.033), supervivencia general (HR, 1.75; IC 95%, 1.33-2.31; p <0.001), así como con una peor supervivencia específica de la enfermedad (HR, 1.52; IC 95%, 1.00-2.30; p = 0.048). Sin embargo, no encontramos una respuesta predictiva significativa con quimioterapia adyuvante en los tumores acompañados de invasion-perineural con ganglios negativos (HR, 2.10; IC del 95%, 0.80-5.51; p = 0.122). El valor predictivo solo fué demostrado en aquellos casos de estadio III con un deterioro significativo de la supervivencia global en pacientes con tumores perineurales positivos a la invasión y que no recibieron tratamiento adyuvante (HR, 0.23; IC 95%, 0.13-0.40; p < 0.001).

Limitaciones: Diseño retrospectivo. CONCLUSIÓN:: Nuestros resultados confirman el valor pronóstico de la invasión perineural en el cáncer de colon estadios I-II y III. Sin embargo, los pacientes con enfermedad ganglionar negativa e invasión perineural no se beneficiaron significativamente de la terapia adyuvante. Se requiere más información sobre el tratamiento postoperatorio en el cáncer de colon positivo para la invasión perineural con ganglios negativos. Vea el Resumen del video en http://links.lww.com/DCR/A988.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001450DOI Listing
October 2019

Clinical impact of PET/MR in treated colorectal cancer patients.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2019 Oct 29;46(11):2260-2269. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, White 270, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.

Purpose: The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PET/MR induced management changes versus standard of care imaging (SCI) in treated colorectal cancer patients. The secondary aim was to assess the staging performance of PET/MR and of SCI versus the final oncologic stage.

Methods: Treated CRC patients who underwent PET/MR with F-FDG and SCI between January 2016 and October 2018 were enrolled in this retrospective study. Their medical records were evaluated to ascertain if PET/MR had impacted on their clinical management versus SCI. The final oncologic stage, as reported in the electronic medical record, was considered the true stage of disease.

Results: A total of 39 patients who underwent 42 PET/MR studies were included, mean age 56.7 years (range 39-75 years), 26 males, and 13 females. PET/MR changed clinical management 15/42 times (35.7%, standard error ± 7.4%); these 15 changes in management were due to upstaging in 9/42 (21.5%) and downstaging in 6/42 (14.2%). The differences in management prompted by SCI versus PET/MR were statistically significant, and PET/MR outperformed SCI (P value < 0.001; odds ratio = 2.8). In relation to the secondary outcome, PET/MR outperformed the SCI in accuracy of oncologic staging (P value = 0.016; odds ratio = 4.6).

Conclusions: PET/MR is a promising imaging tool in the evaluation of treated CRC and might change the management in these patients. However, multicenter prospective studies with larger patient samples are required in order to confirm these preliminary results.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00259-019-04449-7DOI Listing
October 2019

Predictors of Prolonged Opioid Use Following Colectomy.

Dis Colon Rectum 2019 09;62(9):1117-1123

Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: The United States is in the middle of an opioid epidemic. Gastrointestinal surgery has been ranked in the top 3 surgical subspecialties for highest opioid prescribing.

Objective: The goal of this study is to determine the rate of and risk factors for prolonged opioid use following colectomy.

Design: This study utilized data (2015-2017) from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from 5 institutions.

Settings: This study was conducted at 2 academic and 3 community hospitals.

Patients: Included were 1243 patients who underwent colectomy.

Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome was rate of prolonged opioid use defined as a new opioid prescription 90 to 180 days postoperatively.

Results: A total of 132 (10.6%) patients were prolonged opioid users. In univariate analysis, patients who were prolonged opioid users were significantly more likely to have had more than one opioid prescription in the prior year, to have a higher ASA classification, to undergo an open procedure, to have an ostomy created, and to be discharged with a high quantity of opioids (all p < 0.05). Prolonged opioid users were significantly more likely to have a complication (p = 0.007) or readmission (p = 0.003) within 30 days of the index procedure. In multivariable analysis, prior opioid use (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.6-4.2; p < 0.001), ostomy creation (OR, 2.1; 95% CI,1.2-3.7; p = 0.01), higher quantity of opioid prescription at discharge (OR, 1.9; 95% CI,1.1-3.3; p = 0.03), higher ASA classification (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.1-2.6; p = 0.02), and hospital readmission (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2-3.4; p = 0.01) were independent predictors of prolonged opioid use.

