Publications by authors named "Leslie Lange"

219 Publications

Whole-genome sequencing in diverse subjects identifies genetic correlates of leukocyte traits: The NHLBI TOPMed program.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 Oct 27;108(10):1836-1851. Epub 2021 Sep 27.

Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Many common and rare variants associated with hematologic traits have been discovered through imputation on large-scale reference panels. However, the majority of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been conducted in Europeans, and determining causal variants has proved challenging. We performed a GWAS of total leukocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, eosinophil, and basophil counts generated from 109,563,748 variants in the autosomes and the X chromosome in the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program, which included data from 61,802 individuals of diverse ancestry. We discovered and replicated 7 leukocyte trait associations, including (1) the association between a chromosome X, pseudo-autosomal region (PAR), noncoding variant located between cytokine receptor genes (CSF2RA and CLRF2) and lower eosinophil count; and (2) associations between single variants found predominantly among African Americans at the S1PR3 (9q22.1) and HBB (11p15.4) loci and monocyte and lymphocyte counts, respectively. We further provide evidence indicating that the newly discovered eosinophil-lowering chromosome X PAR variant might be associated with reduced susceptibility to common allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis and asthma. Additionally, we found a burden of very rare FLT3 (13q12.2) variants associated with monocyte counts. Together, these results emphasize the utility of whole-genome sequencing in diverse samples in identifying associations missed by European-ancestry-driven GWASs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.08.007DOI Listing
October 2021

Genome-wide Association Study of Lipid Traits in Youth With Type 2 Diabetes.

J Endocr Soc 2021 Nov 18;5(11):bvab139. Epub 2021 Aug 18.

Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Context: Dyslipidemia is highly prevalent in youth with type 2 diabetes (T2D), yet the pathogenic components of dyslipidemia in youth with T2D are poorly understood.

Objective: To evaluate the genetic determinants of lipid traits in youth with T2D through a genome-wide association study.

Design Participants And Main Outcome Measures: We genotyped 206 928 variants and imputed 17 642 824 variants in 1076 youth (mean age 15.0 ± 2.48 years) with T2D from the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) and SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth (SEARCH) studies as part of the Progress in Diabetes Genetics in Youth (ProDiGY) consortium. We performed association testing for triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) concentrations adjusted for the genetic relationship matrix within each substudy followed by meta-analyses for each trait.

Results: We identified a novel association between a deletion on chromosome 3 (3:67817380_AT/A_Deletion:RP11-81N13.1) and triglyceride levels at genome-wide level of significance ( = 2.3 × 10) with each risk allele increasing triglycerides by 20%. We also identified a genome-wide significant signal at rs247617 ( = 5.1 × 10) between and associated with HDL-c, with carriers of 1 copy of the risk allele having twice higher HDL-c.

Conclusions: Our genetic analyses of lipid traits in youth with T2D have identified 1 novel and 1 previously known locus. Additional studies are needed to further characterize the genetic architecture of dyslipidemia in youth with T2D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jendso/bvab139DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8459445PMC
November 2021

Peripheral Blood Cytopenia and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality.

J Am Heart Assoc 2021 Sep 13;10(18):e020809. Epub 2021 Sep 13.

Division of Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine Department of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, University of Colorado Aurora CO.

Background Individual blood cell count abnormalities have been associated with cardiovascular disease and increased mortality. In this study, we defined a "cytopenia phenotype," reflecting bone marrow hypoproliferation, to determine if peripheral blood cytopenia is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Methods and Results Study participants were derived from a biracial observational cohort study, REGARDS (Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke), that enrolled 30 239 Black and White participants aged ≥45 years between 2003 and 2007. Median follow up was ≈9 years. The current study included 19 864 participants from REGARDS study (37.9% men, 40% Black participants) who have complete blood count available at study enrollment. We defined a cytopenia phenotype based on age-, sex-, and race-adjusted lowest fifth percentile of blood counts. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models estimated the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CI of cytopenia for mortality and incident cardiovascular disease in adjusted models. Mean age of the study participants was 64 years (SD:9.7). The prevalence of cytopenia was 1.9% (n=378). Cytopenia was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.34-2.22) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.11-2.29). Cytopenia was associated with stroke risk in Black but not White participants (HR, 1.96 versus 0.86; -interaction for race=0.08) and was not associated with coronary heart disease risk. Conclusions We defined a cytopenia phenotype with clinical implications for mortality and stroke risk in a large biracial and geographically diverse population. Whether generated through somatic mutations or decreased organ function, cytopenia was associated with mortality risk and was a race-specific risk factor for stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.121.020809DOI Listing
September 2021

Multi-omics subtyping pipeline for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

PLoS One 2021 25;16(8):e0255337. Epub 2021 Aug 25.

Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, United States of America.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of mortality in the United States; however, COPD has heterogeneous clinical phenotypes. This is the first large scale attempt which uses transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics (multi-omics) to determine whether there are molecularly defined clusters with distinct clinical phenotypes that may underlie the clinical heterogeneity. Subjects included 3,278 subjects from the COPDGene cohort with at least one of the following profiles: whole blood transcriptomes (2,650 subjects); plasma proteomes (1,013 subjects); and plasma metabolomes (1,136 subjects). 489 subjects had all three contemporaneous -omics profiles. Autoencoder embeddings were performed individually for each -omics dataset. Embeddings underwent subspace clustering using MineClus, either individually by -omics or combined, followed by recursive feature selection based on Support Vector Machines. Clusters were tested for associations with clinical variables. Optimal single -omics clustering typically resulted in two clusters. Although there was overlap for individual -omics cluster membership, each -omics cluster tended to be defined by unique molecular pathways. For example, prominent molecular features of the metabolome-based clustering included sphingomyelin, while key molecular features of the transcriptome-based clusters were related to immune and bacterial responses. We also found that when we integrated the -omics data at a later stage, we identified subtypes that varied based on age, severity of disease, in addition to diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide, and precent on atrial fibrillation. In contrast, when we integrated the -omics data at an earlier stage by treating all data sets equally, there were no clinical differences between subtypes. Similar to clinical clustering, which has revealed multiple heterogenous clinical phenotypes, we show that transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics tend to define clusters of COPD patients with different clinical characteristics. Thus, integrating these different -omics data sets affords additional insight into the molecular nature of COPD and its heterogeneity.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0255337PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8386883PMC
August 2021

Citizen science reveals unexpected solute patterns in semiarid river networks.

PLoS One 2021 19;16(8):e0255411. Epub 2021 Aug 19.

Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States of America.

Human modification of water and nutrient flows has resulted in widespread degradation of aquatic ecosystems. The resulting global water crisis causes millions of deaths and trillions of USD in economic damages annually. Semiarid regions have been disproportionately affected because of high relative water demand and pollution. Many proven water management strategies are not fully implemented, partially because of a lack of public engagement with freshwater ecosystems. In this context, we organized a large citizen science initiative to quantify nutrient status and cultivate connection in the semiarid watershed of Utah Lake (USA). Working with community members, we collected samples from ~200 locations throughout the 7,640 km2 watershed on a single day in the spring, summer, and fall of 2018. We calculated ecohydrological metrics for nutrients, major ions, and carbon. For most solutes, concentration and leverage (influence on flux) were highest in lowland reaches draining directly to the lake, coincident with urban and agricultural sources. Solute sources were relatively persistent through time for most parameters despite substantial hydrological variation. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus species showed critical source area behavior, with 10-17% of the sites accounting for most of the flux. Unlike temperate watersheds, where spatial variability often decreases with watershed size, longitudinal variability showed an hourglass shape: high variability among headwaters, low variability in mid-order reaches, and high variability in tailwaters. This unexpected pattern was attributable to the distribution of human activity and hydrological complexity associated with return flows, losing river reaches, and diversions in the tailwaters. We conclude that participatory science has great potential to reveal ecohydrological patterns and rehabilitate individual and community relationships with local ecosystems. In this way, such projects represent an opportunity to both understand and improve water quality in diverse socioecological contexts.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0255411PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8376020PMC
August 2021

Genetic underpinnings of regional adiposity distribution in African Americans: Assessments from the Jackson Heart Study.

PLoS One 2021 4;16(8):e0255609. Epub 2021 Aug 4.

School of Public Health & Information Sciences, The University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, United States of America.

Background: African ancestry individuals with comparable overall anthropometric measures to Europeans have lower abdominal adiposity. To explore the genetic underpinning of different adiposity patterns, we investigated whether genetic risk scores for well-studied adiposity phenotypes like body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) also predict other, less commonly measured adiposity measures in 2420 African American individuals from the Jackson Heart Study.

Methods: Polygenic risk scores (PRS) were calculated using GWAS-significant variants extracted from published studies mostly representing European ancestry populations for BMI, waist-hip ratio (WHR) adjusted for BMI (WHRBMIadj), waist circumference adjusted for BMI (WCBMIadj), and body fat percentage (BF%). Associations between each PRS and adiposity measures including BF%, subcutaneous adiposity tissue (SAT), visceral adiposity tissue (VAT) and VAT:SAT ratio (VSR) were examined using multivariable linear regression, with or without BMI adjustment.

Results: In non-BMI adjusted models, all phenotype-PRS were found to be positive predictors of BF%, SAT and VAT. WHR-PRS was a positive predictor of VSR, but BF% and BMI-PRS were negative predictors of VSR. After adjusting for BMI, WHR-PRS remained a positive predictor of BF%, VAT and VSR but not SAT. WC-PRS was a positive predictor of SAT and VAT; BF%-PRS was a positive predictor of BF% and SAT only.

Conclusion: These analyses suggest that genetically driven increases in BF% strongly associate with subcutaneous rather than visceral adiposity and BF% is strongly associated with BMI but not central adiposity-associated genetic variants. How common genetic variants may contribute to observed differences in adiposity patterns between African and European ancestry individuals requires further study.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0255609PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8336790PMC
August 2021

Presence and transmission of mitochondrial heteroplasmic mutations in human populations of European and African ancestry.

