Publications by authors named "Liang-Ying He"

32 Publications

Variations of antibiotic resistome in swine wastewater during full-scale anaerobic digestion treatment.

Environ Int 2021 Oct 12;155:106694. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Anaerobic digesters have been widely used to treat wastewaters in livestock farms. With the increasing risk of antibiotic resistance originated from livestock husbandry, removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) via anaerobic digesters deserved more attention. Here we investigated the removal of antibiotics and ARGs in swine wastewater by three on-farm full-scale anaerobic digesters, including buried biogas digester (BBD), up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and high density polyethylene covered biogas digester (HDPE-BD). Variations of antibiotic resistome in swine wastewater were further revealed by metagenomic sequencing. Results showed the removal efficiencies for antibiotics, ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) varied in the three digesters, ranging from 65.1% to 98.1%, 3.5%-71.0% and 26.9%-77.2%, respectively. In general, UASB and HDPE-BD showed better removal efficiencies than BBD. However, enrichment of metal resistance genes (MRGs) was noted in UASB. Pathogens could not be effectively removed by all of the three digesters. What's more, accumulation of pathogens was found in UASB (removal efficiencies: -8.5%-13.6%). Bacterial community succession, horizontal genetic transfer and biocide and metal resistance genes (BMRGs) profiles jointly structured the variation of antibiotic resistome during anaerobic digestion. A total of 334 high-quality bins were identified from swine wastewater, 96 of which belonged to phylum of Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria carried ARGs. Proteobacteria was the dominant multi-drug resistant flora. Meanwhile, ARG-carrying pathogens (Bacteroides and Mycolicibacter) were found in the swine wastewater, suggesting a potential threat to human and animal health. The findings from this study showed that HDPE-BD is the most eco-friendly and effective anaerobic digester in controlling risks from antibiotic resistance determinants in swine wastewater.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2021.106694DOI Listing
October 2021

Dissipation of antibiotic resistance genes in manure-amended agricultural soil.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Sep 13;787:147582. Epub 2021 May 13.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Theoretical Chemistry, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Soil antibiotic resistance due to animal manure application is of great concern in recent years. Little is known about the fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in agricultural soils associated with long-term manure application. Here we used soil microcosms to investigate the dissipation of ARGs and the change of bacterial community in agricultural soil originated from a vegetable field which had received 24 years' swine manure application. Soil microcosms were conducted at different soil moistures and with or without biochar over a testing period of two years in lab. Results showed that continuous manure application induced an accumulation of ARGs in soil, wherein the dissipation of ARGs differed from those in non-manure amended soil. ARGs persisted in soils at least two years, although their abundance declined gradually. Meanwhile, soil moisture and biochar had significant impact on the fate of ARGs. ARGs dissipated faster in soil with higher moisture. Biochar amendment contributed to the maintenance of bacterial diversity. Within the two years of simulation experiment, biochar enhanced soil ARG retention as they dissipated slowly in the soil amended with biochar. Succession of microbial community may have sustained the transfer and resilience of ARGs. This study provides insight into the dissipation of antibiotic resistance genes in manure-applied agricultural soil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.147582DOI Listing
September 2021

Microalgae-based technology for antibiotics removal: From mechanisms to application of innovational hybrid systems.

Environ Int 2021 Oct 30;155:106594. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Antibiotics contamination is an emerging environmental concern, owing to its potential risks to ecosystems and human health. Microalgae-based technology has been widely reported as a promising alternative to conventional wastewater treatment, since it is a solar-power driven, ecologically friendly, cost-effective, and sustainable reclamation strategy. This review provides fundamental insights into the major mechanisms underpinning microalgae-based antibiotics removal, including bioadsorption, bioaccumulation, and biodegradation. The critical role of extracellular polymeric substances on bioadsorption and extracellular biodegradation of antibiotics are also covered. Moreover, this review sheds light on the important factors affecting the removal of antibiotics by microalgae, and summarizes several novel approaches to improve the removal efficiency, including acclimation, co-metabolism and microbial consortium. Besides, hybrid systems (such as, microalgae-based technologies combined with the conventional activated sludge, advanced oxidation processes, constructed wetlands, and microbial fuel cells), and genetic engineering are also recommended, which will be feasible for enhanced removal of antibiotics. Finally, this review also highlights the need for further studies aimed at optimizing microalgae-based technology, with emphasis on improving performance and expanding its application in large-scale settings, especially in terms of technical, environmental-friendly and economically competitiveness. Overall, this review summarizes current understanding on microalgae-based technologies for removal of antibiotics and outlines future research directions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2021.106594DOI Listing
October 2021

Antibiotic resistance genes in surface water and groundwater from mining affected environments.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Jun 2;772:145516. Epub 2021 Feb 2.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Theoretical Chemistry, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Mining activities are known to generate a large amount of mine tailings and acid mine drainage which contain varieties of heavy metals. Heavy metals play an important role in co-selection for bacterial antibiotic resistance. However, the characteristics of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in mining-affected water environments are still unclear. Here we investigated the pollution of metals, profiles of ARGs, mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and microbial community in mining-affected surface water and groundwater. The results showed that in the tested water samples, the concentrations of Zn and Mn were the highest, and Ni was the lowest. Higher abundances of ARGs with great proportion of sulfonamides, chloramphenicols and tetracyclines resistance genes were found in mining-affected water when compared with those without mining activities. Additionally, there were positive correlations between heavy metals (especially Ni, Zn and Mn) and these ARGs. Linear regression analysis suggested that MGEs were positively correlated with ARGs. In addition, total phosphorus was correlated with ARGs (p < 0.05). The microbial community was different between the mining-affected water and the reference (p < 0.05). Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were dominant phyla in the surface water and groundwater. Network analysis showed that many ARGs were significantly associated with these dominant bacteria, which suggested they might be potential hosts for these ARGs. These findings provide a clear evidence that the mining activities in the study area had a significant impact on surface water and groundwater to different degrees.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.145516DOI Listing
June 2021

Distribution and mass loads of xenoestrogens bisphenol a, 4-nonylphenol, and 4-tert-octylphenol in rainfall runoff from highly urbanized regions: A comparison with point sources of wastewater.

