Publications by authors named "Levent Aydın"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Early cranioplasty associated with a lower rate of post-traumatic hydrocephalus after decompressive craniectomy for traumatic brain injury.

Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg 2020 Aug 3;46(4):919-926. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Department of Neurosurgery, Sisli Hamidiye Etfal Research and Education Hospital, University of Medical Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: Post-traumatic hydrocephalus (PTH) is one of the primary complications during the course of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to define factors associated with the development of PTH in patients who underwent unilateral decompressive craniectomy (DC) for TBI.

Methods: A total of 126 patients, who met the inclusion criteria of the study, were divided into two groups: patients with PTH (n = 25) and patients without PTH (n = 101). Their demographic, clinical, radiological, operative, and postoperative factors, which may be associated with the development of PTH, were compared.

Results: Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that cranioplasty performed later than 2 months following DC was significantly associated with the requirement for ventriculoperitoneal shunting due to PTH (p < 0.001). Also, a significant unfavorable outcome rate was observed in patients with PTH at 1-year follow-up according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (p = 0.047).

Conclusions: Our results show that early cranioplasty within 2 months after DC was associated with a lower rate of PTH development after TBI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00068-020-01409-xDOI Listing
August 2020

Cranio-Orbital Tumors: Clinical Results and A Surgical Approach.

Sisli Etfal Hastan Tip Bul 2019 27;53(3):240-246. Epub 2019 Aug 27.

Department of Neurosurgery, Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Objectives: In this study, we aimed to share the surgical approaches and clinical experiences of cranio-orbital tumors, which are surgically difficult anatomies.

Methods: A total of 22 orbital tumors with extraorbital-transcranial pathology between January 2004 and December 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. Information was obtained from hospital, operation and outpatient records for this study. Preoperative demographic data, ophthalmologic examination findings, clinical and radiological findings were recorded. All patients had cranial magnetic resonance and cranial computerised tomography examinations at this time. The location of the tumor, its size and its relation to neighboring structures were recorded in the light of these examinations.

Results: The lateral approach was performed in 12 cases. The lateral approach was performed with frontotemporal craniotomy. Because of the lateral inferior location of the tumor in three of 12 cases, zygoma osteotomy was added to classical osteotomy. In 10 cases, the anterior approach was applied and the frontal craniotomy was found sufficient in seven cases. In three cases subfrontal craniotomy was added to classical craniotomy.

Conclusion: The findings obtained in this study suggest that high resection rates can be achieved with appropriate surgical intervention in orbital tumors requiring a transcranial surgical approach. The most important factor in surgical planning is the location of the tumor. The size of the tumor and the expectation of the percentage of surgical removal are the other important factors. In our series, it has reached high excision ratio in most cases with low complication rate, good visual field and eye movements results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.14744/SEMB.2018.82698DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7192274PMC
August 2019

Reduction versus In Situ Fusion for Adult High-Grade Spondylolisthesis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

World Neurosurg 2020 06 14;138:512-520.e2. Epub 2020 Mar 14.

Computational Neurosciences Outcomes Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Surgical management of high-grade spondylolisthesis is controversial. Both reduction and in situ fusion are available options, but it remains unclear which approach provides better outcomes. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting outcomes following reduction or in situ fusion for adult high-grade spondylolisthesis.

Methods: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases were last searched on June 24, 2019. We identified 1236 studies after excluding duplicates. After screening, 15 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Random-effects models were used to pool effect estimates.

Results: A total of 188 patients were analyzed. Compared with reduction, in situ fusion had a higher mean estimated blood loss (584 mL vs. 451 mL) and a clinically higher incidence of neurologic (48% vs. 15%), pseudarthrosis (13% vs. 8%), and infectious (20% vs. 10%) complications; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Reduction was associated with a clinically higher incidence of overall complications (32% vs. 25%) and dural tears (22% vs. 7%). Reduction provided better pain relief (mean difference [MD] = 5.24 vs. 4.77) and greater change in pelvic tilt (MD = 5.33 vs. 2.60); however, these differences were not statistically significant. Patients who underwent reduction had significantly greater decline in Oswestry Disability Index scores (MD = 55.7 vs. 11.5; P < 0.01) and greater change in slip angle (MD = 25.0 vs. 11.4; P = 0.01).

Conclusions: In management of adult high-grade spondylolisthesis, both approaches appeared to be safe and effective. Reduction appeared to offer better disability relief and spinopelvic parameter correction than in situ fusion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.03.030DOI Listing
June 2020

The residue levels of spinosad and abamectin in eggs and tissues of laying hens following spray application.