Mitochondrion 2021 Sep 21;60:33-42. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA 01702, USA; Population Sciences Branch, NHLBI/NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

We investigated the concordance of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmic mutations (heteroplasmies) in 6745 maternal pairs of European (EA, n = 4718 pairs) and African (AA, n = 2027 pairs) Americans in whole blood. Mother-offspring pairs displayed the highest concordance rate, followed by sibling-sibling and more distantly-related maternal pairs. The allele fractions of concordant heteroplasmies exhibited high correlation (R = 0.8) between paired individuals. Discordant heteroplasmies were more likely to be in coding regions, be nonsynonymous or nonsynonymous-deleterious (p < 0.001). The number of deleterious heteroplasmies was significantly correlated with advancing age (20-44, 45-64, and ≥65 years, p-trend = 0.01). One standard deviation increase in heteroplasmic burden (i.e., the number of heteroplasmies carried by an individual) was associated with 0.17 to 0.26 (p < 1e - 23) standard deviation decrease in mtDNA copy number, independent of age. White blood cell count and differential count jointly explained 0.5% to 1.3% (p ≤ 0.001) variance in heteroplasmic burden. A genome-wide association and meta-analysis identified a region at 11p11.12 (top signal rs779031139, p = 2.0e - 18, minor allele frequency = 0.38) associated with the heteroplasmic burden. However, the 11p11.12 region is adjacent to a nuclear mitochondrial DNA (NUMT) corresponding to a 542 bp area of the D-loop. This region was no longer significant after excluding heteroplasmies within the 542 bp from the heteroplasmic burden. The discovery that blood mtDNA heteroplasmies were both inherited and somatic origins and that an increase in heteroplasmic burden was strongly associated with a decrease in average number of mtDNA copy number in blood are important findings to be considered in association studies of mtDNA with disease traits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mito.2021.07.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8464516PMC
September 2021

Genetic Risk Score for Type 2 Diabetes and Traits Related to Glucose-Insulin Homeostasis in Youth: The Exploring Perinatal Outcomes Among Children (EPOCH) Study.

Diabetes Care 2021 Sep 13;44(9):2018-2024. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

Division of Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO.

Objective: The metabolic phenotype of youth-onset type 2 diabetes (T2D) differs from that of adult-onset T2D, but little is known about genetic contributions. We aimed to evaluate the association between a T2D genetic risk score (GRS) and traits related to glucose-insulin homeostasis among healthy youth.

Research Design And Methods: We used data from 356 youth (mean age 16.7 years; 50% female) in the Exploring Perinatal Outcomes Among Children (EPOCH) cohort to calculate a standardized weighted GRS based on 271 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with T2D in adults. We used linear regression to assess associations of the GRS with log-transformed fasting glucose, 2-h glucose, HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), oral disposition index, and insulinogenic index adjusted for age, sex, BMI score, in utero exposure to maternal diabetes, and genetic principal components. We also evaluated effect modification by BMI score, in utero exposure to maternal diabetes, and ethnicity.

Results: Higher weighted GRS was associated with lower oral disposition index (β = -0.11; 95% CI -0.19, -0.02) and insulinogenic index (β = -0.08; 95% CI -0.17, -0.001), but not with fasting glucose (β = 0.01; 95% CI -0.01, 0.02), 2-h glucose (β = 0.03; 95% CI -0.0004, 0.06), or HOMA-IR (β = 0.02; 95% CI -0.04, 0.07). BMI score and in utero exposure to maternal diabetes increased the effect of the GRS on glucose levels.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that T2D genetic risk factors established in adults are relevant to glucose-insulin homeostasis in youth and that maintaining a healthy weight may be particularly important for youth with high genetic risk of T2D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc21-0464DOI Listing
September 2021

Multiethnic Genome-Wide Association Study of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes.

Circ Genom Precis Med 2021 Aug 9;14(4):e003258. Epub 2021 Jul 9.

Department of Epidemiology (N.F., G.H.), University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Background: Coronary artery calcification (CAC) and carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT) are measures of subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic individuals and strong risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an independent cardiovascular disease risk factor that accelerates atherosclerosis.

Methods: We performed meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies in up to 2500 T2D individuals of European ancestry (EA) and 1590 T2D individuals of African ancestry with or without exclusion of prevalent cardiovascular disease, for CAC measured by cardiac computed tomography, and 3608 individuals of EA and 838 individuals of African ancestry with T2D for cIMT measured by ultrasonography within the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) Consortium.

Results: We replicated 2 loci (rs9369640 and rs9349379 near and rs10757278 near ) for CAC and one locus for cIMT (rs7412 and rs445925 near ) that were previously reported in the general EA populations. We identified one novel CAC locus (rs8000449 near at 13q13.3) at =2.0×10 in EA. No additional loci were identified with the meta-analyses of EA and African ancestry. The expression quantitative trait loci analysis with nearby expressed genes derived from arterial wall and metabolic tissues from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project pinpoints , encoding a matricellular protein involved in bone formation and bone matrix organization, as the potential candidate gene at this locus. In addition, we found significant associations (<3.1×10) for 3 previously reported coronary artery disease loci for these subclinical atherosclerotic phenotypes (rs2891168 near and rs11170820 near for CAC, and rs7412 near for cIMT).

Conclusions: Our results provide potential biological mechanisms that could link CAC and cIMT to increased cardiovascular disease risk in individuals with T2D.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCGEN.120.003258DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8435075PMC
August 2021

Genetic Interactions with Intrauterine Diabetes Exposure in Relation to Obesity: The EPOCH and Project Viva Studies.

Pediatr Rep 2021 Jun 1;13(2):279-288. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Division of Biomedical Informatics and Personalized Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.

