Publications by authors named "Leticia Bergamin Januario"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Working from home during the COVID-19 outbreak in Sweden: effects on 24-h time-use in office workers.

BMC Public Health 2021 03 17;21(1):528. Epub 2021 Mar 17.

Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered national recommendations encouraging people to work from home (WFH), but the possible impact of WFH on physical behaviors is unknown. This study aimed to determine the extent to which the 24-h allocation of time to different physical behaviors changes between days working at the office (WAO) and days WFH in office workers during the pandemic.

Methods: Data were collected on 27 office workers with full-time employment at a Swedish municipal division during the COVID-19 outbreak in May-July 2020. A thigh-worn accelerometer (Axivity) was used to assess physical behavior (sedentary, stand, move) during seven consecutive days. A diary was used to identify periods of work, leisure and sleep. 24-h compositions of sedentary, standing and moving behaviors during work and non-work time were examined using Compositional data analysis (CoDA), and differences between days WAO and days WFH were determined using repeated measures ANOVA.

Results: Days WFH were associated with more time spent sleeping relative to awake, and the effect size was large (F = 7.4; p = 0.01; η = 0.22). The increase (34 min) in sleep time during WFH occurred at the expense of a reduction in work and leisure time by 26 min and 7 min, respectively. Sedentary, standing and moving behaviors did not change markedly during days WFH compared to days WAO.

Conclusion: Days working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden were associated with longer duration of sleep than days working at the office. This behavioral change may be beneficial to health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-021-10582-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7968563PMC
March 2021

Work-Time Compositions of Physical Behaviors and Trajectories of Sick Leave Due to Musculoskeletal Pain.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 Feb 5;18(4). Epub 2021 Feb 5.

National Research Centre for the Working Environment, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.

We aimed to investigate the association between work-time compositions of physical behavior and sick leave trajectories due to musculoskeletal pain over one year. We conducted a secondary analysis using the data of 981 workers in a Danish prospective cohort (DPHACTO 2012-2014). At baseline, we assessed physical behaviors (sitting, standing, light physical activity (LIPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) at work and during leisure, using accelerometers. Over 1 year follow-up, workers reported sick-leave days due to musculoskeletal pain at 4-week intervals. Four distinct trajectories of sick leave were previously identified in this cohort ("no sick leave", "few days-increasing trajectory", "some days-decreasing trajectory", "some days-increasing trajectory"), and used as an outcome in multinomial regression models with work-time compositions as predictors, adjusted for compositions of behavior during leisure, age, sex, body mass index, and smoking habits. More time spent sitting relative to the other behaviors was negatively associated with the trajectory of few days-increasing sick leave ( = 0.004), while time in LIPA was positively associated with the trajectory of some days-increasing sick leave ( = 0.009). Standing and MVPA were not significantly associated with sick leave trajectories. In conclusion, work-time compositions with more sitting relative to the other behaviors had lower risk for an increasing trajectory of sick leave due to pain, while compositions with more LIPA had higher risk. This may have implications for prevention of pain-related sick leave in blue-collar workers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041508DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7915038PMC
February 2021

Combined Effects of Physical Behavior Compositions and Psychosocial Resources on Perceived Exertion Among Eldercare Workers.

Ann Work Expo Health 2020 11;64(9):923-935

Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.

Objectives: High perceived physical exertion is common in eldercare workers and a strong predictor for impaired health. However, little is known on how physical behaviors at work associate with physical exertion in this group. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which the composition of physical behaviors at work is associated with perceived physical exertion in nursing home eldercare workers, and the extent to which these associations are modified by psychosocial resources.

Methods: Our population consisted of 399 female eldercare workers from 126 wards in 20 different nursing homes. We evaluated time spent in physical behaviors at work [sitting, standing still, light activities (LAs), and moderate to vigorous activities (MVAs)] using triaxial accelerometers worn, on average, for three working days. We accounted for inherent codependency between the behaviors using compositional data analysis. We used multilevel linear mixed regression models to determine associations between the behaviors and perceived exertion, measured on a numeric rating scale (0-10), and included interactions between each behavior and psychosocial resources (influence at work, social support, and quality of leadership) to determine a possible moderating effect of resources. Regression results were illustrated using isotemporal substitution.