J Hazard Mater 2021 01 22;401:123747. Epub 2020 Aug 22.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

This study pays a special attention to three phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), - bisphenol A (BPA), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), and 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP) - that are present in urban environments, resultant of several anthropogenic activities that can be also carried through rainfall runoff. We investigated the distributions of BPA, 4-NP, and 4-t-OP in Pearl River basin and estimated the mass loads in rainfall runoff, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, and industrial wastewater from urbanized Huizhou and Dongguan regions. These three phenolic EDCs were detected frequently in tributaries and mainstream of Dongjiang River with the maximum 4-NP concentrations of 14,540 ng/L in surface waters and 3088 ng/g in sediments. BPA showed high concentrations in rainfall runoff samples with maximum concentrations of 5873 and 2397 ng/L in Huizhou and Dongguan regions, respectively, while concentrations for 4-NP and 4-t-OP were detected at tens to hundreds of nanograms per liter. Mass loads of phenolic EDCs from rainfall runoff were 3-62 times higher than those of WWTP effluents, suggesting rainfall runoff is an important source of phenolic EDCs into receiving waters. Sources and tributaries showed median to high estrogenic risks, while low to median risks were found in mainstream, implying the source control should be focused.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2020.123747DOI Listing
January 2021

Untreated swine wastes changed antibiotic resistance and microbial community in the soils and impacted abundances of antibiotic resistance genes in the vegetables.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Nov 23;741:140482. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Animal waste fertilization is a traditional agricultural practice, which may have adverse effects to soil ecosystem. However, the side-effects of animal waste fertilization on vegetables are less studied. Here we selected a swine farming village for investigation with a nearby village without swine farming as comparison. In the swine farming village, the farmers use untreated swine manure and wastewater as fertilizers for vegetable cultivation. In the reference village, the farmers mainly use commercial organic fertilizers. The objective of this study is to assess the impacts of untreated swine waste fertilization on both soils and vegetables in terms of antibiotics, antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and bacterial microbial communities. The results indicate that untreated swine waste fertilization caused both antibiotic and ARG contaminations and changed the microbial community compositions in the soils. Varieties of tetracyclines and related resistance genes were detected especially in swine wastewater treated soils. The soil quality was impacted with the relations to bacterial abundances and microbial geochemical functions. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were prevalent and positively correlated to ARGs in soils, indicating they were potential antibiotic resistant bacteria. Antibiotics and ARGs were detected in vegetables of both villages. The abundances of ARGs were relatively higher in some vegetable samples of the swine farming village than the reference village. In addition, intracellular parasites Rickettsiales with positive correlation to ARGs were prevalent in some vegetables of swine farming village, indicating potential health risks through eating contaminated vegetables. The results of this study suggest that untreated swine wastes may cause adverse effects to not only agricultural soils but also associated vegetables.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.140482DOI Listing
November 2020

[Profiles and Risk of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Domestic Wells in the Maozhou River Basin].

Huan Jing Ke Xue 2020 Jul;41(7):3222-3230

Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

Intensive use of antibiotics promotes the occurrence and development of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) enter water environments from human and animal sources. Groundwater serves as an important water supply, while the profiles and risk of ARGs in groundwater remain unknown. The abundance and profiles of ARGs in 11 domestic wells in the Maozhou River basin of Shenzhen City were analyzed by high-throughput qPCR. The results showed that a total of 141 ARGs and 8 mobile genetic elements (MGEs) were detected, of which the genes corresponding resistance to sulfonamides, multidrugs, and aminoglycosides were the most abundant. In each well, the number of detected ARGs and MGEs ranged from 48 to 89, with an average of 68. When normalized by the abundance of 16S rRNA genes, it was found that each bacterium carried at least one ARG in the groundwater of W7, W8, and W10, while in W11, each bacterium carried at least four ARGs. Clinically relevant ARGs that code for resistance to glycopeptide (, , , and ), -lactams ( and ), or chloramphenicol () were found in groundwater. In addition, the abundance of sulfonamides, multidrugs, aminoglycosides, -lactam, and chloramphenicol resistance genes were positively correlated with the abundance of MGEs (<0.01), suggesting that MGEs may promote the spread of ARGs in groundwater.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.13227/j.hjkx.201911256DOI Listing
July 2020

Uptake mechanism, subcellular distribution, and uptake process of perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid by wetland plant Alisma orientale.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Sep 13;733:139383. Epub 2020 May 13.

The Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are of particular environmental concern due to their environmental persistence and potential toxicity. Phytoremediation may be used to remove PFASs from wastewater. Here we investigated the uptake mechanism, subcellular distribution, and uptake process of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate acid (PFOS) in the wetland plant Alisma orientale by using a series of hydroponic experiments. Active uptake facilitated by water transporters and anion channels was involved in the uptake of PFASs by plant roots. PFOA and PFOS were mainly distributed in the water-soluble fraction (46.2-70.8%) and in cell walls (45.6-58.4%), respectively. The uptake process was proposed as follows: PFOS and PFOA were first distributed in the soluble fraction; a proportion of PFOS and PFOA were adsorbed gradually by the cell wall, and a proportion of PFOS and PFOA in the cell wall passed through the cell wall and plasmalemma and bind with organelles. PFOS and PFOA were transported from the external solution to the vascular bundle of the plant root through both symplastic and apoplastic routes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.139383DOI Listing
September 2020

Co-metabolism of sulfamethoxazole by a freshwater microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

Water Res 2020 May 28;175:115656. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou, 510006, China. Electronic address:

Microalgae-mediated biodegradation of antibiotics has recently gained increased attention from international scientific community. However, limited information is available regarding microalgae-mediated biodegradation of SMX in a co-metabolic system. Here we investigated the biodegradation of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) by five algal species (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, Scenedesmus quadricauda, Scenedesmus obliquus, Scenedesmus acuminatus and Chlorella pyrenoidosa), and its transformation pathways by C. pyrenoidosa in a sodium acetate (3 mM) co-metabolic system. The results showed that the highest SMX dissipation (14.9%) was detected by C. pyrenoidosa after 11 days of cultivation among the five tested algal species in the absence of other carbon sources. The addition of sodium acetate (0-8 mM) significantly enhanced the dissipation efficiency of SMX (0.4 μM) from 6.05% to 99.3% by C. pyrenoidosa after 5 days of cultivation, and the dissipation of SMX followed the first-order kinetic model with apparent rate constants (k) ranging from 0.0107 to 0.9811 d. Based on the results of mass balance analysis, biodegradation by C. pyrenoidosa was the main mechanism for the dissipation of SMX in the culture medium. Fifteen phase I and phase II metabolites were identified, and subsequently the transformation pathway was proposed, including oxidation, hydroxylation, formylation and side chain breakdown, as well as pterin-related conjugation. The majority of metabolites of SMX were only observed in the culture medium and varied with cultivation time. The findings of the present study showed effective co-metabolism of a sulfonamide by microalgae, and it may be applied in the aquatic environment remediation and wastewater treatment in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2020.115656DOI Listing
May 2020

Contamination profile of antibiotic resistance genes in ground water in comparison with surface water.

Sci Total Environ 2020 May 28;715:136975. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the water environment has become an increasing concern. There have been many reports on ARGs in surface water, but little is known about ARGs in groundwater. In this study, we investigated the profiles and abundance of ARGs in groundwater in comparison with those in surface water of Maozhou River using high-throughput quantitative PCR (HT-qPCR). Totally 127 ARGs and 10 MGEs were detected by HT-qPCR, and among them the sulfonamides, multidrug and aminoglycosides resistance genes were the dominant ARG types. According to the results of HT-qPCR, 18 frequently detected ARGs conferring resistance to 6 classes of antibiotics and 3 MGEs were further quantified by qPCR in the wet season and dry season. The absolute abundance ranged from 1.23 × 10 to 8.89 × 10 copies/mL in wet season and from 8.50 × 10 to 2.65 × 10 copies/mL in the dry season, with sul1 and sul2 being the most abundant ARGs. The absolute abundance of ARGs and MGEs has no significant difference between the wet season and dry season while the diversity of ARGs in the dry season was higher than that in the wet season (p < 0.05). Totally 141 and 150 ARGs were detected in the water and sediments of Maozhou River, respectively. A total of 116 ARGs were shared among the groundwater, river water, and sediment, which accounted for 67.1% of all detected genes. Redundancy analysis further demonstrated that the environmental factors contributed 70.7% of the total ARG variations. The findings of large shared ARGs, abundant Total Coliforms and large wastewater burden in the groundwater provide a clear evidence that anthropogenic activities had a significant impact on groundwater.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.136975DOI Listing
May 2020

Swine farming elevated the proliferation of Acinetobacter with the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in the groundwater.

Environ Int 2020 03 27;136:105484. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Swine farming generates a large amount of wastes containing various contaminants, resulting in environmental contamination and human health problems. Here we investigated the contamination profiles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) as well as microbial community in groundwater of the two villages with or without swine farms, and then assessed the human exposure risks of antibiotics, ARGs and indicator bacteria through drinking groundwater. The results showed that swine farming could lead to enhanced concentration levels of various veterinary antibiotics and ARGs in the groundwater in comparison to the reference village without swine farming. The microbial diversity of groundwater was significantly decreased with predominance of conditional pathogens Acinetobacter (up to 90%) in some wells of the swine farming village. Meanwhile, the abundance of Acinetobacter was significantly correlated to bacterial abundance, ARGs and integrons. The local residents could ingest various antibiotic residues and ARGs as well as pathogens, with daily intake of Acinetobacter up to approximately 10 billion CFU/resident through drinking groundwater contaminated by swine farming. The findings from this study suggest potential health risks of changing gut microbial community and resistome by drinking contaminated groundwater.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2020.105484DOI Listing
March 2020

Variation of antibiotic resistome during commercial livestock manure composting.