Limitations: This study is a retrospective review, and all variables related to prolonged opioid use are not collected in the data.

Conclusions: A significant proportion of patients undergoing colectomy become prolonged opioid users. We have identified risk factors for prolonged postoperative opioid use, which may allow for improved patient education and targets for intervention preoperatively, as well as implementation of programs for monitoring and cessation of opioid use in the postoperative period. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A973. PREDICTORES DEL USO PROLONGADO DE OPIOIDES DESPUÉS DE LA COLECTOMÍA: Los Estados Unidos se encuentran en medio de una epidemia de opioides. La cirugía gastrointestinal ha sido clasificada entre las tres subespecialidades quirúrgicas principales para la prescripción más alta de opioides.

Objetivo: El objetivo de este estudio es determinar la tasa y los factores de riesgo para el uso prolongado de opioides después de la colectomía. DISEÑO:: Este estudio utilizó datos (2015-2017) del Programa Nacional de Mejoramiento de la Calidad Quirúrgica del Colegio Americano de Cirujanos de cinco instituciones.

Marco: Dos hospitales académicos y tres comunitarios.

Pacientes: 1,243 pacientes sometidos a una colectomía.

Medidas De Resultado Principales: El resultado primario fue la tasa de uso prolongado de opioides, definida como una nueva receta de opioides entre 90 y 180 días después de la operación.

Resultados: Un total de 132 (10.6%) pacientes fueron usuarios de opioides por tiempo prolongado. En el análisis univariado, los pacientes que eran usuarios prolongados de opioides tenían una probabilidad significativamente mayor de haber tenido más de una receta de opioides en el año anterior, tenían una clasificación más alta de la Asociación Americana de Anestesiólogos, se sometieron a un procedimiento abierto, se les creó una ostomía y se les dio de alta con una cantidad grande de opioides (todos p < 0.05). Los usuarios de opioides prolongados fueron significativamente más propensos a tener una complicación (p = 0.007) o readmisión (p = 0.003) dentro de los 30 días del procedimiento índice. En el análisis multivariado, el uso previo de opioides (OR, 2.6; IC 95%, 1.6-4.2; p < 0.001), creación de ostomía (OR, 2.1; IC 95%, 1.2-3.7; p = 0.01), mayor cantidad de prescripción de opioides al dar de alta (OR, 1.9; IC 95%, 1.1-3.3; p = 0.03), clasificación más alta de la Asociación Americana de Anestesiólogos (OR, 1.7; IC 95%, 1.1-2.6; p = 0.02) y reingreso hospitalario (OR, 2.0; IC del 95%, 1.2-3.4, p = 0.01) fueron predictores independientes del uso prolongado de opioides.

Limitaciones: Este estudio es una revisión retrospectiva y todos los variables relacionadas con el uso prolongado de opioides no se colectaron en los datos.

Conclusiones: Una proporción significativa de pacientes con colectomía se convierten en usuarios prolongados de opioides. Hemos identificado factores de riesgo para el uso prolongado de opioides postoperatorios, que pueden permitir una mejor educación del paciente y objetivos para la intervención preoperatoria, así como la implementación de programas para la supervisión y cese del uso de opioides en el período postoperatorio. Vea el Video de Resumen en http://links.lww.com/DCR/A973.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001429DOI Listing
September 2019

The Authors Reply.

Dis Colon Rectum 2019 06;62(6):e34-e35

Colorectal Surgery Center, Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DCR.0000000000001381DOI Listing
June 2019

Detrimental impact of symptom-detected colorectal cancer.

Surg Endosc 2020 02 24;34(2):569-579. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Division of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: The incidence and mortality rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been steadily decreasing, largely attributable to screening colonoscopies that either remove precancerous lesions or identify CRC earlier. We aimed to assess the prognostic difference between colorectal cancers diagnosed by screening (SC), diagnostic (DC), or surveillance (SU) colonoscopies.

Methods: All 1809 surgically treated patients with primary CRC diagnosed through colonoscopy at our tertiary center (2004-2015) were extracted from a prospectively maintained database. Oncologic outcomes were compared, including multivariate Cox regression.

