Publications by authors named "Leyla Namazova-Baranova"

57 Publications

A randomized trial assessing the efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of vaccination with live attenuated varicella zoster virus-containing vaccines: ten-year follow-up in Russian children.

Hum Vaccin Immunother 2021 Aug 26:1-12. Epub 2021 Aug 26.

GSK, Wavre, Belgium.

In Russia, a universal varicella vaccination (UVV) program has not been implemented, and varicella vaccination coverage is low. We assessed the efficacy, antibody persistence, and safety of one- and two-dose varicella vaccination schedules in Russian children with a ten-year follow-up period, as part of an international phase IIIB, observer-blind, randomized, controlled trial (NCT00226499). Children aged 12-22 months were randomized (3:3:1) to receive two doses of tetravalent measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine (V2 group), one dose trivalent measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and one dose of varicella vaccine (V1 group), or two doses of MMR vaccine (V0 [control] group), 42 days apart. Main study outcomes were: vaccine efficacy (VE) against confirmed varicella cases, anti-varicella zoster virus (VZV) seropositivity rates and geometric mean concentrations, and reporting of (serious) adverse events ([S]AEs). The total vaccinated cohort in Russia comprised 1000 children; 900 were followed up until study end (year [Y] 10). VE estimates against confirmed varicella (Y10) were 92.4% in the V2 group and 74.7% in the V1 group. Anti-VZV seropositivity rates remained ≥99.4% in the V2 group and ≥89.7% in the V1 group from day 42 post-vaccination 2 until Y10. Occurrence of (un)solicited AEs and SAEs was similar across groups and confirmed the safety profile of the vaccines. No vaccination-related SAEs or deaths were reported. These results are consistent with the global trial results, i.e., the highest VE estimates observed following the two-dose schedule compared to the one-dose schedule. These data may inform decision-making related to potential implementation of a UVV program.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21645515.2021.1959148DOI Listing
August 2021

Effects of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) on Family Functioning.

J Pediatr 2021 Oct 3;237:322-323.e2. Epub 2021 Jul 3.

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations, Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2021.06.082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8253665PMC
October 2021

Increased Exposure to Violence and Risk of Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Children.

J Pediatr 2021 Sep 5;236:335-336.e2. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2021.06.001DOI Listing
September 2021

Children Witnessing Domestic and Family Violence: A Widespread Occurrence during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Pandemic.

J Pediatr 2021 08 5;235:305-306.e2. Epub 2021 May 5.

European Pediatric Association/Union of National European Pediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2021.04.071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8491993PMC
August 2021

Practical algorithm to inform clinical decision-making in the topical treatment of atopic dermatitis.

J Dermatol 2021 Aug 7;48(8):1139-1148. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing Key Laboratory of Molecular Diagnosis on Dermatoses, National Clinical Research Center for Skin and Immune Diseases, Beijing, China.

Atopic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing, inflammatory skin disorder associated with skin barrier dysfunction, the prevalence of which has increased dramatically in developing countries. In this article, we propose a treatment algorithm for patients with mild-to-moderate and severe atopic dermatitis flares in daily clinical practice. An international panel of 15 dermatology and allergy experts from eight countries was formed to develop a practical algorithm for the treatment of patients with atopic dermatitis, with a particular focus on topical therapies. In cases of mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis involving sensitive skin areas, the topical calcineurin inhibitor pimecrolimus should be applied twice daily at the first signs of atopic dermatitis. For other body locations, patients should apply a topical calcineurin inhibitor, either pimecrolimus or tacrolimus, twice daily at the first signs of atopic dermatitis, such as pruritus, or twice weekly in previously affected skin areas. Emollients should be used regularly. Patients experiencing acute atopic dermatitis flares in sensitive skin areas should apply a topical corticosteroid twice daily or alternate once-daily topical corticosteroid/topical calcineurin inhibitor until symptoms improve. Following improvement, topical corticosteroid therapy should be discontinued and patients switched to a topical calcineurin inhibitor. Maintenance therapy should include the use of pimecrolimus once daily for sensitive areas and tacrolimus for other body locations. This treatment algorithm can help guide clinical decision-making in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.15921DOI Listing
August 2021

Prevention and contrast of child abuse and neglect in the practice of European paediatricians: a multi-national pilot study.

Ital J Pediatr 2021 May 3;47(1):105. Epub 2021 May 3.