Results: Sitting was negatively (β: -0.64; P < 0.01) while MVA was positively (β: 0.95; P = 0.02) associated with perceived exertion. According to isotemporal substitution, replacing 30 min of MVA by sitting would, for an average worker, be associated with a decrease in physical exertion by -0.14 on the 0-10 scale. Job resources marginally moderated the association between LA and exertion. Thus, among workers with low influence and low social support, we found a positive association between LA and exertion, while that was not found for workers with medium or high influence and support (interactions for influence and support: P = 0.08 and P = 0.10).

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that reallocating time from MVA to sitting can mitigate perceived physical exertion in eldercare workers. More time in LA increased physical exertion only for workers with low psychosocial resources, supporting a positive effect of a better psychosocial work environment in elderly care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annweh/wxaa079DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7751016PMC
November 2020

Does sEMG normalization change results on sex differences in the activation of the shoulder girdle muscles during a simulated work task?

Appl Ergon 2020 May 10;85:103044. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Laboratory of Clinical and Occupational Kinesiology (LACO), Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luís, km 235, SP-310, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

The aim was to investigate if the method of normalizing surface electromyography (sEMG) can change results on sex differences in the muscular activation of the shoulder girdle muscles during a simulated work task. sEMG was recorded in 36 asymptomatic participants (17 females, 19 males) from four parts of trapezius and from serratus anterior muscles during a simulated work task. Four normalization methods, one involving maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) and three involving submaximal voluntary contractions were applied. Sex differences in absolute and normalized amplitude of sEMG were analyzed. The normalization method had a significant influence on the observed sex differences. Females only showed higher sEMG amplitude than males when the sEMGs were normalized to MVC and to a submaximal contraction based on 20% of MVC for the upper trapezius (acromial fibers). Researchers and practitioners should be aware of the impact of the sEMG normalization method in sex differences investigation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2020.103044DOI Listing
May 2020

Association between Psychosocial Working Conditions and Perceived Physical Exertion among Eldercare Workers: A Cross-Sectional Multilevel Analysis of Nursing Homes, Wards and Workers.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2019 09 26;16(19). Epub 2019 Sep 26.

Department of Occupational Health Sciences and Psychology, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Gävle, Kungsbäcksvägen 47, 801 76 Gävle, Sweden.

This cross-sectional multilevel study aims at investigating the associations between psychosocial working conditions of different workplace levels and perceived physical exertion among eldercare workers. Data were obtained from the 'Danish Observational Study of Eldercare work and musculoskeletal disorderS' (DOSES) study, including 536 eldercare workers, nested in 126 wards and 20 nursing homes. Psychosocial working conditions were measured by the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). The physical workload was measured with a self-administered scale (0-10) rating perceived physical exertion. Multilevel linear mixed models were used to determine associations of psychosocial conditions between nursing homes, wards, and workers with physical exertion. Most of the variance in the perceived physical exertion was explained by differences between workers (83%), but some variance was explained by wards (11%) and nursing homes (6%). Workers employed in nursing homes with low influence ( = 0.01) and poor leadership ( = 0.02), and in wards with high quantitative demands ( = 0.03), high work pace ( < 0.001), and low justice ( = 0.01) were at increased risk of reporting higher physical exertion. The strongest associations were found for low influence, low quality of leadership, and high work pace at nursing homes and ward levels. In conclusion, improving specific psychosocial working conditions at nursing home and ward levels may be of particular importance to reduce excessive physical workload in eldercare workers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193610DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6801705PMC
September 2019

Are there sex differences in muscle coordination of the upper girdle during a sustained motor task?

J Electromyogr Kinesiol 2019 Apr 16;45:1-10. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Laboratory for Ergonomics and Work-related Disorders, Sport Sciences, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7 D-3, 9220 Aalborg East, Denmark.