Results: Diagnostic patients presented with more advanced disease (15.0% vs. 53.2% (SC) and 55.3% (SU) AJCC I, P < 0.001), subsequently leading to impaired survival and higher recurrence rates (P < 0.001). After adjustment for age, ASA-score and gender, oncologic outcomes remained significantly worse after DC. Hazard ratios (HR) of overall mortality (OS) compared to DC were 0.36 for SC and 0.58 for SU (P < 0.001). Adjusted HRs of disease-free survival (DFS) were 0.43 and 0.32, respectively (P < 0.001). Worse outcomes in OS withstood adjustment for stage, tumor site and (neo)adjuvant treatment (SC: HR 0.46, P < 0.001; SU: HR 0.73, P = 0.036). The benefits of SC were particularly seen in colon cancer, stages I-II and female patients. With regard to DFS, outcomes were less profound and mainly true in early stage disease and surveillance patients.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates the enormous impact of asymptomatic screening in CRC. Patients with CRC diagnosed through screening or surveillance had a significantly better prognosis compared to patients who presented symptomatically. This emphasizes the importance of screening.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00464-019-06798-8DOI Listing
February 2020

Concordance Between Registry and Administrative Data in the Determination of Comorbidity: A Multi-institutional Study.

Ann Surg 2020 12;272(6):1006-1011

Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona.

Objective: To characterize agreement between administrative and registry data in the determination of patient-level comorbidities.

Background: Previous research finds poor agreement between these 2 types of data in the determination of outcomes. We hypothesized that concordance between administrative and registry data would also be poor.

Methods: A cohort of inpatient operations (length of stay 1 day or greater) was obtained from a consortium of 8 hospitals. Within each hospital, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data were merged with intra-institutional inpatient administrative data. Twelve different comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, hemodialysis-dependence, cancer diagnosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ascites, sepsis, smoking, steroid, congestive heart failure, acute renal failure, and dyspnea) were analyzed in terms of agreement between administrative and NSQIP data.

Results: Forty-one thousand four hundred thirty-two inpatient surgical hospitalizations were analyzed in this study. Concordance (Cohen Kappa value) between the 2 data sources varied from 0.79 (diabetes) to 0.02 (dyspnea). Hospital variation in concordance (intersite variation) was quantified using a test of homogeneity. This test found significant intersite variation at a level of P < 0.001 for each of the comorbidities except for dialysis (P = 0.07) and acute renal failure (P = 0.19). These findings imply significant differences between hospitals in their generation of comorbidity data.

Conclusion: This study finds significant differences in how administrative versus registry data assess patient-level comorbidity. These differences are of concern to patients, payers, and providers, each of which had a stake in the integrity of these data. Standardized definitions of comorbidity and periodic audits are necessary to ensure data accuracy and minimize bias.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000003247DOI Listing
December 2020

Colorectal Surgical Site Infection Prevention Kits Prior to Elective Colectomy Improve Outcomes.

Ann Surg 2020 06;271(6):1110-1115

Colorectal Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA.

Introduction: Patient compliance with preoperative mechanical and antibiotic bowel preparation, skin washes, carbohydrate loading, and avoidance of fasting are key components of successful colorectal ERAS and surgical site infection (SSI)-reduction programs. In July 2016, we began a quality improvement project distributing a free SSI Prevention Kit (SSIPK) containing patient instructions, mechanical and oral bowel preparation, chlorhexidine washes, and carbohydrate drink to all patients scheduled for elective colectomy, with the goal of improving patient compliance and rates of SSI.

Methods: This was a prospective data audit of our first 221 SSIPK+ patients, who were compared to historical controls (SSIPK-) of 1760 patients undergoing elective colectomy from January 2013 to March 2017. A 1:1 propensity score system accounted for nonrandom treatment assignment. Matched patients' complications, particularly postoperative infection and ileus, were compared.

Results: SSIPK+ (n = 219) and SSIPK- (n = 219) matched patients were statistically identical on demographics, comorbidities, BMI, surgical indication, and procedure. SSIPK+ patients had higher compliance with mechanical (95% vs 71%, P < 0.001) and oral antibiotic (94% vs 27%, P < 0.001) bowel preparation. This translated into lower overall SSI rates (5.9% vs 11.4%, P = 0.04). SSIPK+ patients also had lower rates of anastomotic leak (2.7% vs 6.8%, P = 0.04), prolonged postoperative ileus (5.9% vs 14.2%, P < 0.01), and unplanned intubation (0% vs 2.3%, P = 0.02). Furthermore, SSIPK+ patients had shorter mean hospital length of stay (3.1 vs 5.4 d, P < 0.01) and had fewer unplanned readmissions (5.9% vs 14.6%, P < 0.001). There were no differences in rates of postoperative pneumonia, urinary tract infection, Clostridium difficile colitis, sepsis, or death.