Avian Pathol 2019 Sep 2;48(sup1):S44-S51. Epub 2019 Jul 2.

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bursa Uludag University , Bursa , Turkey.

Spinosad (SPN) and abamectin (ABM) are used in poultry premises to control external parasites including red mites (). This study aimed to determine levels of SPN (spinosyn A + spinosyn D) and ABM residues in egg and edible tissues of laying hens following spray application. A total of 36 laying hens were divided into four groups of nine birds each, and they were kept in individual cages. Two different concentrations of SPN (2 and 4 g/l) and ABM (0.025 and 0.033 g/l) were applied in stocked and empty cages, respectively. Eggs were collected individually for 30 days. All hens were sacrificed at day 30 post-treatment, and tissue samples (liver, breast muscle, fat and skin) were collected. The residue levels in eggs and tissues were determined by high pressure liquid chromatography. ABM residues were not detectable in egg samples. SPN residues in eggs and residues of both ABM and SPN in liver, muscle and fat were under the maximum residue limits (MRLs) following low and high concentration applications. However, although the MRLs have not been established for SPN and ABM in skin tissue of chicken, residues in the skin detected at the low and high concentrations were greater than the MRLs for other edible tissues (except fat tissue) indicating that a withdrawal period would be necessary for the skin tissue after ABM and SPN use in laying hens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03079457.2019.1623380DOI Listing
September 2019

Filtration and removal performances of membrane adsorbers.

J Hazard Mater 2017 Jun 1;332:33-41. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Mechanical Engineering Department, Izmir Katip Çelebi University, Balatçık Kampusu, Çiğli, Izmir, Turkey.

Membrane adsorbers are promising candidates for the efficient and effective removal of heavy metals in waste water due to their unattainable adsorption and filtration capabilities. In the present study, zeolite nanoparticles incorporated polysulfone (PSf10) membrane was synthesized by means of non-solvent induced phase separation technique for the removal of lead and nickel ions in water. PSf10 showed a remarkable sorption capability and after repeated (adsorption/desorption) cycles in batch experiments, it preserved 77% and 92% of its initial sorption capacity for the lead and nickel, respectively. Addition of nanoparticles increased the pore radius of the native PSf from 10 to 19nm, while bovine serum albumin rejection remained unchanged at 98%. Increments in the pore size and enhancement in hydrophilicity caused to increase hydraulic permeability of the native PSf from 23 to 57L/mhbar. Cross-flow filtration studies revealed that the filtrate concentrations were inversely affected by the initial metal concentration and transmembrane pressure due to reaction limited region. Nonlinear rational regression model perfectly described the filtration behavior of the PSf10 within the experimental range and suggested that lower initial metal concentration and pressure with a short filtration time should be selected for the target response to be minimum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2017.02.061DOI Listing
June 2017

Serological and molecular investigation of Ehrlichia spp. and Anaplasma spp. in ticks and blood of dogs, in the Thrace Region of Turkey.

Ticks Tick Borne Dis 2016 07 2;7(5):706-714. Epub 2016 Mar 2.

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, İstanbul University, İstanbul 34320, Turkey.

In recent years, tick-borne diseases like ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis became widespread worldwide threatening the health of both human and companion animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Anaplasma spp., and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs and ticks in the Thrace Region of Turkey. A total of 400 blood samples and 912 ticks were collected from dogs living in shelters that are located in four cities (Istanbul, Edirne, Tekirdag and Kirklareli) of the Thrace Region. Blood and buffy coat smears were prepared for microscopic examination. Hematologic and serologic analyses were performed using cell counter and commercial Snap3Dx test kit, respectively. Eight hundred fifty of collected ticks were classified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 33 as Rhipicephalus turanicus and 29 as Ixodes ricinus. After DNA extraction from blood samples and pooled ticks (127 tick pools, in total), nested PCR was performed to detect the DNA of Anaplasma spp., and Ehrlichia spp. The seroprevalence of Ehrlichia canis was 27.25% (109) by Snap3Dx test and the total molecular positivity was 11.75% (47) in dog blood samples and 21.25% (27) in tick pools by nested PCR. The frequencies of the infected blood samples with E. canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma platys were detected as 6%, 4% and 6%, respectively. E. canis and A. platys were detected in R. sanguineus pools with a ratio of 15.75% and 0.7%, respectively. In addition, A. platys was also detected in R. turanicus pools (0.7%). A. phagocytophilum was found only in I. ricinus pools (3.93%). Morulae of three species were detected in buffy coat and blood smears. While anemia was observed in dogs infected with E. canis and co-infected (with one or more species), thrombocytopenia was observed only in co-infected dogs. This is the first study providing evidence for the presence of Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs and ticks in the Thrace Region of Turkey. Based on the results of the tests used in this study, we recommend the combined use of serologic, molecular, cytologic, hematologic analyses and physical examination of tick exposure for an accurate diagnosis of ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ttbdis.2016.02.021DOI Listing
July 2016