Campus Bio-Medico University Medical School, Rome, Italy.

Background: Child abuse and neglect, or maltreatment, is a serious public health problem, which may cause long-term effects on children's health and wellbeing and expose them to further adulthood vulnerabilities. Studies on child maltreatment performed in Europe are scarce, and the number of participants enrolled relatively small. The aim of this multi-national European pilot study, was to evaluate the level of understanding and perception of the concepts of child abuse and neglect by European paediatricians working in different medical settings, and the attitude toward these forms of maltreatment in their practice.

Methods: The study was performed by a cross-sectional, descriptive, online survey, made available online to European paediatricians members of 50 national paediatric, who belonged to four different medical settings: hospital, family care, university centres and private practice. The questionnaire, designed as a multiple choice questions survey, with a single answer option consisted of 22 questions/statements. Frequency analyses were applied. Most of the data were described using univariate analysis and Chi-squared tests were used to compare the respondents and answers and a significance level of p ≤ 0.05 applied.

Results: Findings show that European paediatricians consider the training on child maltreatment currently provided by medical school curricula and paediatric residency courses to be largely insufficient and continuing education courses were considered of great importance to cover educational gaps. Physical violence was recognized by paediatricians mostly during occasional visits with a significant correlation between detecting abuse during an occasional visit and being a primary care paediatrician. Results also showed a reluctance by paediatricians to report cases of maltreatment to the competent judicial authorities.

Conclusions: Data of this study may provide useful contribution to the current limited knowledge about the familiarity of European paediatricians with child maltreatment and their skills to recognize, manage and contrast abusive childhood experiences in their practice. Finally, they could provide local legislators and health authorities with information useful to further improve public health approaches and rules able to effectively address shared risk and protective factors, which could prevent child abuse and neglect from ever occurring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13052-021-01055-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8094489PMC
May 2021

Management of anaphylaxis due to COVID-19 vaccines in the elderly.

Allergy 2021 10;76(10):2952-2964

Regional Ministry of Health of Andalusia, Seville, Spain.

Older adults, especially men and/or those with diabetes, hypertension, and/or obesity, are prone to severe COVID-19. In some countries, older adults, particularly those residing in nursing homes, have been prioritized to receive COVID-19 vaccines due to high risk of death. In very rare instances, the COVID-19 vaccines can induce anaphylaxis, and the management of anaphylaxis in older people should be considered carefully. An ARIA-EAACI-EuGMS (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma, European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, and European Geriatric Medicine Society) Working Group has proposed some recommendations for older adults receiving the COVID-19 vaccines. Anaphylaxis to COVID-19 vaccines is extremely rare (from 1 per 100,000 to 5 per million injections). Symptoms are similar in younger and older adults but they tend to be more severe in the older patients. Adrenaline is the mainstay treatment and should be readily available. A flowchart is proposed to manage anaphylaxis in the older patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.14838DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8251336PMC
October 2021

Analysis of structural brain asymmetries in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 39 datasets.

J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2021 Oct 22;62(10):1202-1219. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

Objective: Some studies have suggested alterations of structural brain asymmetry in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but findings have been contradictory and based on small samples. Here, we performed the largest ever analysis of brain left-right asymmetry in ADHD, using 39 datasets of the ENIGMA consortium.

Methods: We analyzed asymmetry of subcortical and cerebral cortical structures in up to 1,933 people with ADHD and 1,829 unaffected controls. Asymmetry Indexes (AIs) were calculated per participant for each bilaterally paired measure, and linear mixed effects modeling was applied separately in children, adolescents, adults, and the total sample, to test exhaustively for potential associations of ADHD with structural brain asymmetries.

Results: There was no evidence for altered caudate nucleus asymmetry in ADHD, in contrast to prior literature. In children, there was less rightward asymmetry of the total hemispheric surface area compared to controls (t = 2.1, p = .04). Lower rightward asymmetry of medial orbitofrontal cortex surface area in ADHD (t = 2.7, p = .01) was similar to a recent finding for autism spectrum disorder. There were also some differences in cortical thickness asymmetry across age groups. In adults with ADHD, globus pallidus asymmetry was altered compared to those without ADHD. However, all effects were small (Cohen's d from -0.18 to 0.18) and would not survive study-wide correction for multiple testing.

