Publications by authors named "Leticia Arellano-Morales"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A path model of racial/ethnic discrimination and cardiovascular disease risk factors among college students of color.

J Am Coll Health 2020 Nov 5:1-5. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Department of Psychology, University of La Verne, La Verne, California, USA.

Objective: Racial/ethnic minorities experience disproportionately greater risk to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). This study examined racial/ethnic discrimination-as a psychosocial stressor-in a path model and its associations with CVD health risk factors among undergraduate students of color (SoC). The sample included 404 SoC whose ages ranged from 18 to 54 ( = 21.82,  = 5.26; 65% female) from a Hispanic Serving Institution in Southern California. Participants responded to measures assessing the following traditional and non-traditional CVD indicators: depression, anxiety, and body mass index (BMI). A path model was configured with paths corresponding from racial/ethnic discrimination to BMI, depression, and anxiety symptoms, controlling for gender and age. After accounting for covariates, findings revealed greater levels of racial/ethnic discrimination was uniquely associated with greater BMI, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Findings demonstrate racial/ethnic discrimination is associated with CVD health risk factors among SoC. Data highlight the importance and magnitude of adverse psychosocial experiences on CVD health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2020.1841772DOI Listing
November 2020

Prevalence and Correlates of Perceived Ethnic Discrimination in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

J Lat Psychol 2015 Aug 8;3(3):160-176. Epub 2015 Jun 8.

Department of Psychology, St John's University.

Empirical studies examining perceived ethnic discrimination in Latinos of diverse background groups are limited. This study examined prevalence and correlates of discrimination in a diverse sample of U.S. Latinos (N=5,291) from the multi-site Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) and HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study. The sample permitted an examination of differences across seven groups (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South American, and Other/Multiple Background). Most participants (79.5%) reported lifetime discrimination exposure and prevalence rates ranged from 64.9% to 98% across groups. Structural Equation Models (SEM) indicated that after adjusting for sociodemographic covariates most group differences in reports of discrimination were eliminated. However, Cubans reported the lowest levels of discrimination, overall among all groups. Furthermore, regional effects were more important than group effects. Participants from Chicago reported the highest levels of discrimination in comparison to other regions. Group differences among Latinos appear to be primarily a function of sociodemographic differences in education, income, and acculturation. In addition, differences in exposure to discrimination may be tied to variables associated with both immigration patterns and integration to U.S. culture. Results highlight the importance of considering historical context and the intersection of discrimination and immigration when evaluating the mental health of Latinos.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/lat0000040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4610197PMC
August 2015

Development and validation of the African American Women's Shifting Scale (AAWSS).

Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol 2016 Jan 6;22(1):11-25. Epub 2015 Apr 6.

Office of Diversity & Inclusion.

Objective: The purpose of this research was to develop and validate an instrument to measure shifting or self-altering strategies among African American women.

Method: A 13-item instrument was developed to measure aspects of shifting phenomena based on the empirical literature, feedback from focus groups, and cultural experts. The initial validation study, using principal axis analysis, was conducted with a national sample of 318 African American women. A second independent national sample of 190 African American women provided data for a confirmatory factor analysis.

Results: Results indicated that the inventory was composed of the following 3 factors: Strong Black Woman, Awareness of Shifting Behavior, and Sensitivity to the Perceptions of Blacks.

Conclusions: A structural model was developed based on the Multicultural Assessment-Intervention Process (MAIP) framework that allowed for the exploration of the shifting construct. Implications for future research are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000039DOI Listing
January 2016

Acculturation among Latino primary caregivers and physician communication: receipt of advice regarding healthy lifestyle behaviors.

J Community Health 2013 Feb;38(1):113-9

Department of Psychology, University of La Verne, La Verne, CA 91750, USA.

The present study was part of a larger randomized controlled childhood obesity prevention trial based in 11 public recreation centers. The primary aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-level intervention to prevent the onset of overweight and obesity among children (5-8 years of age). However, the purpose of the current study was to identify sociodemographic variables, such as acculturation, that were associated with receipt of physician advice among Latino primary caregivers. Participants included 221 Latino primary caregivers and their children from San Diego, CA. Cross-sectional baseline data suggested that Latino children with private insurance were more likely to receive physician advice regarding their eating habits. Conversely, primary caregivers between the ages of 30-39 were less likely to receive physician advice regarding their child's eating habits. Current findings highlight the continued need to improve preventive efforts and reduce health disparities among a vulnerable population, such as Latinos.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10900-012-9588-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3779273PMC
February 2013