Environ Int 2020 03 8;136:105458. Epub 2020 Jan 8.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China; School of Environment, South China Normal University, University Town, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Composting has been widely used to turn livestock manure into organic fertilizer. However, livestock manure contains various contaminants including antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Here we investigated the variation of antibiotic resistome and its influencing factors during a commercial livestock manure composting. The results showed that composting could effectively reduce the relative abundance of ARGs and mobile genic elements (MGEs). As the dominant phylum in the composting samples, the key potential bacterial host of ARGs were Actinobacteria such as Leucobacter, Mycobacterium and Thermomonosporaceae unclassified. Meanwhile, Legionella pneumophila, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Haemophilus ducreyi and Siccibacter turicensis may be the key potential pathogenic host of ARGs because of their co-occurrence with ARG subtypes. Redundancy analysis showed that the dissipation of ARGs during composting was linked to various environmental factors such as moisture. Bacterial succession as well as profile of biocide and metal resistance genes (BMRGs) were the determinants which constructed the antibiotic resistome during manure composting. However, the residues of ARGs and pathogens in compost products may still pose risks to human and crops after fertilization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2020.105458DOI Listing
March 2020

Microbial diversity and antibiotic resistome in swine farm environments.

Sci Total Environ 2019 Oct 29;685:197-207. Epub 2019 May 29.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety, MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Theoretical Chemistry, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Swine feedlots are recognized as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). However, the microbiome and antibiotic resistome in swine wastewater and its impact on receiving environments remain to be further explored by culture independent metagenomics. We investigated the microbial diversity of swine wastewater and the receiving environments in three swine farms by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Metagenomic sequencing was utilized to further study the antibiotic resistome in the different depths of soils in vegetable fields, which had been fertilized with swine wastewater for at least 24 years. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the microbiome of the well water, fishpond, vegetables and the field soils was affected by the respective swine farms. Significant positive correlations were found between 20 ARGs and 41 genus of bacteria across all environmental samples. The metagenomic sequencing showed that a total of 79 types of ARGs were found in soil cores (at depth of 0-20 cm, 20-40 cm and 40-70 cm) and the irrigation water (swine wastewater). Antibiotics were detected in vertical soil profiles and wastewater. Compared with the vegetable fields without animal manure application, the soils irrigated with swine wastewater harbored higher diversity of ARGs and contained higher concentrations of antibiotics. Co-occurrence of integron-related scaffolds was found in different depths of soil cores and the swine wastewater. The results suggest that environmental microbiome was changed under the impact of swine farms, and long-term manure/wastewater application have resulted in the accumulation of ARGs in deeper soils Prudent use of antibiotics and reasonable management of animal wastes in livestock feedlots should therefore be considered to reduce the dissemination of antibiotic resistance to the environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.369DOI Listing
October 2019

Fate and removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in hybrid constructed wetlands.

Environ Pollut 2019 Jun 30;249:894-903. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

The Environmental Research Institute, MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Theoretical Chemistry, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510006, China. Electronic address:

Hybrid design and artificial aeration has been widely applied in wetlands, but little is known about their effectiveness in the removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Here we investigated the performance of various mesocosm-scale constructed wetlands (CWs) with artificial aeration and hybrid design in removal of antibiotics and ARGs from antibiotics-spiked domestic sewage. Four hybrid constructed wetland systems with zeolite as substrate and Iris tectorum Maxim as plant were set up to have different artificial aeration designs. The aqueous removal efficiencies of total antibiotics ranged from 87.4% to 95.3%, while those of total ARGs varied from 87.8% to 99.1%. The mass removal of antibiotics by the CWs was attributed mainly to the microbial degradation. The present study imply that sorption of substrates and biological processes could be the two main mechanisms for ARGs elimination. The results from this study showed the hybrid CWs with artificial aeration could enhance treatment efficiencies of antibiotics and ARGs as well as conventional pollutants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.03.111DOI Listing
June 2019

Bioaccumulation, metabolism, and risk assessment of phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals in specific tissues of wild fish.

Chemosphere 2019 Jul 1;226:607-615. Epub 2019 Apr 1.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, 510640, China; SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, 510006, China.

Phenolic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may pose a great hazard to wildlife and humans, owing to their ubiquitous presence in the environment and potential bioaccumulation ability. We investigated the bioaccumulation, metabolism, and human health risks of six phenolic EDCs, including bisphenol A (BPA), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), in wild fish from the Pearl River system, South China. Except EE2, the other five EDCs were detected in at least one of the four fish tissues (bile, liver, plasma, and muscle). The concentrations of BPA and 4-NP were greater than those of 4-t-OP, E1, and E2 in all tissues. The median values of log bioaccumulation factors for EDCs at the range of 3.86-4.52 in bile, 2.06-3.16 in liver, 2.69-3.87 in plasma, and 1.34-2.30 in muscle, indicating a higher bioaccumulation potential in fish bile than in other tissues. Greater levels of glucuronide/sulfate conjugated EDCs were found in fish bile and liver than in the plasma and muscle, suggesting that the liver and bile played an important role in the metabolism and excretion of phenolic EDCs in fish. The calculated hazard quotient values were below 1 for each compound, implying low risk to human health by intake of edible fish.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.03.187DOI Listing
July 2019

Bioaccumulation and risks of 24 personal care products in plasma of wild fish from the Yangtze River, China.