Conclusion: Provision of a free-of-charge SSIPK is associated with higher patient compliance with preoperative instructions and significantly lower rates of surgical site infections, lower rates of prolonged postoperative ileus, and shorter hospital stays with fewer readmissions. Widespread utilization of such a bundle could therefore lead to significantly improved outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000003194DOI Listing
June 2020

Impact of intramural and extramural vascular invasion on stage II-III colon cancer outcomes.

J Surg Oncol 2019 May 15;119(6):749-757. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background And Objectives: Vascular invasion, in particular extramural venous invasion (EMVI), is a pathologic characteristic that has been extensively studied in rectal cancer but rarely in colon cancer. This study aims to evaluate its prognostic role in stage II-III colon cancer.

Methods: All stage II-III colon cancer patients who underwent surgery between 2004 and 2015 were reviewed. We compared patients without invasion, with intramural invasion only (IMVI), EMVI only, and both IMVI/EMVI (n = 923).

Results: EMVI was associated with other high-risk features, including T4, N+ disease, lymphatic, and perineural invasion (P < 0.001). EMVI+ patients had higher rates of locoregional and distant recurrence and subsequently disease-specific mortality (stage-II, odds ratio [OR] 3.64; P = 0.001; stage-III OR, 1.94; P = 0.009), whereas outcomes were comparable between IMVI and no vascular invasion (OR, 1.21; P = 0.764; OR, 1.28, P = 0.607, respectively). The adjusted HRs for EMVI+ patients on disease-free survival, and disease-specific survival were 2.07 ( P < 0.001) and 1.67 ( P = 0.027), respectively. Moreover, EMVI+ stage-II patients fared worse than EMVI- stage-III patients, even after adjusting for adjuvant chemotherapy.

Conclusion: EMVI is a strong predictor for worse oncologic outcomes in stage II-III colon cancer patients, whereas IMVI is not. It is also associated with worse outcomes compared in patients with higher stage disease who are EMVI negative.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.25367DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6629581PMC
May 2019

Comparable perioperative outcomes, long-term outcomes, and quality of life in a retrospective analysis of ulcerative colitis patients following 2-stage versus 3-stage proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis.

Int J Colorectal Dis 2019 Mar 4;34(3):491-499. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Division of General and Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, GRB-425, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.

Purpose: Many surgeons assume 3-stage ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) is safer than 2-stage IPAA in patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC), although recent data suggest outcomes are comparable. This study aimed to compare perioperative complications, late complications, and functional outcomes after 2- versus 3-stage IPAA in patients with active UC.

Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of patients who underwent 2- or 3-stage IPAA for active UC from 2000 to 2015 in a high-volume institution. Patients completed quality-of-life surveys 6 months following ileostomy reversal. Perioperative and late complications were recorded. Outcomes were compared with the Fisher exact test, and multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders.

Results: We identified 212 patients who underwent 2- or 3-stage IPAA for active UC, of whom 157 patients (74.1%) underwent 2-stage procedures and 55 (25.9%) underwent 3-stage procedures. More patients undergoing 2-stage procedures were taking immunomodulators preoperatively (46.3% vs. 23.1%, p = 0.01), but there was no difference in use of steroids (p = 0.09) or biologic agents (p = 0.85). Three-stage procedures were more likely to be urgent (78.6% vs. 30.2%, p < 0.001). There were no differences in perioperative complications (p = 0.50), anastomotic leak (p = 0.94), pouchitis (p = 0.45), pouch failure (p = 0.46), perceived quality of life (p = 0.68), number of bowel movements per day (p = 0.27), or sexual satisfaction (p = 0.21) between the 2- and 3-stage groups.

Conclusions: Patients undergoing 2-stage compared to 3-stage IPAA for active ulcerative colitis have comparable outcomes and quality of life following ileostomy reversal. Two-stage IPAA appears to be safe and appropriate, even in high-risk patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00384-018-03221-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6450759PMC
March 2019
-->