Publications by authors named "Leslie S Emery"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Population sequencing data reveal a compendium of mutational processes in the human germ line.

Science 2021 08 12;373(6558):1030-1035. Epub 2021 Aug 12.

Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

Biological mechanisms underlying human germline mutations remain largely unknown. We statistically decompose variation in the rate and spectra of mutations along the genome using volume-regularized nonnegative matrix factorization. The analysis of a sequencing dataset (TOPMed) reveals nine processes that explain the variation in mutation properties between loci. We provide a biological interpretation for seven of these processes. We associate one process with bulky DNA lesions that are resolved asymmetrically with respect to transcription and replication. Two processes track direction of replication fork and replication timing, respectively. We identify a mutagenic effect of active demethylation primarily acting in regulatory regions and a mutagenic effect of long interspersed nuclear elements. We localize a mutagenic process specific to oocytes from population sequencing data. This process appears transcriptionally asymmetric.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aba7408DOI Listing
August 2021

A System for Phenotype Harmonization in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program.

Am J Epidemiol 2021 10;190(10):1977-1992

Genotype-phenotype association studies often combine phenotype data from multiple studies to increase statistical power. Harmonization of the data usually requires substantial effort due to heterogeneity in phenotype definitions, study design, data collection procedures, and data-set organization. Here we describe a centralized system for phenotype harmonization that includes input from phenotype domain and study experts, quality control, documentation, reproducible results, and data-sharing mechanisms. This system was developed for the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program, which is generating genomic and other -omics data for more than 80 studies with extensive phenotype data. To date, 63 phenotypes have been harmonized across thousands of participants (recruited in 1948-2012) from up to 17 studies per phenotype. Here we discuss challenges in this undertaking and how they were addressed. The harmonized phenotype data and associated documentation have been submitted to National Institutes of Health data repositories for controlled access by the scientific community. We also provide materials to facilitate future harmonization efforts by the community, which include 1) the software code used to generate the 63 harmonized phenotypes, enabling others to reproduce, modify, or extend these harmonizations to additional studies, and 2) the results of labeling thousands of phenotype variables with controlled vocabulary terms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwab115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8485147PMC
October 2021

Chromosome Xq23 is associated with lower atherogenic lipid concentrations and favorable cardiometabolic indices.

Nat Commun 2021 04 12;12(1):2182. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Division of Cardiology, George Washington University School of Medicine and Healthcare Sciences, Washington, DC, USA.

Autosomal genetic analyses of blood lipids have yielded key insights for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, X chromosome genetic variation is understudied for blood lipids in large sample sizes. We now analyze genetic and blood lipid data in a high-coverage whole X chromosome sequencing study of 65,322 multi-ancestry participants and perform replication among 456,893 European participants. Common alleles on chromosome Xq23 are strongly associated with reduced total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides (min P = 8.5 × 10), with similar effects for males and females. Chromosome Xq23 lipid-lowering alleles are associated with reduced odds for CHD among 42,545 cases and 591,247 controls (P = 1.7 × 10), and reduced odds for diabetes mellitus type 2 among 54,095 cases and 573,885 controls (P = 1.4 × 10). Although we observe an association with increased BMI, waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI is reduced, bioimpedance analyses indicate increased gluteofemoral fat, and abdominal MRI analyses indicate reduced visceral adiposity. Co-localization analyses strongly correlate increased CHRDL1 gene expression, particularly in adipose tissue, with reduced concentrations of blood lipids.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22339-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8042019PMC
April 2021

Sequencing of 53,831 diverse genomes from the NHLBI TOPMed Program.

Nature 2021 02 10;590(7845):290-299. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA.

The Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) programme seeks to elucidate the genetic architecture and biology of heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders, with the ultimate goal of improving diagnosis, treatment and prevention of these diseases. The initial phases of the programme focused on whole-genome sequencing of individuals with rich phenotypic data and diverse backgrounds. Here we describe the TOPMed goals and design as well as the available resources and early insights obtained from the sequence data. The resources include a variant browser, a genotype imputation server, and genomic and phenotypic data that are available through dbGaP (Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes). In the first 53,831 TOPMed samples, we detected more than 400 million single-nucleotide and insertion or deletion variants after alignment with the reference genome. Additional previously undescribed variants were detected through assembly of unmapped reads and customized analysis in highly variable loci. Among the more than 400 million detected variants, 97% have frequencies of less than 1% and 46% are singletons that are present in only one individual (53% among unrelated individuals). These rare variants provide insights into mutational processes and recent human evolutionary history. The extensive catalogue of genetic variation in TOPMed studies provides unique opportunities for exploring the contributions of rare and noncoding sequence variants to phenotypic variation. Furthermore, combining TOPMed haplotypes with modern imputation methods improves the power and reach of genome-wide association studies to include variants down to a frequency of approximately 0.01%.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03205-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7875770PMC
February 2021