Sci Total Environ 2019 May 12;665:810-819. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

We used a hybrid precipitation method to simultaneously extract and analyze 24 personal care products (PCPs), including 16 biocides, 4 synthetic musks, and 4 benzotriazoles, in the plasma of fish. The method's performance was validated for plasma samples with and without β-glucuronidase/aryl-sulfatase hydrolysis. The recoveries were in the range of 70-120% for most of the PCPs, except N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), clotrimazole (CTZ), miconazole and itraconazole at spiking concentration of 20 and 5 ng/mL. The quantification limits ranged between 0.89 and 17.9 ng/mL (hydrolyzed plasma) and 0.85-18.5 ng/mL (non-hydrolyzed plasma), except CTZ at 77.5 ng/mL and 76.3 ng/mL. Totally, 13 PCPs were detected in plasma samples of fish collected from the Yangtze River, with a maximum concentration of 58.4 ng/mL (galaxolide). Compounds with the phenol hydroxyl groups of parabens or triclosan in hydrolyzed plasma showed higher concentrations than those in unhydrolyzed plasma with the ratio of conjugation (glucuronides + sulfates) forms up to 86%. The median values for the logarithm of bioaccumulation factors were between 1.39 and 4.15, which were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical logarithm of bioconcentration factors. Using the fish plasma model, the effect ratios (effect concentration/measured plasma concentration ratios) of tonalide, galaxolide, benzotriazole, triclosan, and DEET reached 0.35, 4.15, 3.78, 7.52, and 9.24, respectively. These are recognized as priority chemicals for further risk assessment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.176DOI Listing
May 2019

Persistence of androgens, progestogens, and glucocorticoids during commercial animal manure composting process.

Sci Total Environ 2019 May 8;665:91-99. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

SCNU Environmental Research Institute, Provincial Key Laboratory of Chemical Pollution and Environmental Safety & MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Theoretical Chemistry, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Animal manure contains various organic contaminants such as steroids. The fate of these steroids during composting is still unknown. Here we investigated the fate of androgens, progestogens, and glucocorticoids during animal manure composting and evaluated their residues in compost-applied soils. The results showed the presence of 16 steroid hormones in the initial compost with concentrations ranging from 3.26 ng/g dw (Cortisol) to 2520 ng/g dw (5α-dihydroprogesterone). The concentrations of almost all detected hormones increased on the 2nd day of composting, and some of them increased several or even dozens of times. Steroids such as hydroxyprogesterone caproate, melengestrol acetate, and methyltestosterone were not found in the initial compost but later detected during the composting process. After 171 days of composting, only 40.4% of detected steroid hormones was removed, and the total concentration of detected steroids was still as high as 3210 ng/g dw. The removal rates of some target compounds were negative, especially for the natural androgens androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione and the synthetic androgen 17β-boldenone whose concentrations significantly increased by the end of composting, indicating conversion from their conjugates or transformation from other steroids. The steroid hormones were mainly eliminated in the first three weeks; prolonged composting time did not obviously promote further removal. The variations in steroid concentration were related to the changes in compost properties such as pH and temperature during the composting process. The dissipation of steroid hormones was also linked to the changes of microbial communities in the compost to some extent. Twelve steroids were detected in the compost-treated soils of a kailyard, while 26 steroid hormones were detected in the roots of Chinese cabbages grown on the soil. The results suggest that the application of manure compost product can lead to soil contamination and plant uptake.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.120DOI Listing
May 2019

Fate of veterinary antibiotics during animal manure composting.

Sci Total Environ 2019 Feb 12;650(Pt 1):1363-1370. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

The Environmental Research Institute, MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Theoretical Chemistry, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Antibiotics are widely used in animals for disease treatment and prevention. After use, these antibiotics end up in manure. Here we investigated the fate of veterinary antibiotics in animal manure during composting and their residues in manure-applied soils. The results showed that 64.7% of the detected veterinary antibiotics were removed after composting for 171 days, which mainly occurred at the thermophilic phase in the second week, followed by a long stable stage with limited variations. The removal rates for lincomycin, trimethoprim and the macrolides during the composting were >89.7%, while those for the sulfonamides, tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones were less than <63.7%. The dissipation of antibiotics during the composting was related to the change of compost physicochemical properties, especially moisture and C/N ratio. The application of compost products with antibiotic residues could still lead to soil contamination, which may pose risks of resistance selection to the soil ecosystem.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.147DOI Listing
February 2019

Occurrence, fate and mass loadings of antibiotics in two swine wastewater treatment systems.

Sci Total Environ 2018 Oct 26;639:1421-1431. Epub 2018 May 26.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China; The Environmental Research Institute, MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Theoretical Chemistry, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

Antibiotics are widely applied in livestock industry to prevent or treat animal diseases. However, those antibiotics are poorly metabolized in livestock animals, most of them being excreted via feces or urine. Hence we need to understand the removal of antibiotics in swine farm wastewater treatment systems. This study investigated occurrence and fate of various antibiotics in two full-scale swine farm wastewater treatment systems (Farm A: anaerobic digester-A/O-lagoon; Farm B: upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-(A/O)-lagoon). The results showed the presence of 25 antibiotics out of 40 target antibiotics in the wastewater and sludge samples from the two farms. In Farm A, sulfamonomethoxine, sulfachlorpyridazine, oxytetracycline and lincomycin were predominant in the influent with concentrations up to 166 ± 3.64 μg/L, while in the dewatered sludge chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, tetracycline and norfloxacin were the predominant target compounds with concentrations up to 29.2 ± 3.74 μg/g. In Farm B, high concentrations (up to 3630 ± 1040 μg/L) of sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamonomethoxine and lincomycin were detected in the influent, and the predominant target antibiotics detected in the dewater sludge were similar to those in Farm A, with concentrations up to 28.6 ± 0.592 μg/g. The aqueous removal rates for the total antibiotics were >99.0% in the wastewater treatment plants of both farms. Among a series of treatment units, the anaerobic digester in Farm A and UASB in Farm B made a significant contribution to the elimination of the target antibiotics from the animal wastewater. The daily mass loadings of total antibiotics in the manure, influent, dewatered sludge and effluent were 17.1, 28.0, 2.53, and 0.0730 g/d for Farm A and 24.5, 354, 3.17, and 0.293 g/d for Farm B. The full-scale swine wastewater treatment facilities could effectively remove antibiotics from swine wastewater, but the dewatered sludge needs to be further treated before disposal on land.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.05.230DOI Listing
October 2018