Ectoparasites of hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor) from Turkey.

Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr 2015 Jul-Aug;128(7-8):315-8

Hedgehogs are small, nocturnal, spiny-coated animals that have been growing in popularity as exotic pets. However, these animals are host to a wide variety of viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites, some of which are of zoonotic character. Thus, because hedgehogs have a potential role to transmit zoonoses including arthropod-borne diseases, we examined them for their ectoparasites. The study was carried out on hedgehogs found dead mainly due to road casualties in the Bursa province of Turkey. The ectoparasites were collected by both insecticide spraying of the body and inspection on a white paper carefully. Totally three species of ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Hyalomma aegyptium, Haemophysalis parvo) and one flea species (Archeopsylla erinacei) were detected. The prevalence of mixed infestation with both ticks and fleas was 45.5%. Haemaphysalis parva was reported for the first time from hedgehogs (Erinaceus concolor) in Turkey. The occurrence of ectoparasites and their potential role as vectors of certain zoonotic diseases are briefly discussed.
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October 2015

Tick species (Acari: Ixodida) in Antalya City, Turkey: species diversity and seasonal activity.

Parasitol Res 2015 Jul 15;114(7):2581-6. Epub 2015 Apr 15.

Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Akdeniz University, 07070, Antalya, Turkey,

Ticks (Acari: Ixodida) are an important group of ectoparasites of vertebrates. Most species are known vectors of diseases including Lyme disease, Q fever, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. A 3-year research was conducted in Antalya, Turkey, to determine tick species composition, seasonal abundance, and spatial distribution. The study was carried out in five districts (Aksu, Dosemealtı, Kepez, Konyaaltı, and Muratpasa) of Antalya Metropolitan Municipality area in Turkey, between May 2010 and May 2013, where 1393 tick specimens were collected from domestic and wild animals (cattle, goats, sheep, hedgehogs, tortoises, dogs, cats, chickens) and from the environment. The collected ticks were preserved in 70 % alcohol and then were identified. Five genus and eight hard and soft tick species were identified, including Argas persicus, Rhipicephalus annulatus, R. sanguineus, R. turanicus, Hyalomma aegyptium, H. marginatum, Haemaphysalis parva, and Dermacentor niveus. Rhipicephalus sanguineus, R. turanicus, and H. aegyptium were the most common tick species in Antalya city. Rhipicephalus turanicus and R. sanguineus were the most abundant tick species infesting dogs in the city. The hosts of H. aegyptium are primarily tortoises in Antalya. The results of this research will contribute to establishing appropriate measures to control tick infestations on animals and humans and their environment in the city of Antalya.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-015-4462-7DOI Listing
July 2015

Tick survey and detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in tick species from a non-endemic area, South Marmara region, Turkey.

Exp Appl Acarol 2013 Jun 11;60(2):253-61. Epub 2012 Dec 11.

Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey.

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an increasing health concern in Turkey since 2002. There were also some recent human cases from the South Marmara region of Turkey; thus, a tick survey was performed, and possible vector tick species for the CCHF virus were determined in the region. A total of 740 adult ticks were collected from infested livestock from five locations: Çanakkale-Biga, Bursa-Orhaneli, Bursa-Keles, Balıkesir and Bilecik. Total of 11 tick species from the genera Hyalomma, Rhipicephalus, Dermacentor, Ixodes and Haemaphysalis were identified. Rhipicephalus ticks were dominant in the region; the most frequently observed tick species was R. turanicus, (53.1 %), and only 15.4 % of the identified ticks were H. marginatum. The occurrence of H. rufipes infestation in the region fort he first time. A total of 73 pools of adult ticks were tested with both an antigen-detecting ELISA and RT real-time PCR (RT rt PCR). The presence of the CCHF virus was demonstrated in 9 (12.3 %) of the tested tick pools. Although seven of the tick pools were positive for the CCHF virus with both of the methods, one pool was positive only with RT rt PCR and the other pool was only positive with the ELISA. Positive results were obtained from ticks collected from cattle, sheep and goats from two locations, Bursa-Orhaneli and Bilecik. The CCHF virus was detected in R. turanicus (n = 3), R. bursa (n = 2), H. marginatum (n = 2) and D. marginatus (n = 2) ticks. The results of this study confirm the presence of the CCHF virus and present preliminary data on the vector tick species in the southern Marmara region of Turkey.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10493-012-9642-xDOI Listing
June 2013