Conclusion: Prior studies of altered structural brain asymmetry in ADHD were likely underpowered to detect the small effects reported here. Altered structural asymmetry is unlikely to provide a useful biomarker for ADHD, but may provide neurobiological insights into the trait.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13396DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8455726PMC
October 2021

Childhood asthma outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic: Findings from the PeARL multi-national cohort.

Allergy 2021 06 24;76(6):1765-1775. Epub 2021 Mar 24.

VN Allergy & Asthma Research Centre, Chennai, India.

Background: The interplay between COVID-19 pandemic and asthma in children is still unclear. We evaluated the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on childhood asthma outcomes.

Methods: The PeARL multinational cohort included 1,054 children with asthma and 505 non-asthmatic children aged between 4 and 18 years from 25 pediatric departments, from 15 countries globally. We compared the frequency of acute respiratory and febrile presentations during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic between groups and with data available from the previous year. In children with asthma, we also compared current and historical disease control.

Results: During the pandemic, children with asthma experienced fewer upper respiratory tract infections, episodes of pyrexia, emergency visits, hospital admissions, asthma attacks, and hospitalizations due to asthma, in comparison with the preceding year. Sixty-six percent of asthmatic children had improved asthma control while in 33% the improvement exceeded the minimal clinically important difference. Pre-bronchodilatation FEV and peak expiratory flow rate were improved during the pandemic. When compared to non-asthmatic controls, children with asthma were not at increased risk of LRTIs, episodes of pyrexia, emergency visits, or hospitalizations during the pandemic. However, an increased risk of URTIs emerged.

Conclusion: Childhood asthma outcomes, including control, were improved during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, probably because of reduced exposure to asthma triggers and increased treatment adherence. The decreased frequency of acute episodes does not support the notion that childhood asthma may be a risk factor for COVID-19. Furthermore, the potential for improving childhood asthma outcomes through environmental control becomes apparent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.14787DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8013557PMC
June 2021

Plan for the Worst, but Hope for the Best: Investing in Pediatric Services.

J Pediatr 2021 05 4;232:314-315.e1. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations, Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Istanbul University Cerrahpaşa, Medical Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2021.02.001DOI Listing
May 2021

The Dark Side of the Web-A Risk for Children and Adolescents Challenged by Isolation during the Novel Coronavirus 2019 Pandemic.

J Pediatr 2021 01 10;228:324-325.e2. Epub 2020 Oct 10.

European Paediatric Association, Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.10.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7547580PMC
January 2021

Children facing natural, economic and public health crisis in Europe: The risks of a predictable unpredictability.

Turk Pediatri Ars 2020 1;55(Suppl 1):4-9. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

European Pediatric Association (EPA-UNEPSA), Union of National European Pediatric Societies and Associations, Berlin, Germany.

This opening article for the volume dedicated to the diversity of paediatric healthcare systems in Europe, discusses the topic of children facing natural, economic, and public health crises in Europe. The natural and economic adversities and public health crises, which have repeatedly stormed the globe during the past twenty years, have often unveiled a low degree of self-sufficiency and a high degree of unpreparedness by European countries. It is always the case that the most vulnerable take the brunt, and these adverse events have shown their effects and a negative direct impact particularly on the population aged 0-18 years, with important implications for families and communities. The article discusses a rational approach to properly confront future public health emergencies and crises in general. The authors stress the concept that such approaches should be built on past negative experiences, in order to explore, identify, and make clear which are the priorities governing the disaster management activities at all levels in this population group. The authors conclude that safeguarding the health of children could be effectively accomplished by developing adequate, shared emergency management strategies. Improving pediatric preparedness approaches with the use of emergency measures and ongoing collaboration will facilitate a better and more efficient response, able to effectively care for the needs of children in actual crises.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14744/TurkPediatriArs.2020.55553DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7488185PMC
September 2020

Impact of COVID-19 on Pediatric Asthma: Practice Adjustments and Disease Burden.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2020 09 17;8(8):2592-2599.e3. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Pediatric Pulmonology, Immunology and Intensive Care Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

Background: It is unclear whether asthma may affect susceptibility or severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children and how pediatric asthma services worldwide have responded to the pandemic.

Objective: To describe the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric asthma services and on disease burden in their patients.

Methods: An online survey was sent to members of the Pediatric Asthma in Real Life think tank and the World Allergy Organization Pediatric Asthma Committee. It included questions on service provision, disease burden, and the clinical course of confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection among children with asthma.