Associations of Mitochondrial and Nuclear Mitochondrial Variants and Genes with Seven Metabolic Traits.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 01 27;104(1):112-138. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

School of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, and Program for Personalized and Genomic Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Mitochondria (MT), the major site of cellular energy production, are under dual genetic control by 37 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes and numerous nuclear genes (MT-nDNA). In the CHARGEmtDNA+ Consortium, we studied genetic associations of mtDNA and MT-nDNA associations with body mass index (BMI), waist-hip-ratio (WHR), glucose, insulin, HOMA-B, HOMA-IR, and HbA1c. This 45-cohort collaboration comprised 70,775 (insulin) to 170,202 (BMI) pan-ancestry individuals. Validation and imputation of mtDNA variants was followed by single-variant and gene-based association testing. We report two significant common variants, one in MT-ATP6 associated (p ≤ 5E-04) with WHR and one in the D-loop with glucose. Five rare variants in MT-ATP6, MT-ND5, and MT-ND6 associated with BMI, WHR, or insulin. Gene-based meta-analysis identified MT-ND3 associated with BMI (p ≤ 1E-03). We considered 2,282 MT-nDNA candidate gene associations compiled from online summary results for our traits (20 unique studies with 31 dataset consortia's genome-wide associations [GWASs]). Of these, 109 genes associated (p ≤ 1E-06) with at least 1 of our 7 traits. We assessed regulatory features of variants in the 109 genes, cis- and trans-gene expression regulation, and performed enrichment and protein-protein interactions analyses. Of the identified mtDNA and MT-nDNA genes, 79 associated with adipose measures, 49 with glucose/insulin, 13 with risk for type 2 diabetes, and 18 with cardiovascular disease, indicating for pleiotropic effects with health implications. Additionally, 21 genes related to cholesterol, suggesting additional important roles for the genes identified. Our results suggest that mtDNA and MT-nDNA genes and variants reported make important contributions to glucose and insulin metabolism, adipocyte regulation, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323610PMC
January 2019

Genetic architecture of lipid traits in the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.

Lipids Health Dis 2017 Oct 12;16(1):200. Epub 2017 Oct 12.

Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.

Background: Despite ethnic disparities in lipid profiles, there are few genome-wide association studies investigating genetic variation of lipids in non-European ancestry populations. In this study, we present findings from genetic association analyses for total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), and triglycerides in a large Hispanic/Latino cohort in the U.S., the Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

Methods: We estimated a heritability of approximately 20% for each lipid trait, similar to previous estimates in Europeans. To search for novel lipid loci, we performed conditional association analysis in which the statistical model was adjusted for previously reported SNPs associated with any of the four lipid traits. SNPs that remained genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10) after conditioning on known loci were evaluated for replication.

Results: We identified eight potentially novel lipid signals with minor allele frequencies <1%, none of which replicated. We tested previously reported SNP-trait associations for generalization to Hispanics/Latinos via a statistical framework. The generalization analysis revealed that approximately 50% of previously established lipid variants generalize to HCHS/SOL based on directional FDR r-value < 0.05. Some failures to generalize were due to lack of power.

Conclusions: These results demonstrate that many loci associated with lipid levels are shared across populations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12944-017-0591-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5639746PMC
October 2017

Genome-Wide Association Study of Heavy Smoking and Daily/Nondaily Smoking in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

Nicotine Tob Res 2018 03;20(4):448-457

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Introduction: Genetic variants associated with nicotine dependence have previously been identified, primarily in European-ancestry populations. No genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been reported for smoking behaviors in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States and Latin America, who are of mixed ancestry with European, African, and American Indigenous components.

Methods: We examined genetic associations with smoking behaviors in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) (N = 12 741 with smoking data, 5119 ever-smokers), using ~2.3 million genotyped variants imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project phase 3. Mixed logistic regression models accounted for population structure, sampling, relatedness, sex, and age.

Results: The known region of CHRNA5, which encodes the α5 cholinergic nicotinic receptor subunit, was associated with heavy smoking at genome-wide significance (p ≤ 5 × 10-8) in a comparison of 1929 ever-smokers reporting cigarettes per day (CPD) > 10 versus 3156 reporting CPD ≤ 10. The functional variant rs16969968 in CHRNA5 had a p value of 2.20 × 10-7 and odds ratio (OR) of 1.32 for the minor allele (A); its minor allele frequency was 0.22 overall and similar across Hispanic/Latino background groups (Central American = 0.17; South American = 0.19; Mexican = 0.18; Puerto Rican = 0.22; Cuban = 0.29; Dominican = 0.19). CHRNA4 on chromosome 20 attained p < 10-4, supporting prior findings in non-Hispanics. For nondaily smoking, which is prevalent in Hispanic/Latino smokers, compared to daily smoking, loci on chromosomes 2 and 4 achieved genome-wide significance; replication attempts were limited by small Hispanic/Latino sample sizes.