Persistence of antibiotic resistance genes and bacterial community changes in drinking water treatment system: From drinking water source to tap water.

Sci Total Environ 2018 Mar 9;616-617:453-461. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, CAS Centre for Pearl River Delta Environmental Pollution and Control Research, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China; The Environmental Research Institute, MOE Key Laboratory of Environmental Theoretical Chemistry, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

As emerging contaminants, antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have become a public concern. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence and diversity of ARGs, and variation in the composition of bacterial communities in source water, drinking water treatment plants, and tap water in the Pearl River Delta region, South China. Various ARGs were present in the different types of water. Among the 27 target ARGs, floR and sul1 dominated in source water from three large rivers in the region. Pearson correlation analysis suggested that sul1, sul2, floR, and cmlA could be potential indicators for ARGs in water samples. The total abundance of the detected ARGs in tap water was much lower than that in source water. Sand filtration and sedimentation in drinking water treatment plants could effectively remove ARGs; in contrast, granular activated carbon filtration increased the abundance of ARGs. It was found that Pseudomonas may be involved in the proliferation and dissemination of ARGs in the studied drinking water treatment system. Bacteria and ARGs were still present in tap water after treatment, though they were significantly reduced. More research is needed to optimize the water treatment process for ARG removal.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.10.318DOI Listing
March 2018

Nitrogen removal and its relationship with the nitrogen-cycle genes and microorganisms in the horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands with different design parameters.

J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng 2017 Jul 10;52(8):804-818. Epub 2017 Apr 10.

a State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, CAS Research Centre for Pearl River Delta Environmental Pollution and Control , Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Guangzhou , China.

This study aims to investigate nitrogen removal and its relationship with the nitrogen-cycle genes and microorganisms in the horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (CWs) with different design parameters. Twelve mesocosm-scale CWs with four substrates and three hydraulic loading rates were set up in the outdoor. The result showed the CWs with zeolite as substrate and HLR of 20 cm/d were selected as the best choice for the TN and NH-N removal. It was found that the single-stage mesocosm-scale CWs were incapable to achieve high removals of TN and NH-N due to inefficient nitrification process in the systems. This was demonstrated by the lower abundance of the nitrification genes (AOA and AOB) than the denitrification genes (nirK and nirS), and the less diverse nitrification microorganisms than the denitrification microorganisms in the CWs. The results also show that microorganism community structure including nitrogen-cycle microorganisms in the constructed wetland systems was affected by the design parameters especially the substrate type. These findings show that nitrification is a limiting factor for the nitrogen removal by CWs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10934529.2017.1305181DOI Listing
July 2017

China Must Reduce Its Antibiotic Use.

Environ Sci Technol 2017 02 17;51(3):1072-1073. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Guangzhou 510640, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b06424DOI Listing
February 2017

Removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes from domestic sewage by constructed wetlands: Effect of flow configuration and plant species.

Sci Total Environ 2016 Nov 18;571:974-82. Epub 2016 Jul 18.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, CAS Research Centre for Pearl River Delta Environment Pollution and Control, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China.

This study aims to investigate the removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in raw domestic wastewater by various mesocosm-scale constructed wetlands (CWs) with different flow configurations or plant species including the constructed wetland with or without plant. Six mesocosm-scale CWs with three flow types (surface flow, horizontal subsurface flow and vertical subsurface flow) and two plant species (Thaliadealbata Fraser and Iris tectorum Maxim) were set up in the outdoor. 8 antibiotics including erythromycin-H2O (ETM-H2O), monensin (MON), clarithromycin (CTM), leucomycin (LCM), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), trimethoprim (TMP), sulfamethazine (SMZ) and sulfapyridine (SPD) and 12 genes including three sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3), four tetracycline resistance genes (tetG, tetM, tetO and tetX), two macrolide resistance genes (ermB and ermC), two chloramphenicol resistance genes (cmlA and floR) and 16S rRNA (bacteria) were determined in different matrices (water, particle, substrate and plant phases) from the mesocosm-scale systems. The aqueous removal efficiencies of total antibiotics ranged from 75.8 to 98.6%, while those of total ARGs varied between 63.9 and 84.0% by the mesocosm-scale CWs. The presence of plants was beneficial to the removal of pollutants, and the subsurface flow CWs had higher pollutant removal than the surface flow CWs, especially for antibiotics. According to the mass balance analysis, the masses of all detected antibiotics during the operation period were 247,000, 4920-10,600, 0.05-0.41 and 3500-60,000μg in influent, substrate, plant and effluent of the mesocosm-scale CWs. In the CWs, biodegradation, substrate adsorption and plant uptake all played certain roles in reducing the loadings of nutrients, antibiotics and ARGs, but biodegradation was the most important process in the removal of these pollutants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.07.085DOI Listing
November 2016

Removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes from domestic sewage by constructed wetlands: Optimization of wetland substrates and hydraulic loading.