Results: Ninety-one respondents, caring for an estimated population of more than 133,000 children with asthma, completed the survey. COVID-19 significantly impacted pediatric asthma services: 39% ceased physical appointments, 47% stopped accepting new patients, and 75% limited patients' visits. Consultations were almost halved to a median of 20 (interquartile range, 10-25) patients per week. Virtual clinics and helplines were launched in most centers. Better than expected disease control was reported in 20% (10%-40%) of patients, whereas control was negatively affected in only 10% (7.5%-12.5%). Adherence also appeared to increase. Only 15 confirmed cases of COVID-19 were reported among the population; the estimated incidence is not apparently different from the reports of general pediatric cohorts.

Conclusions: Children with asthma do not appear to be disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Outcomes may even have improved, possibly through increased adherence and/or reduced exposures. Clinical services have rapidly responded to the pandemic by limiting and replacing physical appointments with virtual encounters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2020.06.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7297686PMC
September 2020

Subcortical Brain Volume, Regional Cortical Thickness, and Cortical Surface Area Across Disorders: Findings From the ENIGMA ADHD, ASD, and OCD Working Groups.

Am J Psychiatry 2020 09 16;177(9):834-843. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

The full list of authors in the ENIGMA working groups, author affiliations, author disclosures, and acknowledgments are provided in online supplements.

Objective: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are common neurodevelopmental disorders that frequently co-occur. The authors sought to directly compare these disorders using structural brain imaging data from ENIGMA consortium data.

Methods: Structural T-weighted whole-brain MRI data from healthy control subjects (N=5,827) and from patients with ADHD (N=2,271), ASD (N=1,777), and OCD (N=2,323) from 151 cohorts worldwide were analyzed using standardized processing protocols. The authors examined subcortical volume, cortical thickness, and cortical surface area differences within a mega-analytical framework, pooling measures extracted from each cohort. Analyses were performed separately for children, adolescents, and adults, using linear mixed-effects models adjusting for age, sex, and site (and intracranial volume for subcortical and surface area measures).

Results: No shared differences were found among all three disorders, and shared differences between any two disorders did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. Children with ADHD compared with those with OCD had smaller hippocampal volumes, possibly influenced by IQ. Children and adolescents with ADHD also had smaller intracranial volume than control subjects and those with OCD or ASD. Adults with ASD showed thicker frontal cortices compared with adult control subjects and other clinical groups. No OCD-specific differences were observed across different age groups and surface area differences among all disorders in childhood and adulthood.

Conclusions: The study findings suggest robust but subtle differences across different age groups among ADHD, ASD, and OCD. ADHD-specific intracranial volume and hippocampal differences in children and adolescents, and ASD-specific cortical thickness differences in the frontal cortex in adults, support previous work emphasizing structural brain differences in these disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2020.19030331DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8296070PMC
September 2020

ARIA digital anamorphosis: Digital transformation of health and care in airway diseases from research to practice.

Allergy 2021 01 23;76(1):168-190. Epub 2020 Oct 23.

Dept of Otorhinolaryngology, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba, Japan.

Digital anamorphosis is used to define a distorted image of health and care that may be viewed correctly using digital tools and strategies. MASK digital anamorphosis represents the process used by MASK to develop the digital transformation of health and care in rhinitis. It strengthens the ARIA change management strategy in the prevention and management of airway disease. The MASK strategy is based on validated digital tools. Using the MASK digital tool and the CARAT online enhanced clinical framework, solutions for practical steps of digital enhancement of care are proposed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.14422DOI Listing
January 2021

ENIGMA and global neuroscience: A decade of large-scale studies of the brain in health and disease across more than 40 countries.

Transl Psychiatry 2020 03 20;10(1):100. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

This review summarizes the last decade of work by the ENIGMA (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta Analysis) Consortium, a global alliance of over 1400 scientists across 43 countries, studying the human brain in health and disease. Building on large-scale genetic studies that discovered the first robustly replicated genetic loci associated with brain metrics, ENIGMA has diversified into over 50 working groups (WGs), pooling worldwide data and expertise to answer fundamental questions in neuroscience, psychiatry, neurology, and genetics. Most ENIGMA WGs focus on specific psychiatric and neurological conditions, other WGs study normal variation due to sex and gender differences, or development and aging; still other WGs develop methodological pipelines and tools to facilitate harmonized analyses of "big data" (i.e., genetic and epigenetic data, multimodal MRI, and electroencephalography data). These international efforts have yielded the largest neuroimaging studies to date in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy, and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. More recent ENIGMA WGs have formed to study anxiety disorders, suicidal thoughts and behavior, sleep and insomnia, eating disorders, irritability, brain injury, antisocial personality and conduct disorder, and dissociative identity disorder. Here, we summarize the first decade of ENIGMA's activities and ongoing projects, and describe the successes and challenges encountered along the way. We highlight the advantages of collaborative large-scale coordinated data analyses for testing reproducibility and robustness of findings, offering the opportunity to identify brain systems involved in clinical syndromes across diverse samples and associated genetic, environmental, demographic, cognitive, and psychosocial factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-020-0705-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083923PMC
March 2020