To examine whether BMI-associated genetic risk variants modify the association of intrauterine diabetes exposure with childhood BMI z-scores, we assessed the interaction between 95 BMI-associated genetic variants and in utero exposure to maternal diabetes among 459 children in the Exploring Perinatal Outcomes among Children historical prospective cohort study (n = 86 exposed; 373 unexposed) in relation to age- and sex-standardized childhood BMI z-scores (mean age = 10.3 years, standard deviation = 1.5 years). For the genetic variants showing a nominally significant interaction, we assessed the relationship in an additional 621 children in Project Viva, which is an independent longitudinal cohort study, and used meta-analysis to combine the results for the two studies. Seven of the ninety-five genetic variants tested exhibited a nominally significant interaction with in utero exposure to maternal diabetes in relation to the offspring BMI z-score in EPOCH. Five of the seven variants exhibited a consistent direction of interaction effect across both EPOCH and Project Viva. While none achieved statistical significance in the meta-analysis after accounting for multiple testing, three variants exhibited a nominally significant interaction with in utero exposure to maternal diabetes in relation to offspring BMI z-score: rs10733682 near (interaction β = 0.39; standard error (SE) = 0.17), rs17001654 near (β = 0.53; SE = 0.22), and rs16951275 near (β = 0.37; SE = 0.17). BMI-associated genetic variants may enhance the association between exposure to in utero diabetes and higher childhood BMI, but larger studies of in utero exposures are necessary to confirm the observed nominally significant relationships.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/pediatric13020036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8293453PMC
June 2021

Associations of Nutrient Intake Changes During Childhood with Adolescent Hepatic Fat: The Exploring Perinatal Outcomes Among CHildren Study.

J Pediatr 2021 Oct 24;237:50-58.e3. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; Lifecourse Epidemiology of Adiposity and Diabetes (LEAD) Center, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO; Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO.

Objective: To examine associations of dietary changes from childhood to adolescence with adolescent hepatic fat and whether the PNPLA3 rs738409 risk allele, a strong genetic risk factor for hepatic fat, modifies associations.

Study Design: Data were from 358 participants in the Exploring Perinatal Outcomes among CHildren (EPOCH) study, a longitudinal cohort in Colorado. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaire in childhood (approximately 10 years of age) and adolescence (approximately 16 years of age) and converted to nutrient densities. Hepatic fat was assessed in adolescence by magnetic resonance imaging. Linear regression was used to test associations of dietary changes from childhood to adolescence with adolescent hepatic fat.

Results: Increases in fiber, vegetable protein, and polyunsaturated fat intake from childhood to adolescence were associated with lower adolescent hepatic fat, and increases in animal protein were associated with higher hepatic fat (β per 5-unit increase on log-hepatic fat: -0.12 [95% CI, -0.21 to -0.02] for ▵fiber; -0.26 [95% CI, -0.45 to -0.07] for ▵vegetable protein; -0.18 [95% CI, -0.35 to -0.02] for ▵polyunsaturated fat; 0.13 [95% CI, 0.04-0.22] for ▵animal protein). There was evidence of effect modification by PNPLA3 variant, whereby inverse associations of ▵fiber and ▵vegetable protein and positive associations of ▵saturated fat with adolescent hepatic fat were stronger in risk allele carriers. Most conclusions were similar after adjusting for obesity in adolescence, but associations of ▵saturated fat with hepatic fat were attenuated toward the null.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that nutrient intake changes between childhood and adolescence, particularly decreases in fiber and vegetable protein and increases in saturated fat intake, interact with the PNPLA3 variant to predict higher hepatic fat in adolescence, and may be targets for reducing hepatic fat in high-risk youth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2021.06.027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8478817PMC
October 2021

Determinants of penetrance and variable expressivity in monogenic metabolic conditions across 77,184 exomes.

Nat Commun 2021 06 9;12(1):3505. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Hundreds of thousands of genetic variants have been reported to cause severe monogenic diseases, but the probability that a variant carrier develops the disease (termed penetrance) is unknown for virtually all of them. Additionally, the clinical utility of common polygenetic variation remains uncertain. Using exome sequencing from 77,184 adult individuals (38,618 multi-ancestral individuals from a type 2 diabetes case-control study and 38,566 participants from the UK Biobank, for whom genotype array data were also available), we apply clinical standard-of-care gene variant curation for eight monogenic metabolic conditions. Rare variants causing monogenic diabetes and dyslipidemias display effect sizes significantly larger than the top 1% of the corresponding polygenic scores. Nevertheless, penetrance estimates for monogenic variant carriers average 60% or lower for most conditions. We assess epidemiologic and genetic factors contributing to risk prediction in monogenic variant carriers, demonstrating that inclusion of polygenic variation significantly improves biomarker estimation for two monogenic dyslipidemias.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-23556-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8190084PMC
June 2021

DNAm-based signatures of accelerated aging and mortality in blood are associated with low renal function.

Clin Epigenetics 2021 Jun 2;13(1):121. Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Background: The difference between an individual's chronological and DNA methylation predicted age (DNAmAge), termed DNAmAge acceleration (DNAmAA), can capture life-long environmental exposures and age-related physiological changes reflected in methylation status. Several studies have linked DNAmAA to morbidity and mortality, yet its relationship with kidney function has not been assessed. We evaluated the associations between seven DNAm aging and lifespan predictors (as well as GrimAge components) and five kidney traits (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio [uACR], serum urate, microalbuminuria and chronic kidney disease [CKD]) in up to 9688 European, African American and Hispanic/Latino individuals from seven population-based studies.