Sci Total Environ 2016 Sep 9;565:240-248. Epub 2016 May 9.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, CAS Research Centre for Pearl River Delta Environmental Pollution and Control, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China.

This study aimed to assess removal potential of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in raw domestic wastewater by various mesocosm-scale horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (CWs) planted Cyperus alternifolius L. with different design parameters. Twelve CWs with three hydraulic loading rates (HLR 10, 20 and 30cm/day) and four substrates (oyster shell, zeolite, medical stone and ceramic) were set up in order to select the best optimized wetland. The result showed that 7 target antibiotics compounds including erythromycin-H2O, lincomycin, monensin, ofloxacin, sulfamerazine, sulfamethazine and novobiocin were detected, and all selected 18 genes (three sulfonamide resistance genes (sul1, sul2 and sul3), four tetracycline resistance genes (tetG, tetM, tetO and tetX), two macrolide resistance genes (ermB and ermC), three quinolone resistance genes (qnrB, qnrD and qnrS) and four chloramphenicol resistance genes (cmlA, fexA, fexB and floR)) and two integrase genes (int1 and int2) were positively detected in the domestic wastewaters. The aqueous removal rates of the total antibiotics ranged from17.9 to 98.5%, while those for the total ARGs varied between 50.0 and 85.8% by the mesocosm-scale CWs. After considering their aqueous removal rates in combination with their mass removals, the CW with zeolite as the substrate and HLR of 20cm/day was selected as the best choice. Combined chemical and biological analyses indicate that both microbial degradation and physical sorption processes were responsible for the fate of antibiotics and ARGs in the wetlands. The findings from this study suggest constructed wetlands could be a promising technology for the removal of emerging contaminants such as antibiotics and ARGs in domestic wastewater.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.04.176DOI Listing
September 2016

Discharge of swine wastes risks water quality and food safety: Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes from swine sources to the receiving environments.

Environ Int 2016 Jul-Aug;92-93:210-9. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, CAS Centre for Pearl River Delta Environmental Pollution and Control Research, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China.

Swine feedlots are widely considered as a potential hotspot for promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. ARGs could enter the environment via discharge of animal wastes, thus resulting in contamination of soil, water, and food. We investigated the dissemination and diversification of 22 ARGs conferring resistance to sulfonamides, tetracyclines, chloramphenicols, and macrolides as well as the occurrence of 18 corresponding antibiotics from three swine feedlots to the receiving water, soil environments and vegetables. Most ARGs and antibiotics survived the on-farm waste treatment processes in the three swine farms. Elevated diversity of ARGs was observed in the receiving environments including river water and vegetable field soils when compared with respective controls. The variation of ARGs along the vertical soil profiles of vegetable fields indicated enrichment and migration of ARGs. Detection of various ARGs and antibiotic residues in vegetables fertilized by swine wastes could be of great concern to the general public. This research demonstrated the contribution of swine wastes to the occurrence and development of antibiotic resistance determinants in the receiving environments and potential risks to food safety and human health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2016.03.023DOI Listing
January 2018

Occurrence and removal of progestagens in two representative swine farms: Effectiveness of lagoon and digester treatment.

Water Res 2015 Jun 3;77:146-154. Epub 2015 Apr 3.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, CAS Research Centre for PRD Environmental Pollution and Control, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China.

A total of 21 progestagens were screened in animal wastes and environmental samples from two representative swine farms and surrounding environments of South China using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) to assess the effectiveness of simple lagoon (and digester) treatment. The results showed that 11, 8 and 8 of 21 target progestagens were detected with the minimum concentration of 2.31 ng/L and maximum of 6150 ng/L in the water samples, with the minimum of 1.36 ng/L and maximum of 98.3 ng/L in the suspended particles, and with the minimum of 1.57 ng/g dry weight (dw) and maximum of 3310 ng/g dw in the solid samples, respectively. Trace levels (a few ng/L or ng/g levels) of dydrogesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone, norgestrel and progesterone were found in samples from nearby surface waters and vegetable fields impacted by animal wastes. The residual progestagens at the reported levels may still pose potential risks to aquatic organisms such as fish in the receiving aquatic environments. This finding suggests that swine wastewater and feces could lead to contamination of some detectable progestagens in the surrounding environments. Significant reduction in total progestagen concentrations were observed from the fresh swine wastewaters to the fish ponds, indicating effective removal of these compounds by the lagoon (and digester) treatment. In addition, the biogas digesters provided high removal of the progestagens in the waste streams. This low-cost and eco-friendly treatment system should be promoted in developing countries with concentrated animal operations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2015.03.022DOI Listing
June 2015

Joint antibacterial activity of soil-adsorbed antibiotics trimethoprim and sulfamethazine.

Sci Total Environ 2015 Feb 15;506-507:58-65. Epub 2014 Nov 15.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China.