Acaricidal activity of Origanum bilgeri P.H. Davis (Lamiaceae) essential oil and its major component, carvacrol against adults Rhipicephalus turanicus (Acari: Ixodidae).

Vet Parasitol 2013 Mar 14;193(1-3):316-9. Epub 2012 Nov 14.

Akdeniz University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, 07058 Antalya, Turkey.

The acaricidal activity of an essential oil obtained from aerial parts of Origanum bilgeri P.H. Davis (Lamiaceae), an endemic species in Turkey, and its major constituents, carvacrol was evaluated against unfed adults Rhipicephalus turanicus Pomerantzev (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from Kepez, Antalya. The composition of the essential oil was analyzed by GC/MS. The major compound identified in the oil was carvacrol (93.02%). Generally, tick mortalities to the O. bilgeri distillate and carvacrol increased with concentrations. O. bilgeri oil produced >83% mortality at 48h at a concentration of 0.8% and mortality was higher than 63% at a carvacrol concentration of 0.4%. Our results have shown that O. bilgeri essential oil and its major component, carvacrol, may have potential as acaricidal agents against R. turanicus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2012.11.010DOI Listing
March 2013

Acaricidal activity of the essential oils from three Lamiaceae plant species on Rhipicephalus turanicus Pom. (Acari: Ixodidae).

Parasitol Res 2012 Oct 12;111(4):1863-5. Epub 2012 May 12.

Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Akdeniz University, 07058, Antalya, Turkey.

Acaricidal effects of three Labiatae essential oils extracted from ariel parts of Thymus sipyleus Boiss. subsp. sipyleus, Mentha longifolia L., and Dorystoechas hastata Boiss. & Heldr. ex Bentham on 10-day-old Rhipicephalus turanicus Pom. (Acari: Ixodidae) larvae were evaluated by using the larval packet test bioassay. Serial dilutions of the three essential oils were tested from a starting concentration of 1-0.1% (1.0, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1% w/v). Results showed that all essential oils had very similar activity, producing complete mortality (100%) in all tested concentrations on 10-day-old R. turanicus tick larvae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-012-2939-1DOI Listing
October 2012

Distribution and seasonal activity of tick species on cattle in the West Aegean region of Turkey.

Exp Appl Acarol 2012 Feb 24;56(2):165-78. Epub 2011 Nov 24.

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Adnan Menderes University, Işıklı Mevki, Aydın, Turkey.

The aim of the present study was to determine the identity, seasonal activity and distribution of tick species of cattle in the West Aegean region of Turkey between June 2006 and May 2008. Nine villages within three provinces, viz. Manisa, Izmir and Aydin, were included in the study and a total of 75 animal barns were visited monthly for a period of 24 months and 443 cattle were examined for the presence of ticks. It was determined that 23% of cattle were infested with ticks. A total of 19,679 adult ticks were collected. The most abundant tick species was Hyalomma marginatum (33.5%) and H. excavatum (16.9%) in the study area. Seasonal appearance of the adult ticks varied among species. Adult ticks of the Hyalomma genus were present throughout the year, although in smaller numbers during the winter. Species of Rhipicephalus were detected in all seasons except autumn. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus was identified in July and August, Haemaphysalis parva was detected during the autumn. Ixodes ricinus and Dermacentor marginatus were identified during spring, autumn and winter. The study demonstrated the presence of I. ricinus, D. marginatus, Hyalomma rufipes and Hae. parva for the first time in the West Aegean region of Turkey.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10493-011-9502-0DOI Listing
February 2012

Erythromycin residue in honey from the Southern Marmara region of Turkey.

Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess 2008 Nov;25(11):1313-7

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Uludag University, Gorukle Kampusu, 16059 Bursa, Turkey.