Results: We identified 23 significant associations in our large trans-ethnic meta-analysis (p < 1.43E-03 and consistent direction of effect across studies). Age acceleration measured by the Extrinsic and PhenoAge estimators, as well as Zhang's 10-CpG epigenetic mortality risk score (MRS), were associated with all parameters of poor kidney health (lower eGFR, prevalent CKD, higher uACR, microalbuminuria and higher serum urate). Six of these associations were independently observed in European and African American populations. MRS in particular was consistently associated with eGFR (β =  - 0.12, 95% CI = [- 0.16, - 0.08] change in log-transformed eGFR per unit increase in MRS, p = 4.39E-08), prevalent CKD (odds ratio (OR) = 1.78 [1.47, 2.16], p = 2.71E-09) and higher serum urate levels (β = 0.12 [0.07, 0.16], p = 2.08E-06). The "first-generation" clocks (Hannum, Horvath) and GrimAge showed different patterns of association with the kidney traits. Three of the DNAm-estimated components of GrimAge, namely adrenomedullin, plasminogen-activation inhibition 1 and pack years, were positively associated with higher uACR, serum urate and microalbuminuria.

Conclusion: DNAmAge acceleration and DNAm mortality predictors estimated in whole blood were associated with multiple kidney traits, including eGFR and CKD, in this multi-ethnic study. Epigenetic biomarkers which reflect the systemic effects of age-related mechanisms such as immunosenescence, inflammaging and oxidative stress may have important mechanistic or prognostic roles in kidney disease. Our study highlights new findings linking kidney disease to biological aging, and opportunities warranting future investigation into DNA methylation biomarkers for prognostic or risk stratification in kidney disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13148-021-01082-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8170969PMC
June 2021

The trans-ancestral genomic architecture of glycemic traits.

Nat Genet 2021 06 31;53(6):840-860. Epub 2021 May 31.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Glycemic traits are used to diagnose and monitor type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic health. To date, most genetic studies of glycemic traits have focused on individuals of European ancestry. Here we aggregated genome-wide association studies comprising up to 281,416 individuals without diabetes (30% non-European ancestry) for whom fasting glucose, 2-h glucose after an oral glucose challenge, glycated hemoglobin and fasting insulin data were available. Trans-ancestry and single-ancestry meta-analyses identified 242 loci (99 novel; P < 5 × 10), 80% of which had no significant evidence of between-ancestry heterogeneity. Analyses restricted to individuals of European ancestry with equivalent sample size would have led to 24 fewer new loci. Compared with single-ancestry analyses, equivalent-sized trans-ancestry fine-mapping reduced the number of estimated variants in 99% credible sets by a median of 37.5%. Genomic-feature, gene-expression and gene-set analyses revealed distinct biological signatures for each trait, highlighting different underlying biological pathways. Our results increase our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology by using trans-ancestry studies for improved power and resolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-021-00852-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7610958PMC
June 2021

Epigenome-wide association study of kidney function identifies trans-ethnic and ethnic-specific loci.

Genome Med 2021 Apr 30;13(1):74. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Background: DNA methylation (DNAm) is associated with gene regulation and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function. Decreased eGFR is more common among US Hispanics and African Americans. The causes for this are poorly understood. We aimed to identify trans-ethnic and ethnic-specific differentially methylated positions (DMPs) associated with eGFR using an agnostic, genome-wide approach.

Methods: The study included up to 5428 participants from multi-ethnic studies for discovery and 8109 participants for replication. We tested the associations between whole blood DNAm and eGFR using beta values from Illumina 450K or EPIC arrays. Ethnicity-stratified analyses were performed using linear mixed models adjusting for age, sex, smoking, and study-specific and technical variables. Summary results were meta-analyzed within and across ethnicities. Findings were assessed using integrative epigenomics methods and pathway analyses.

Results: We identified 93 DMPs associated with eGFR at an FDR of 0.05 and replicated 13 and 1 DMPs across independent samples in trans-ethnic and African American meta-analyses, respectively. The study also validated 6 previously published DMPs. Identified DMPs showed significant overlap enrichment with DNase I hypersensitive sites in kidney tissue, sites associated with the expression of proximal genes, and transcription factor motifs and pathways associated with kidney tissue and kidney development.

Conclusions: We uncovered trans-ethnic and ethnic-specific DMPs associated with eGFR, including DMPs enriched in regulatory elements in kidney tissue and pathways related to kidney development. These findings shed light on epigenetic mechanisms associated with kidney function, bridging the gap between population-specific eGFR-associated DNAm and tissue-specific regulatory context.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13073-021-00877-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8088054PMC
April 2021

Soluble CD14 Levels in the Jackson Heart Study: Associations With Cardiovascular Disease Risk and Genetic Variants.

Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 2021 06 29;41(6):e369-e378. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (N.A.Z., R.P.T., N.C.O.), Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington.

[Figure: see text].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/ATVBAHA.121.316035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8159903PMC
June 2021

Whole-genome sequencing association analysis of quantitative red blood cell phenotypes: The NHLBI TOPMed program.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 05 21;108(5):874-893. Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216, USA.