Purpose: The higher prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among women compared with men could be explained by sex-gender differences related to biological and physiological processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate sex differences in motor coordination during a sustained and repetitive motor task.

Methods: Seventeen healthy females and 21 healthy males participated. The surface electromyography (sEMG) of the trapezius portions and serratus anterior were recorded. Root mean square (RMS) values were computed to assess the level of muscle activity. The standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV) were computed as metrics of size of variability. The normalized mutual information (NMI) values were calculated as index of functional connectivity between muscles pairs.

Results: Females had higher normalized RMS values for the upper trapezius (acromial fibers) and serratus anterior muscles compared with males. RMS decreased, SD and CV increased while NMI decreased for almost all muscle pairs over time.

Conclusion: The present work showed some signs of sex differences in muscle coordination of the shoulder girdle during a sustained motor task, performed with the upper limb positioned below of the shoulder level.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jelekin.2019.01.003DOI Listing
April 2019

Surface electromyography in inspiratory muscles in adults and elderly individuals: A systematic review.

J Electromyogr Kinesiol 2019 Feb 11;44:139-155. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Department of Physical Therapy, Biological and Health Sciences Center, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos/SP, Brazil; Spirometry and Respiratory Physiotherapy Laboratory (LEFiR) at UFSCar, São Carlos/SP, Brazil.

Introduction: Electromyography (EMG) helps to evaluate disorders and pulmonary behavior, as impairments in respiratory muscle function are associated with the development of diseases. There is a wide range of methods and protocols used to record and analyze EMG obtained from respiratory muscles, demonstrating a lack of standardization.

Objective: To identify the most common procedures used to record surface EMG (sEMG) of inspiratory muscles in adults and elderly individuals through a systematic review (primary), and to evaluate the quality of the report presented by the studies (secondary).

Method: Studies published from January 1995 until June 2018 were searched for in the Web of Science, PubMed, LILACS, EBSCO and Embase databases. Only studies evaluating sEMG of inspiratory muscles were included.

Results: The electronic search retrieved a total of 6697 titles and 92 of them were included. A great variability on the methods applied to both recording and processing/analyzing data was found. Therefore, the synthesis of practical/clinical evidence to support immediate recommendations was impaired. In general, the descriptions presented by the studies are poor.

Conclusion: The most common procedures used for sEMG were identified. Methodological studies with objective comparisons were fundamental for improving standardization, given the impossibility of recommendations from this review.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jelekin.2019.01.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Adding Handles to Optimize Manual Box Handling.

Biomed Res Int 2018 18;2018:7315217. Epub 2018 Nov 18.

Laboratory of Clinical and Occupational Kinesiology (LACO), Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil.

The risk factors for developing musculoskeletal disorders in material handling tasks are well known. Among strategies for controlling risks, modifying boxes by adding handles is suggested. However, there are no clear recommendations regarding box modification as an approach to improve musculoskeletal health. In this study, we investigated the main literature databases to identify effects of box modification on reducing physical load. Electronic and manual searches were performed to identify studies that evaluated effects of boxes handles on physical exposure during handling tasks. The included studies were very heterogeneous (methods of assessment, types of handles used, and methodological quality), jeopardizing synthesis of evidence. Despite the mentioned limitations, we could suggest some features that could improve manual handling in practical settings, like the use of cylindrical handles forms with intermediate diameters (between 31 and 51 mm) and 30° inclination. Those characteristics demonstrated positive results on physical exposure. Regular cut-outs were indicated as a beneficial approach when boxes are handled in high surfaces. When handling occurs in medium heights or in the floor level, handles positioned on the top of the box might bring better results. Efforts to standardize methods are important to support both objective and subjective assessment of box handle design, as well to improve the internal validity of studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/7315217DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276528PMC
April 2019

Comparison of muscle activity from upper trapezius and wrist extensors between dominant and non-dominant upper limbs during computer-based tasks.

Work 2018 ;61(2):295-301

Laboratory of Clinical and Occupational Kinesiology (LACO), Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos - UFSCar, São Carlos - SP, Brazil.