Honey samples, collected from the Southern Marmara region of Turkey, were analysed for erythromycin residues by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode (LC-ESI-MS). Fifty samples, comprising chestnut, pine, linden and multi-flower honeys, were collected directly from hives and analyzed. The limit of detection and quantification were 6 and 20 ng g(-1), respectively, and recovery ranged from 85 to 89%. Four of the honey samples (8%) were found to be contaminated with erythromycin residues at concentrations ranging from 50 to 1776 ng g(-1). An erythromycin-fortified cake feeding assay was also performed in a defined hive to test the transfer of erythromycin residue to the honey matrix. In this test hive, the residue level in the honey, 3 months after dosing, was approximately 28 ng g(-1).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02652030802233472DOI Listing
November 2008

Comparative efficacy of spinosad with conventional acaricides against hard and soft tick populations from Antalya, Turkey.

Vet Parasitol 2009 Jul 22;163(1-2):101-4. Epub 2009 Apr 22.

Akdeniz University, Faculty of Arts and Science, Department of Biology, 07058 Antalya, Turkey.

The acaricidal efficacy of ceramic tiles treated at field application rates with either spinosad (Mozkill 120 SC, 0.01 g ai/m(2)), deltamethrin (Impotek Deltamethrin EW, 0.01 g ai/m(2)), permethrin+esbiothrin (Chrysamed, 0.1 g ai/m(2)), chlorpyrifos-methyl (Chlortoks EC 50, 0.2 g ai/m(2)) or a mixture of alpha-cypermethrin/tetramethrin/piperonyl butoxide (Ecorex Alfa SE, 0.01 g ai/m(2)), against larval Rhipicephalus turanicus and Argas persicus ticks was determined in laboratory bioassays. All ticks were initially exposed to treated tiles for 15 min then removed to non-treated containers and mortality evaluated for 15 min, 1 h, 6 h, and 24 h postexposure. Generally, A. persicus proved to be the most susceptible of the two species to all treatments. The alpha-cypermethrin/tetramethrin/piperonyl butoxide mixture was the quickest acting acaricide against larval A. persicus where 100% mortality was observed 15 min postexposure. For the rest of the treatments complete mortality was obtained at 1 h except for permethrin/esbiothrin which occurred at 6 h postexposure. Complete mortality of larval R. turanicus occurred to deltamethrin and spinosad at 1 h postexposure with all acaricides providing 100% control at 6 h except permethrin/esbiothrin which only achieved 92% control through the end of the study (i.e. 24 h). Our results showed that spinosad would be a useful addition in a tick control program as an alternative for pyrethroids and organic phosphorus acaricides against both tick species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2009.04.024DOI Listing
July 2009

Acaricidal effects of the essential oil of Origanum minutiflorum (Lamiaceae) against Rhipicephalus turanicus (Acari: Ixodidae).

Vet Parasitol 2009 Mar 13;160(3-4):359-61. Epub 2008 Nov 13.

Akdeniz University, Department of Biology, 07058 Antalya, Turkey.

The acaricidal effects of the volatile essential oil Origanum minutiflorum O. Schwarz & P.H. Davis (Lamiaceae) against adult Rhipicephalus turanicus was evaluated at a variety of concentrations and exposure times. Generally tick mortality increased with concentration and exposure. Ticks exposed to vapors from cotton wicks containing at least 10mul/L resulted in complete (100%) mortality at 120min. The major constituent of essential oil obtained from the plant material of O. minutiflorum was carvacrol.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2008.11.009DOI Listing
March 2009

Geographical distribution of ticks in Turkey.

Parasitol Res 2007 Sep;101 Suppl 2:S163-6

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Uludağ University, 16059, Görükle/Bursa, Turkey.

Turkey's tick fauna is composed of about 32 species in two families and ten genera in mammals, reptiles, and birds. The ticks of veterinary significance in the family Ixodidae comprise seven genera with 28 different species. Ixodes spp. are mostly seen in northern Turkey. It is likely that the high rainfall and the intensive forest in this area may contribute to this observation. To date, the following species have been found to be sporadically present: Amblyomma variegatum in Hatay province (border to Syria), Boophilus kohlsi in southeastern Turkey (border of Syria), Ornithodorus in Central and East Anatolia, and Otobius megnini in East Anatolia (Malatya Province). Ticks of the genera Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Boophilus, Dermacentor, Rhipicephalus, and Argas are widespread throughout Anatolia. Thus, their role in the epidemiology of important human and livestock diseases such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Lyme disease, and diseases caused by hemoparasites needs to be examined in greater detail.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-007-0694-5DOI Listing
September 2007

[Occurrence of Nosema bombycis (Naegeli, 1857) in silkworms in Turkey].