Whole-genome sequencing (WGS), a powerful tool for detecting novel coding and non-coding disease-causing variants, has largely been applied to clinical diagnosis of inherited disorders. Here we leveraged WGS data in up to 62,653 ethnically diverse participants from the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) program and assessed statistical association of variants with seven red blood cell (RBC) quantitative traits. We discovered 14 single variant-RBC trait associations at 12 genomic loci, which have not been reported previously. Several of the RBC trait-variant associations (RPN1, ELL2, MIDN, HBB, HBA1, PIEZO1, and G6PD) were replicated in independent GWAS datasets imputed to the TOPMed reference panel. Most of these discovered variants are rare/low frequency, and several are observed disproportionately among non-European Ancestry (African, Hispanic/Latino, or East Asian) populations. We identified a 3 bp indel p.Lys2169del (g.88717175_88717177TCT[4]) (common only in the Ashkenazi Jewish population) of PIEZO1, a gene responsible for the Mendelian red cell disorder hereditary xerocytosis (MIM: 194380), associated with higher mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). In stepwise conditional analysis and in gene-based rare variant aggregated association analysis, we identified several of the variants in HBB, HBA1, TMPRSS6, and G6PD that represent the carrier state for known coding, promoter, or splice site loss-of-function variants that cause inherited RBC disorders. Finally, we applied base and nuclease editing to demonstrate that the sentinel variant rs112097551 (nearest gene RPN1) acts through a cis-regulatory element that exerts long-range control of the gene RUVBL1 which is essential for hematopoiesis. Together, these results demonstrate the utility of WGS in ethnically diverse population-based samples and gene editing for expanding knowledge of the genetic architecture of quantitative hematologic traits and suggest a continuum between complex trait and Mendelian red cell disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.04.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8206199PMC
May 2021

Chromosome Xq23 is associated with lower atherogenic lipid concentrations and favorable cardiometabolic indices.

Nat Commun 2021 04 12;12(1):2182. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Division of Cardiology, George Washington University School of Medicine and Healthcare Sciences, Washington, DC, USA.

Autosomal genetic analyses of blood lipids have yielded key insights for coronary heart disease (CHD). However, X chromosome genetic variation is understudied for blood lipids in large sample sizes. We now analyze genetic and blood lipid data in a high-coverage whole X chromosome sequencing study of 65,322 multi-ancestry participants and perform replication among 456,893 European participants. Common alleles on chromosome Xq23 are strongly associated with reduced total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides (min P = 8.5 × 10), with similar effects for males and females. Chromosome Xq23 lipid-lowering alleles are associated with reduced odds for CHD among 42,545 cases and 591,247 controls (P = 1.7 × 10), and reduced odds for diabetes mellitus type 2 among 54,095 cases and 573,885 controls (P = 1.4 × 10). Although we observe an association with increased BMI, waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI is reduced, bioimpedance analyses indicate increased gluteofemoral fat, and abdominal MRI analyses indicate reduced visceral adiposity. Co-localization analyses strongly correlate increased CHRDL1 gene expression, particularly in adipose tissue, with reduced concentrations of blood lipids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-22339-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8042019PMC
April 2021

Discovery and fine-mapping of height loci via high-density imputation of GWASs in individuals of African ancestry.

Am J Hum Genet 2021 04 12;108(4):564-582. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

The Charles R. Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Although many loci have been associated with height in European ancestry populations, very few have been identified in African ancestry individuals. Furthermore, many of the known loci have yet to be generalized to and fine-mapped within a large-scale African ancestry sample. We performed sex-combined and sex-stratified meta-analyses in up to 52,764 individuals with height and genome-wide genotyping data from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC). We additionally combined our African ancestry meta-analysis results with published European genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. In the African ancestry analyses, we identified three novel loci (SLC4A3, NCOA2, ECD/FAM149B1) in sex-combined results and two loci (CRB1, KLF6) in women only. In the African plus European sex-combined GWAS, we identified an additional three novel loci (RCCD1, G6PC3, CEP95) which were equally driven by AAAGC and European results. Among 39 genome-wide significant signals at known loci, conditioning index SNPs from European studies identified 20 secondary signals. Two of the 20 new secondary signals and none of the 8 novel loci had minor allele frequencies (MAF) < 5%. Of 802 known European height signals, 643 displayed directionally consistent associations with height, of which 205 were nominally significant (p < 0.05) in the African ancestry sex-combined sample. Furthermore, 148 of 241 loci contained ≤20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% of the posterior probability of driving the associations. In summary, trans-ethnic meta-analyses revealed novel signals and further improved fine-mapping of putative causal variants in loci shared between African and European ancestry populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.02.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8059339PMC
April 2021

Sequencing of 53,831 diverse genomes from the NHLBI TOPMed Program.

Nature 2021 02 10;590(7845):290-299. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA.

The Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) programme seeks to elucidate the genetic architecture and biology of heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders, with the ultimate goal of improving diagnosis, treatment and prevention of these diseases. The initial phases of the programme focused on whole-genome sequencing of individuals with rich phenotypic data and diverse backgrounds. Here we describe the TOPMed goals and design as well as the available resources and early insights obtained from the sequence data. The resources include a variant browser, a genotype imputation server, and genomic and phenotypic data that are available through dbGaP (Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes). In the first 53,831 TOPMed samples, we detected more than 400 million single-nucleotide and insertion or deletion variants after alignment with the reference genome. Additional previously undescribed variants were detected through assembly of unmapped reads and customized analysis in highly variable loci. Among the more than 400 million detected variants, 97% have frequencies of less than 1% and 46% are singletons that are present in only one individual (53% among unrelated individuals). These rare variants provide insights into mutational processes and recent human evolutionary history. The extensive catalogue of genetic variation in TOPMed studies provides unique opportunities for exploring the contributions of rare and noncoding sequence variants to phenotypic variation. Furthermore, combining TOPMed haplotypes with modern imputation methods improves the power and reach of genome-wide association studies to include variants down to a frequency of approximately 0.01%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03205-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7875770PMC
February 2021

Whole genome sequence analyses of eGFR in 23,732 people representing multiple ancestries in the NHLBI trans-omics for precision medicine (TOPMed) consortium.