Background: Sustained low-level muscle activity occurring during computer-based tasks is associated with the development of WMSDs (work-related musculoskeletal disorders) and this biomechanical exposure may be different between limbs.

Objective: To compare muscle activity from dominant and non-dominant upper trapezius (UT) and wrist extensors (WE) during computer-based tasks in real work settings.

Methods: Forty-five workers were monitored during two hours while performing their usual administrative tasks. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was recorded from UT and WE muscles in both sides. Rest and general exposure variables were calculated.

Results: The 50th percentile demonstrated little muscle activity demand, for both dominant and non-dominant UT and no difference between sides was observed. The dominant WE muscles had lower measures of rest and higher muscle activity when compared with the non-dominant side.

Conclusions: Differences in sEMG between upper limbs were only found in WE muscles, probably due to the use of the mouse. The overall low-level muscle activity suggests a constant activation of the same motor units for the entire data-collection period, which can be considered harmful for musculoskeletal health.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/WOR-182800DOI Listing
December 2018

Normalization of the trapezius sEMG signal - a reliability study on women with and without neck-shoulder pain.

Braz J Phys Ther 2018 Mar - Apr;22(2):110-119. Epub 2017 Sep 29.

Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar), São Carlos, SP, Brazil. Electronic address:

Objective: To evaluate within- and between-days reliability of two normalization methods of surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings of the trapezius muscle.

Methods: Nineteen women were allocated into 2 groups (healthy and with neck-shoulder pain). The sEMG was recorded in two sessions with 7 days in between sessions. The four portions of the trapezius muscle (the clavicular and acromial fibers of the upper trapezius, the middle and the lower trapezius) were evaluated during maximal and submaximal isometric voluntary contractions. The within- and between-days reliability of both maximal and submaximal contractions were assessed through Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC was used for within-day analyses of both maximal and submaximal contractions, and for between-days analyses of maximal contractions while ICC was used for between-days analyses of submaximal contractions), Coefficient of Variation, Standard Error of Measurement, and Bland-Altman analysis.

Results: In general, submaximal contractions presented higher within-day reliability, with higher ICC values (e.g., middle trapezius - mean of 0.97), smaller Coefficient of Variation and Standard Error of Measurement ranges compared to maximal contractions (ICC values, e.g. for middle trapezius - mean of 0.94) in both groups. The same pattern was observed for between-days analyses, with submaximal contractions presenting higher ICC values (e.g., middle trapezius - mean of 0.84), smaller Coefficient of Variation and Standard Error of Measurement ranges than maximal contractions (ICC values, e.g. for middle trapezius - mean of 0.73) in both groups.

Conclusion: Submaximal contractions are recommended for normalization procedures of trapezius sEMG, in both subjects with neck-shoulder pain and healthy individuals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjpt.2017.09.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5883997PMC
November 2018

Can exposure variation be promoted in the shoulder girdle muscles by modifying work pace and inserting pauses during simulated assembly work?

Appl Ergon 2018 Jan 4;66:151-160. Epub 2017 Sep 4.

Laboratory of Clinical and Occupational Kinesiology (LACO), Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil.

This study investigated the acute effects of changing the work pace and implementing two pause types during an assembly task. Eighteen healthy women performed a simulated task in four different conditions: 1) slow or 2) fast work pace with 3) passive or 4) active pauses every two minutes. The root mean square (RMS) and exposure variation analysis (EVA) from the trapezius and serratus anterior muscles, as well as the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) from the neck-shoulder region, were observed. Decreased RMS and RPE as well as more variable muscle activity (EVA) were observed in the slow work pace compared with the fast one. The pause types had a limited effect, but active pauses resulted in increased RMS of the clavicular trapezius. The findings revealed the importance of work pace in the reduction of perceived exertion and promotion of variation in muscle activation during assembly tasks. However, the pause types had no important effect on the evaluated outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2017.08.011DOI Listing
January 2018

The coordination of shoulder girdle muscles during repetitive arm movements at either slow or fast pace among women with or without neck-shoulder pain.