Looking at the Future, Learning from the Past: Current Activities and Upcoming Goals of the European Paediatric Association, the Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations.

J Pediatr 2020 05 6;220:272-274.e1. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.02.034DOI Listing
May 2020

Toward personalization of asthma treatment according to trigger factors.

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2020 06 18;145(6):1529-1534. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Womenś and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Asthma is a severe and chronic disabling disease affecting more than 300 million people worldwide. Although in the past few drugs for the treatment of asthma were available, new treatment options are currently emerging, which appear to be highly effective in certain subgroups of patients. Accordingly, there is a need for biomarkers that allow selection of patients for refined and personalized treatment strategies. Recently, serological chip tests based on microarrayed allergen molecules and peptides derived from the most common rhinovirus strains have been developed, which may discriminate 2 of the most common forms of asthma, that is, allergen- and virus-triggered asthma. In this perspective, we argue that classification of patients with asthma according to these common trigger factors may open new possibilities for personalized management of asthma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2020.02.001DOI Listing
June 2020

The Health Risks of Electronic Cigarettes Use in Adolescents.

J Pediatr 2020 04 4;219:286-287.e3. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany; Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", Academic Group for Clinical Research in Pediatrics, Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.01.009DOI Listing
April 2020

The Burden of Depression in Adolescents and the Importance of Early Recognition.

J Pediatr 2020 03 10;218:265-267.e1. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza" SCV, Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.12.003DOI Listing
March 2020

Lifelong Negative Influence of School Violence on Children.

J Pediatr 2019 12;215:287-288.e2

European Pediatric Association/Union of National European Pediatric Societies and Associations, Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.09.075DOI Listing
December 2019

The Role of Healthy Lifestyle Promotion, Counseling, and Follow-up in Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention.

J Pediatr 2020 02 15;217:221-223.e1. Epub 2019 Nov 15.

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza" SCV, University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.10.061DOI Listing
February 2020

European Pediatricians: Speaking with One Voice to Advocate for Children and Their Health.

J Pediatr 2019 08;211:227-228

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.05.071DOI Listing
August 2019

The Risk of Gambling Disorders in Children and Adolescents.

J Pediatr 2019 07;210:245-247.e1

European Paediatric Association/Union of National European Paediatric Societies and Associations (EPA/UNEPSA), Berlin, Germany; Department of Pediatrics, Scientific Institute "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", University of Foggia, Foggia, Italy. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.04.005DOI Listing
July 2019

Prioritizing research challenges and funding for allergy and asthma and the need for translational research-The European Strategic Forum on Allergic Diseases.

Allergy 2019 11 2;74(11):2064-2076. Epub 2019 Jun 2.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Chemistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) organized the first European Strategic Forum on Allergic Diseases and Asthma. The main aim was to bring together all relevant stakeholders and decision-makers in the field of allergy, asthma and clinical Immunology around an open debate on contemporary challenges and potential solutions for the next decade. The Strategic Forum was an upscaling of the EAACI White Paper aiming to integrate the Academy's output with the perspective offered by EAACI's partners. This collaboration is fundamental for adapting and integrating allergy and asthma care into the context of real-world problems. The Strategic Forum on Allergic Diseases brought together all partners who have the drive and the influence to make positive change: national and international societies, patients' organizations, regulatory bodies and industry representatives. An open debate with a special focus on drug development and biomedical engineering, big data and information technology and allergic diseases and asthma in the context of environmental health concluded that connecting science with the transformation of care and a joint agreement between all partners on priorities and needs are essential to ensure a better management of allergic diseases and asthma in the advent of precision medicine together with global access to innovative and affordable diagnostics and therapeutics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.13856DOI Listing
November 2019
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