EBioMedicine 2021 Jan 6;63:103157. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States.

Background: Genetic factors that influence kidney traits have been understudied for low frequency and ancestry-specific variants.

Methods: We combined whole genome sequencing (WGS) data from 23,732 participants from 10 NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program multi-ethnic studies to identify novel loci for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Participants included European, African, East Asian, and Hispanic ancestries. We applied linear mixed models using a genetic relationship matrix estimated from the WGS data and adjusted for age, sex, study, and ethnicity.

Findings: When testing single variants, we identified three novel loci driven by low frequency variants more commonly observed in non-European ancestry (PRKAA2, rs180996919, minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.04%, P = 6.1 × 10; METTL8, rs116951054, MAF 0.09%, P = 4.5 × 10; and MATK, rs539182790, MAF 0.05%, P = 3.4 × 10). We also replicated two known loci for common variants (rs2461702, MAF=0.49, P = 1.2 × 10, nearest gene GATM, and rs71147340, MAF=0.34, P = 3.3 × 10, CDK12). Testing aggregated variants within a gene identified the MAF gene. A statistical approach based on local ancestry helped to identify replication samples for ancestry-specific variants.

Interpretation: This study highlights challenges in studying variants influencing kidney traits that are low frequency in populations and more common in non-European ancestry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2020.103157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7804602PMC
January 2021

Novel genetic risk factors influence progression of islet autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes.

Sci Rep 2020 11 5;10(1):19193. Epub 2020 Nov 5.

Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, PO Box 800717, Charlottesville, VA, 22908, USA.

Type 1 diabetes arises from the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta-cells of the pancreas, resulting in dependence on exogenously administered insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis. In this study, our aim was to identify genetic risk factors that contribute to progression from islet autoimmunity to clinical type 1 diabetes. We analyzed 6.8 million variants derived from whole genome sequencing of 160 islet autoantibody positive subjects, including 87 who had progressed to type 1 diabetes. The Cox proportional-hazard model for survival analysis was used to identify genetic variants associated with progression. We identified one novel region, 20p12.1 (TASP1; genome-wide P < 5 × 10) and three regions, 1q21.3 (MRPS21-PRPF3), 2p25.2 (NRIR), 3q22.1 (COL6A6), with suggestive evidence of association (P < 8.5 × 10) with progression from islet autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes. Once islet autoimmunity is initiated, functional mapping identified two critical pathways, response to viral infections and interferon signaling, as contributing to disease progression. These results provide evidence that genetic pathways involved in progression from islet autoimmunity differ from those pathways identified once disease has been established. These results support the need for further investigation of genetic risk factors that modulate initiation and progression of subclinical disease to inform efforts in development of novel strategies for prediction and intervention of type 1 diabetes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-75690-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7645414PMC
November 2020

Meta-analysis uncovers genome-wide significant variants for rapid kidney function decline.

Kidney Int 2021 04 31;99(4):926-939. Epub 2020 Oct 31.

Division of Nephrology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Kidney Research Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Rapid decline of glomerular filtration rate estimated from creatinine (eGFRcrea) is associated with severe clinical endpoints. In contrast to cross-sectionally assessed eGFRcrea, the genetic basis for rapid eGFRcrea decline is largely unknown. To help define this, we meta-analyzed 42 genome-wide association studies from the Chronic Kidney Diseases Genetics Consortium and United Kingdom Biobank to identify genetic loci for rapid eGFRcrea decline. Two definitions of eGFRcrea decline were used: 3 mL/min/1.73m/year or more ("Rapid3"; encompassing 34,874 cases, 107,090 controls) and eGFRcrea decline 25% or more and eGFRcrea under 60 mL/min/1.73m at follow-up among those with eGFRcrea 60 mL/min/1.73m or more at baseline ("CKDi25"; encompassing 19,901 cases, 175,244 controls). Seven independent variants were identified across six loci for Rapid3 and/or CKDi25: consisting of five variants at four loci with genome-wide significance (near UMOD-PDILT (2), PRKAG2, WDR72, OR2S2) and two variants among 265 known eGFRcrea variants (near GATM, LARP4B). All these loci were novel for Rapid3 and/or CKDi25 and our bioinformatic follow-up prioritized variants and genes underneath these loci. The OR2S2 locus is novel for any eGFRcrea trait including interesting candidates. For the five genome-wide significant lead variants, we found supporting effects for annual change in blood urea nitrogen or cystatin-based eGFR, but not for GATM or LARP4B. Individuals at high compared to those at low genetic risk (8-14 vs. 0-5 adverse alleles) had a 1.20-fold increased risk of acute kidney injury (95% confidence interval 1.08-1.33). Thus, our identified loci for rapid kidney function decline may help prioritize therapeutic targets and identify mechanisms and individuals at risk for sustained deterioration of kidney function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.kint.2020.09.030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8010357PMC
April 2021

Inherited causes of clonal haematopoiesis in 97,691 whole genomes.