Hum Mov Sci 2017 Oct 11;55:287-295. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Laboratory for Ergonomics and Work-related Disorders, Physical Activity and Human Performance Group - SMI, Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, Aalborg East, Denmark.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the coordination of the shoulder girdle muscles among subjects with or without neck-shoulder pain performing repetitive arm movement at either a slow or fast pace.

Methods: Thirty female adults were allocated to one of two groups-healthy controls or cases with neck-shoulder pain. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals from the clavicular, acromial, middle and lower trapezius portions and the serratus anterior muscles were recorded during a task performed for 20min at a slow pace and 20min at a fast pace. The root mean square (RMS), relative rest time (RRT) and normalised mutual information (NMI, an index of functional connectivity between two muscles in a pair) were computed.

Results: No significant differences on RMS, RRT and NMI were found between groups. For both groups, the fast movement pace resulted in increased levels of RMS, lower degrees of RRT and higher NMI compared to the slow pace. No interaction between group and movement pace was found.

Conclusions: This study highlights the change in sEMG activity of muscles to meet the demands of performing a task at fast movement pace. The fast pace imposed a higher muscle demand evidenced by increased sEMG amplitude, low degree of muscle rest and increased functional connectivity for subjects in both the case and control groups. No indication of impaired sEMG activity was found in individuals with neck-shoulder pain.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2017.09.002DOI Listing
October 2017

Effects of active pause pattern of surface electromyographic activity among subjects performing monotonous tasks: A systematic review.

J Electromyogr Kinesiol 2016 Oct 25;30:196-208. Epub 2016 Jul 25.

Laboratory of Clinical and Occupational Kinesiology (LACO), Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Active pauses have shown potentially beneficial effects to increase the variability of the electrical activation pattern of muscles. However, there is a lack of consensus as to how to design and implement those pauses and the processing methods of surface electromyography (EMG) data when evaluating low-level monotonous tasks. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the evidences regarding the way which active pauses have been applied, and the methods used to investigate the related EMG changes. PubMed-MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, Lilacs, Ebsco, and Scopus databases were searched. Two authors independently extracted data from the primary studies. The methodological quality was assessed using a list from van der Windt et al. (2000), and the level of evidence was synthesized through GRADE. The ISEK guideline for reporting EMG data was also applied as a checklist. Fifteen studies were included - 14 with high methodological quality. In general, active pauses were able to change the level of EMG activity in monotonous tasks. The level of evidence through GRADE was very low for all EMG processing methods, except RMS which was low. A vast heterogeneity concerning the methods applied to analyze EMG data contributed to decrease the quality of evidence synthesis, and the findings need to be carefully considered. The GRADE approach and the ISEK guideline contributed to identify important flaws in the literature. Future studies investigating active pauses in longitudinal studies and following the standard for recording and reporting EMG data care are warranted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jelekin.2016.07.009DOI Listing
October 2016

Need for recovery assessment among nursing professionals and call center operators.

Work 2012 ;41 Suppl 1:4838-42

Department of Physical Therapy, Federal University of São Carlos, Washington Luís Road, Km 235, SP 310, CEP 13565-905 São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil.

The present study descriptively compares the need for recovery (NFR) among 128 nursing professionals (nurses) and 223 call center operators according cutoff points in the literature (45 and 50) and by means of statistical tests, and verifies the association between NFR scores and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms. NFR was evaluated with the Need for Recovery Scale and musculoskeletal symptoms were evaluated with the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. At a 45 point cutoff, 22% of the call-center workers and 33% of the nurses were classified as fatigued; at a 50 point cutoff, 13% of the call center operators and 27% of the nurses were classified as fatigued. The nurses had higher fatigue levels than the call center workers (p=0.015). Significant correlations were found between NFR scores and musculoskeletal symptoms reported during the previous 12 months (r=0.299, p<0.001) and 7 days (r=0.314, p<0.001). Regarding cutoff points and statistical tests, the NFR scale identified higher fatigue levels among the nurses and was demonstrated to be a useful tool for evaluating worker well-being.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/WOR-2012-0773-4838DOI Listing
April 2014