Turkiye Parazitol Derg 2007 ;31(1):72-4

Uludağ Universitesi, Veteriner Fakültesi, Parazitoloji Anabilim Dali, Bursa, Turkey.

Nosema bombycis (Naegeli, 1857) is the causative agent of the "Pebrine disease" in silkworms. N. bombycis spores were found in silkworm samples originating from the Hatay, Bursa and Bilecik provinces. Clinical signs were observed in the infected silkworm larvae. Because of the transovarial transmission risk, all the infected silkworm colonies were destroyed.
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November 2007

[Macrocheles sp. (Acarina: Macrochelidae) found on a bumble bee].

Turkiye Parazitol Derg 2006 ;30(3):217-9

Uludağ Universitesi, Veteriner Fakültesi, Parazitoloji Anabilim Dali, Bursa, Turkey.

A female arthropod was found on a bumble bee and was found to be an acaria belonging to the genus Macrocheles sp (Acarina: Macrochelidae). This is the first time that the parasitic acaria, which is found in many parts of the world, has been reported on bumble bees in Turkey.
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November 2007

Reduction of house-dust mite allergen concentrations in carpets by aluminium potassium sulfate dodecahydrate (alum).

Allergy Asthma Proc 2006 Sep-Oct;27(5):350-3

Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey.

Special tools and skilled labor are required to reduce house-dust mite allergens in carpets. The main house-dust mite allergen is Der p 1, a soluble protein found in high abundance in woolen carpets. Current chemical treatment options are either unsafe or ineffective in eradicating Der p 1. Here, we present an effective, safe, and easy application reagent to reduce the allergen levels in carpets. Sixty woolen carpets with Der p 1 concentrations >2 microg/g in fine dust were divided into three homogeneous groups of 20 carpets each, according to their allergen load. We tested alum dissolved in 60 mL of water at doses of 3, 6, and 9 g/m2 against Der p 1 in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The test side of the carpets was sprayed with the reagent. The control side was treated with the 60 mL of tap water. Dust particles were collected from a 1-m2 area on each carpet side 24 hours after treatment and were analyzed for Der p 1 content with a monoclonal ELISA. Alum reduced the Der p 1 concentrations by 48.6 +/- 6.2%, 78.8 +/- 7.2%, and 95.2 +/- 3.0% at 3, 6, and 9 g/m2 in the carpets, respectively. Moreover, there were no complaints registered by the residents against the alum applications. Alum, at 9 g/m2 (in a solution at 15%) in water, can be used for decreasing existing Der p 1 concentrations in woolen carpets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2500/aap.2006.27.2913DOI Listing
December 2006

Beneficial effect of lisinopril plus telmisartan in patients with type 2 diabetes, microalbuminuria and hypertension.

Diabetes Res Clin Pract 2006 Feb 19;71(2):210-9. Epub 2005 Aug 19.

Department of 2nd Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have favourable effects on hypertension and diabetic nephropathy, but persistent use may result in incomplete blockade of the renin-angiotensin system. Long-term effects of dual blockade using the ACE inhibitor lisinopril and the long-acting angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) telmisartan on blood pressure and albumin excretion rate (AER) were evaluated. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension (systolic blood pressure [SBP] >or=140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure [DBP] >or=90 mmHg) and microalbuminuria (AER 30-300 mg/24h) received 20mg of lisinopril or 80 mg of telmisartan once a day for 24 weeks. Patients were then randomised to continuing treatment with the respective monotherapy or with lisinopril plus telmisartan for a further 28 weeks. Significant (P<0.001) declines in SBP (11.1 mmHg versus 10.0 mmHg), DBP (5.6 mmHg versus 5.3 mmHg) and AER (98 mg/24 h versus 80 mg/24 h) were achieved with lisinopril (n=95) or telmisartan (n=97), respectively, after 24 weeks. Subsequent treatment with lisinopril plus telmisartan for 28 weeks resulted in further significant reductions (P<0.001) in SBP, DBP and AER compared with either monotherapy. All treatments were well tolerated. Lisinopril plus telmisartan thus provides superior blood pressure and AER control than either monotherapy. We conclude that use of dual blockade may provide a new approach to prevention of diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes, hypertension and microalbuminuria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.diabres.2005.06.010DOI Listing
February 2006