Nature 2020 10 14;586(7831):763-768. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Age is the dominant risk factor for most chronic human diseases, but the mechanisms through which ageing confers this risk are largely unknown. The age-related acquisition of somatic mutations that lead to clonal expansion in regenerating haematopoietic stem cell populations has recently been associated with both haematological cancer and coronary heart disease-this phenomenon is termed clonal haematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP). Simultaneous analyses of germline and somatic whole-genome sequences provide the opportunity to identify root causes of CHIP. Here we analyse high-coverage whole-genome sequences from 97,691 participants of diverse ancestries in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Trans-omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) programme, and identify 4,229 individuals with CHIP. We identify associations with blood cell, lipid and inflammatory traits that are specific to different CHIP driver genes. Association of a genome-wide set of germline genetic variants enabled the identification of three genetic loci associated with CHIP status, including one locus at TET2 that was specific to individuals of African ancestry. In silico-informed in vitro evaluation of the TET2 germline locus enabled the identification of a causal variant that disrupts a TET2 distal enhancer, resulting in increased self-renewal of haematopoietic stem cells. Overall, we observe that germline genetic variation shapes haematopoietic stem cell function, leading to CHIP through mechanisms that are specific to clonal haematopoiesis as well as shared mechanisms that lead to somatic mutations across tissues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2819-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7944936PMC
October 2020

Whole genome sequence analysis of pulmonary function and COPD in 19,996 multi-ethnic participants.

Nat Commun 2020 10 14;11(1):5182. Epub 2020 Oct 14.

The Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, The Department of Pediatrics, The Lundquist Institute for Biomedical Innovation at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA, 90502, USA.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diagnosed by reduced lung function, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. We performed whole genome sequence (WGS) analysis of lung function and COPD in a multi-ethnic sample of 11,497 participants from population- and family-based studies, and 8499 individuals from COPD-enriched studies in the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program. We identify at genome-wide significance 10 known GWAS loci and 22 distinct, previously unreported loci, including two common variant signals from stratified analysis of African Americans. Four novel common variants within the regions of PIAS1, RGN (two variants) and FTO show evidence of replication in the UK Biobank (European ancestry n ~ 320,000), while colocalization analyses leveraging multi-omic data from GTEx and TOPMed identify potential molecular mechanisms underlying four of the 22 novel loci. Our study demonstrates the value of performing WGS analyses and multi-omic follow-up in cohorts of diverse ancestry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-18334-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7598941PMC
October 2020

Genetic Studies of Leptin Concentrations Implicate Leptin in the Regulation of Early Adiposity.

Diabetes 2020 12 11;69(12):2806-2818. Epub 2020 Sep 11.

Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Leptin influences food intake by informing the brain about the status of body fat stores. Rare mutations associated with congenital leptin deficiency cause severe early-onset obesity that can be mitigated by administering leptin. However, the role of genetic regulation of leptin in polygenic obesity remains poorly understood. We performed an exome-based analysis in up to 57,232 individuals of diverse ancestries to identify genetic variants that influence adiposity-adjusted leptin concentrations. We identify five novel variants, including four missense variants, in , , , and , and one intergenic variant near The missense variant Val94Met (rs17151919) in was common in individuals of African ancestry only, and its association with lower leptin concentrations was specific to this ancestry ( = 2 × 10, = 3,901). Using in vitro analyses, we show that the Met94 allele decreases leptin secretion. We also show that the Met94 allele is associated with higher BMI in young African-ancestry children but not in adults, suggesting that leptin regulates early adiposity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db20-0070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7679778PMC
December 2020

The Polygenic and Monogenic Basis of Blood Traits and Diseases.

Cell 2020 09;182(5):1214-1231.e11

Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Science, National Institute on Aging/NIH, Baltimore, MD, 21224, USA.

Blood cells play essential roles in human health, underpinning physiological processes such as immunity, oxygen transport, and clotting, which when perturbed cause a significant global health burden. Here we integrate data from UK Biobank and a large-scale international collaborative effort, including data for 563,085 European ancestry participants, and discover 5,106 new genetic variants independently associated with 29 blood cell phenotypes covering a range of variation impacting hematopoiesis. We holistically characterize the genetic architecture of hematopoiesis, assess the relevance of the omnigenic model to blood cell phenotypes, delineate relevant hematopoietic cell states influenced by regulatory genetic variants and gene networks, identify novel splice-altering variants mediating the associations, and assess the polygenic prediction potential for blood traits and clinical disorders at the interface of complex and Mendelian genetics. These results show the power of large-scale blood cell trait GWAS to interrogate clinically meaningful variants across a wide allelic spectrum of human variation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2020.08.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7482360PMC
September 2020

Trans-ethnic and Ancestry-Specific Blood-Cell Genetics in 746,667 Individuals from 5 Global Populations.

Cell 2020 09;182(5):1198-1213.e14

Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center (MAVERIC), VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA 02130, USA; Department of Medicine, Division on Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Most loci identified by GWASs have been found in populations of European ancestry (EUR). In trans-ethnic meta-analyses for 15 hematological traits in 746,667 participants, including 184,535 non-EUR individuals, we identified 5,552 trait-variant associations at p < 5 × 10, including 71 novel associations not found in EUR populations. We also identified 28 additional novel variants in ancestry-specific, non-EUR meta-analyses, including an IL7 missense variant in South Asians associated with lymphocyte count in vivo and IL-7 secretion levels in vitro. Fine-mapping prioritized variants annotated as functional and generated 95% credible sets that were 30% smaller when using the trans-ethnic as opposed to the EUR-only results. We explored the clinical significance and predictive value of trans-ethnic variants in multiple populations and compared genetic architecture and the effect of natural selection on these blood phenotypes between populations. Altogether, our results for hematological traits highlight the value of a more global representation of populations in genetic studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2020.06.045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7480402PMC
September 2020
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