Trimethoprim (TMP) and sulfamethazine (SMZ) are two antibiotics that are often administered in combination. We investigated the sorption and desorption behaviors of TMP and SMZ individually as single solute and in combination as co-solute in three representative soils, and evaluated joint antibacterial activity of the soil-adsorbed antibiotics to a reference strain Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. Comparative sorption tests showed that co-solute sorption of TMP and SMZ was not considerably different from their single sorption. Soil-adsorbed TMP was found to effectively inhibit the growth of E. coli at environmentally relevant concentrations in all three soils, and moreover co-presence of SMZ enhanced the antibacterial effects on bacteria both in its dissolved form and soil-adsorbed form. Overall, the results from this study suggest that various soil-adsorbed antibiotic residues could play a joint influencing role in soil bacterial community activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.10.117DOI Listing
February 2015

Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in representative broiler feedlots environments: identification of indicator ARGs and correlations with environmental variables.

Environ Sci Technol 2014 Nov 3;48(22):13120-9. Epub 2014 Nov 3.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, CAS Centre for Pearl River Delta Environmental Pollution and Control Research, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Guangzhou 510640, China.

Livestock operations are known to harbor elevated levels of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) that may pose a threat to public health. Broiler feedlots may represent an important source of ARGs in the environment. However, the prevalence and dissemination mechanisms of various types of ARGs in the environment of broiler feedlots have not previously been identified. We examined the occurrence, abundance and variation of ARGs conferring resistance to chloramphenicols, sulfonamides and tetracyclines in the environments of two representative types of broiler feedlots (free range and indoor) by quantitative PCR, and assessed their dissemination mechanisms. The results showed the prevalence of various types of ARGs in the environmental samples of the broiler feedlots including manure/litter, soil, sediment, and water samples, with the first report of five chloramphenicol resistance genes (cmlA, floR, fexA, cfr, and fexB) in broiler feedlots. Overall, chloramphenicol resistance genes and sulfonamides sul genes were more abundant than tetracyclines tet genes. The ARG abundances in the samples from indoor boiler feedlots were generally different to the free range feedlots, suggesting the importance of feeding operations in ARG dissemination. Pearson correlation analysis showed significant correlations between ARGs and mobile genetic element genes (int1 and int2), and between the different classes of ARGs themselves, revealing the roles of horizontal gene transfer and coselection for ARG dissemination in the environment. Further regression analysis revealed that fexA, sul1 and tetW could be reliable indicator genes to surrogate anthropogenic sources of ARGs in boiler feedlots (correlations of fexA, sul1 and tetW to all ARGs: R = 0.95, 0.96 and 0.86, p < 0.01). Meanwhile, significant correlations were also identified between indicator ARGs and their corresponding antibiotics. In addition, some ARGs were significantly correlated with typical metals (e.g., Cu, Zn, and As with fexA, fexB, cfr, sul1, tetW, tetO, tetS: R = 0.52-0.71) and some environmental parameters (e.g., TOC, TN, TP, NH3-N with fexA, fexB, cfr, sul1, tetW, tetO, tetQ, tetS: R = 0.53-0.87) (p < 0.01). Further redundancy analysis demonstrated that the distribution and transportation of ARGs from the boiler feedlots to the receiving environments were correlated with environmental variables. The findings highlight the contribution of some chemicals such as antibiotics and metals to the development of ARGs in broiler feedlots environments; and the observed ARG dissemination mechanism in the broiler feedlots facilitates the development of effective mitigation measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es5041267DOI Listing
November 2014

Contamination profiles of antibiotic resistance genes in the sediments at a catchment scale.

Sci Total Environ 2014 Aug 5;490:708-14. Epub 2014 Jun 5.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, CAS Centre for Pearl River Delta Environmental Pollution and Control Research, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China.

The aim of this study was to investigate the contamination profiles of tetracycline, sulfonamide, and macrolide resistance genes, as well as integrons in sediments of Dongjiang River basin of South China by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. sul2 was the most abundant resistance gene, with the average concentration of 6.97×10(8) copies/g and 1.00×10(8) copies/g in the dry and wet seasons, respectively, followed by ermF, sul3, sul1, intI1, tetA, ermB, tetX, tetM, tetQ, tetO, tetW, tetS, ermC, and tetB. The abundance of intI2 gene was the lowest in the sediment samples. Significant correlations existed between the ARGs and sediment properties as well as metals (Cu and Zn) and corresponding antibiotic classes, suggesting that the contamination of ARGs is related to chemical pollution of the sediments in the river basin. Principal component analysis showed distinct groupings of the sampling sites, reflecting that human activities are the key player in the dissemination of ARGs in the catchment environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2014.05.060DOI Listing
August 2014

Removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in rural wastewater by an integrated constructed wetland.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2015 Feb 1;22(3):1794-803. Epub 2014 Apr 1.

State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, 510640, China.

Integrated constructed wetlands (ICWs) are regarded as one of the most important removal technology for pollutants in rural domestic wastewaters. This study investigated the efficiency of an ICW consisting of a regulating pool, four surface and subsurface flow-constructed wetlands, and a stabilization unit for removing antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from rural domestic wastewaters. The results showed that antibiotics leucomycin, ofloxacin, lincomycin, and sulfamethazine, and ARGs sul1, sul2, tetM, and tetO were the predominant antibiotics and ARGs in the influent, respectively. The ICW system could significantly reduce most of the detected antibiotics and ARGs with their aqueous removal rates of 78 to 100 % and >99 %, respectively. Based on the measured concentrations, the total pollution loadings of antibiotics were 3,479 μg/day in the influent and 199 μg/day in the final effluent. Therefore, constructed wetlands could be a promising technology for rural wastewater in removing contaminants such as antibiotics and ARGs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-014-2800-4DOI Listing
February 2015
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