Publications by authors named "Lidiane Vasconcelos do Nascimento Carvalho"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Investigation of a new oxazolidine derivative in human resistance acute leukemia cells: deciphering its mechanism of action by label-free proteomic.

Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol 2021 06 21;394(6):1153-1166. Epub 2021 Jan 21.

Research Center for Therapeutic Innovation (NUPIT-SG), Federal University of Pernambuco, Professor Moraes Rêgo s/n, Cidade Universitária, Recife, Pernambuco, 50670-901, Brazil.

The present study aimed to evaluate the mechanism of action of the antineoplastic activity of an oxazolidine derivative, LPSF/NB-3 (5-(4-cloro-benzilideno)-3-etil-2-tioxo-oxazolidin-4-ona). Cytotoxicity assays were performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and resistant acute leukemia cell line (HL-60/MX1) by the MTT method. LPSF/NB-3 exhibited cytotoxicity in HL-60/MX1, but it was not toxic to healthy cells in the highest dose tested (100 μM). The protein extract of HL-60/MX1 cells treated with LPSF/NB-3 was subjected to proteomic analysis using two-dimensional chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. We could identify a total of 2652 proteins, in which 633 were statistically modulated. Within the group of protein considered for the quantitative analysis with the established criteria, 262 were differentially expressed, 146 with increased expression and 116 with decreased expression in the sample treated with LPSF/NB-3 compared to the control. The following differentially expressed pathways were found: involving regulation of the cytoskeleton, DNA damage, and transduce cellular signals. Networks that were highlighted are related to the immune system. The ELISA technique was used to assess the immunomodulatory potential of LPSF/NB-3 in PBMCs. We observed significant decrease of IFNγ (p < 0.01) and dose-response pattern of the cytokines IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22, and IL-10. Therefore, results suggest that LPSF/NB-3 appears to modulate important pathways, including cell cycle and immune system regulatory pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00210-020-02024-8DOI Listing
June 2021

Evaluation of IL-33 and IL-34 Plasma Levels in a Cohort of Multiple Myeloma Patients in Northeast Brazil.

J Interferon Cytokine Res 2020 11;40(11):540-541

Research Center for Therapeutic Innovation (NUPIT-SG), Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jir.2020.0100DOI Listing
November 2020

Portulaca elatior root contains a trehalose-binding lectin with antibacterial and antifungal activities.

Int J Biol Macromol 2019 Apr 22;126:291-297. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Departamento de Bioquímica, Centro de Biociências, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Electronic address:

Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins broadly distributed in plants and have several biological functions, including antimicrobial action. Portulaca elatior is a Caatinga plant whose chemical composition and biotechnological potential have not been extensively studied. In this work, a lectin was isolated from P. elatior root extract and evaluated for antimicrobial activity. The P. elatior root lectin (PeRoL) showed native molecular mass of 33 kDa, pI 3.8 and is comprised of two subunits of 15 kDa linked by disulfide bonds. No sequence similarities with Viridiplantae proteins were observed. The PeRoL hemagglutinating activity (HA) was not affected by heating and was detected in a pH ranging from 4.0 to 8.0. Trehalose was identified as an endogenous inhibitor of PeRoL present in the roots. Bacteriostatic activity was detected against Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus (minimal inhibitory concentration of 8.1, 32.5 and 4.06 μg/mL, respectively). PeRoL induced the death of Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, and Candida tropicalis cells, with a minimal fungicidal concentration of 16 μg/mL. The lectin (100 μg/mL) was not cytotoxic to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and did not show hemolytic activity. In conclusion, the roots of P. elatior contain a trehalose-binding, thermostable, and antimicrobial lectin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2018.12.188DOI Listing
April 2019

CasuL: A new lectin isolated from Calliandra surinamensis leaf pinnulae with cytotoxicity to cancer cells, antimicrobial activity and antibiofilm effect.

Int J Biol Macromol 2017 May 5;98:419-429. Epub 2017 Feb 5.

Departamento de Bioquímica, Centro de Biociências, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-420 Recife, Brazil. Electronic address:

This work describes the isolation of a lectin (CasuL) from the leaf pinnulae of Calliandra surinamensis and the evaluation of its cytotoxic, antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties. Proteins from pinnulae extract were precipitated with ammonium sulphate (60% saturation) and submitted to Sephadex G-75 chromatography, which yielded isolated CasuL (purification factor: 113). Native CasuL is an acidic protein (pI 5.82) with a relative molecular mass of 48kDa. This lectin is also an oligomeric protein composed of three subunits and mass spectrometry revealed similarities with a Sorghum bicolor protein. CasuL did not undergo unfolding when heated but changes in conformation and hemagglutinating activity were detected at basic pH. CasuL did not reduce the viability of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells but was toxic to leukemic K562 cells (IC 67.04±5.78μg/mL) and breast cancer T47D cells (IC: 58.75±2.5μg/mL). CasuL (6.25-800μg/mL) only showed bacteriostatic effect but was able to reduce biofilm formation by Staphylococcus saprophyticcus and Staphylococcus aureus (non-resistant and oxacillin-resistant isolates). CasuL showed antifungal activity against Candida krusei causing alterations in cell morphology and damage to cell wall. In conclusion, the pinnulae of C. surinamensis leaves contain a thermo-stable lectin with biotechnological potential as cytotoxic, antibiofilm, and antifungal agent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2017.02.019DOI Listing
May 2017

Evaluation of Antibacterial, Antineoplastic, and Immunomodulatory Activity of Seeds Crude Extract and Ethyl-Acetate Fraction.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2016 7;2016:1203274. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

Laboratory of Immunomodulation and New Therapeutical Approaches, Research Centre for Therapeutic Innovation Suely Galdino (NUPIT-SG), Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, PE, Brazil.

(Guarana) is a native plant of Amazon region that has very traditional importance. Its seeds are rich in bioactive compounds, including tannins, which exhibit relevant properties. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial, antineoplastic, and immunomodulatory activity of seeds crude extract (CE) and ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF). Antibacterial activity was evaluated by determination of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). Antineoplastic activity was evaluated by MTT assays in hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), ductal carcinoma (T47-D), non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma (Toledo), T cell leukemia (Jukart), and Acute Leukemia (HL-60) cell lines. BALB/c mice splenocytes were treated to assess IFN-, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-10 levels by sandwich ELISA. CE and EAF were not toxic to peripheral blood cells and splenocytes. CE and EAF fractions showed a bacteriostatic activity (MIC = 250 g/mL) and presented IC values of 70.25 g/mL and 61.18 g/mL in HL-60 leukemia cell line. All cytokines evaluated had their levels reduced after treatment, following dose-response model. Different biological activities were observed for both CE and EAF, suggesting as a source of bioactive substances, especially tannins that may be used for several diseases treatments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1203274DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5174172PMC
December 2016
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