Conclusions: Associations of nicotinic receptor gene variants with smoking, first reported in non-Hispanic European-ancestry populations, generalized to Hispanics/Latinos despite different patterns of smoking behavior.

Implications: We conducted the first large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) of smoking behavior in a US Hispanic/Latino cohort, and the first GWAS of daily/nondaily smoking in any population. Results show that the region of the nicotinic receptor subunit gene CHRNA5, which in non-Hispanic European-ancestry smokers has been associated with heavy smoking as well as cessation and treatment efficacy, is also significantly associated with heavy smoking in this Hispanic/Latino cohort. The results are an important addition to understanding the impact of genetic variants in understudied Hispanic/Latino smokers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntx107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5896462PMC
March 2018

Genetic variation near IRS1 is associated with adiposity and a favorable metabolic profile in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos.

Obesity (Silver Spring) 2016 11 24;24(11):2407-2413. Epub 2016 Sep 24.

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.

Objective: Associations of IRS1 genetic variation with adiposity and metabolic profile in U.S. Hispanic/Latino individuals of diverse backgrounds were examined.

Methods: Previously genome-wide association study-identified IRS1 variants (rs2943650, rs2972146, rs2943641, and rs2943634) as related to body fat percentage (BF%) and multiple metabolic traits were tested among up to 12,730 adults (5,232 men; 7,515 women) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

Results: The C-allele (frequency = 26%) of rs2943650 was significantly associated with higher BF% overall (β = 0.34 ± 0.11% per allele; P = 0.002) and in women (β = 0.41 ± 0.14% per C-allele; P = 0.003), but not in men (β = 0.28 ± 0.18% per C-allele; P = 0.11), though there was no significant sex difference. Using the inverse normal-transformed data to compare effect sizes, it was found that the association with BF% was stronger in Hispanic/Latino women than that previously reported in European women (β = 0.054 ± 0.018SD vs. β = 0.008 ± 0.011SD per C-allele; P = 0.03). The BF%-increasing allele of rs2943650 was significantly associated with lower levels of fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, hemoglobin A1c, and triglycerides and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: This study confirmed and extended previous findings of IRS1 variation associated with increased adiposity but a favorable metabolic profile in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos, with a relatively stronger genetic effect on BF% in Hispanic/Latino women compared with European women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.21624DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5093062PMC
November 2016

Estimates of continental ancestry vary widely among individuals with the same mtDNA haplogroup.

Am J Hum Genet 2015 Feb 22;96(2):183-93. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address:

The association between a geographical region and an mtDNA haplogroup(s) has provided the basis for using mtDNA haplogroups to infer an individual's place of origin and genetic ancestry. Although it is well known that ancestry inferences using mtDNA haplogroups and those using genome-wide markers are frequently discrepant, little empirical information exists on the magnitude and scope of such discrepancies between multiple mtDNA haplogroups and worldwide populations. We compared genetic-ancestry inferences made by mtDNA-haplogroup membership to those made by autosomal SNPs in ∼940 samples of the Human Genome Diversity Panel and recently admixed populations from the 1000 Genomes Project. Continental-ancestry proportions often varied widely among individuals sharing the same mtDNA haplogroup. For only half of mtDNA haplogroups did the highest average continental-ancestry proportion match the highest continental-ancestry proportion of a majority of individuals with that haplogroup. Prediction of an individual's mtDNA haplogroup from his or her continental-ancestry proportions was often incorrect. Collectively, these results indicate that for most individuals in the worldwide populations sampled, mtDNA-haplogroup membership provides limited information about either continental ancestry or continental region of origin.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2014.12.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4320259PMC
February 2015

Estimators of the human effective sex ratio detect sex biases on different timescales.

Am J Hum Genet 2010 Dec 25;87(6):848-56. Epub 2010 Nov 25.

Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195, USA.

Determining historical sex ratios throughout human evolution can provide insight into patterns of genomic variation, the structure and composition of ancient populations, and the cultural factors that influence the sex ratio (e.g., sex-specific migration rates). Although numerous studies have suggested that unequal sex ratios have existed in human evolutionary history, a coherent picture of sex-biased processes has yet to emerge. For example, two recent studies compared human X chromosome to autosomal variation to make inferences about historical sex ratios but reached seemingly contradictory conclusions, with one study finding evidence for a male bias and the other study identifying a female bias. Here, we show that a large part of this discrepancy can be explained by methodological differences. Specifically, through reanalysis of empirical data, derivation of explicit analytical formulae, and extensive simulations we demonstrate that two estimators of the effective sex ratio based on population structure and nucleotide diversity preferentially detect biases that have occurred on different timescales. Our results clarify apparently contradictory evidence on the role of sex-biased processes in human evolutionary history and show that extant patterns of human genomic variation are consistent with both a recent male bias and an earlier, persistent female bias.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2010.10.021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2997380PMC
December 2010
-->