Publications by authors named "Lena Wang"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

In vivo potential effects of adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B on lung carcinogenesis and lymphoproliferative inflammation.

J Virol 2008 Aug 4;82(16):8105-11. Epub 2008 Jun 4.

Center for Cancer Research, NCI, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA.

Triggering uncontrolled cellular proliferation, chronic inflammation, and/or disruption of p53 activity is critical for tumorigenesis initiated by latent viral oncogenes. The adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) early genes E1A and E1B can maintain lifelong latency in the lungs of patients with chronic pulmonary diseases. To determine the in vivo effects of the latent Ad5 E1A and E1B oncogenes, we have examined the influence of Ad5 E1A and E1B gene products on mouse lung carcinogenesis and inflammation by generation and characterization of lung-specific transgenic mouse models. Here, we show that either the Ad5 E1A 243-amino-acid (aa) protein or the E1B 58-kDa protein was dominantly expressed in the transgenic lung. Preferential expression of Ad5 E1A 243-aa protein alone was not sufficient to induce lung carcinogenesis but resulted in low-grade cellular proliferation and high-grade lymphoproliferative inflammation in the lung. The presence of Ad5 E1B dramatically enhanced the expression of the E1A 243-aa protein, in addition to impairing p53 and apoptosis response, resulting in uncontrolled cellular proliferation, lymphoproliferative inflammation, and metastatic carcinomas in the lung after a period of latency. Our studies may provide clues to understanding the potential in vivo biological effects of Ad5 E1A and E1B latent in the lung and a new scope for assessing in vivo functions of viral genes latent in the infection target tissue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00536-08DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2519581PMC
August 2008

Purification and protective efficacy of monomeric and modified Yersinia pestis capsular F1-V antigen fusion proteins for vaccination against plague.

Protein Expr Purif 2007 May 31;53(1):63-79. Epub 2006 Dec 31.

Bacteriology Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.

The F1-V vaccine antigen, protective against Yersinia pestis, exhibits a strong tendency to multimerize that affects larger-scale manufacture and characterization. In this work, the sole F1-V cysteine was replaced with serine by site-directed mutagenesis for characterization of F1-V non-covalent multimer interactions and protective potency without participation by disulfide-linkages. F1-V and F1-V(C424S) proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, recovered using mechanical lysis/pH-modulation and purified from urea-solubilized soft inclusion bodies, using successive ion-exchange, ceramic hydroxyapatite, and size-exclusion chromatography. This purification method resulted in up to 2mg/g of cell paste of 95% pure, mono-disperse protein having < or =0.5 endotoxin units per mg by a kinetic chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate reactivity assay. Both F1-V and F1-V(C424S) were monomeric at pH 10.0 and progressively self-associated as pH conditions decreased to pH 6.0. Solution additives were screened for their ability to inhibit F1-V self-association at pH 6.5. An L-arginine buffer provided the greatest stabilizing effect. Conversion to >500-kDa multimers occurred between pH 6.0 and 5.0. Conditions for efficient F1-V adsorption to the cGMP-compatible alhydrogel adjuvant were optimized. Side-by-side evaluation for protective potency against subcutaneous plague infection in mice was conducted for F1-V(C424S) monomer; cysteine-capped F1-V monomer; cysteine-capped F1-V multimer; and a F1-V standard reported previously. After a two-dose vaccination with 2 x 20 microg of F1-V, respectively, 100%, 80%, 80%, and 70% of injected mice survived a subcutaneous lethal plague challenge with 10(8) LD(50)Y. pestis CO92. Thus, vaccination with F1-V monomer and multimeric forms resulted in significant, and essentially equivalent, protection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2006.12.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2811967PMC
May 2007

Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on inflammation in the skin.

Adv Dermatol 2002 ;18:247-86

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, USA.

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February 2003

Berloque dermatitis induced by "Florida water".

Cutis 2002 Jul;70(1):29-30

School of Medicine, University of Texas at Southwestern, Dallas, USA.

Phytophotodermatitis is a phototoxic dermatitis resulting from contact with psoralen-containing plants such as celery, limes, parsley, figs, and carrots. Berloque dermatitis is a variant of phytophotodermatitis and is caused by high concentrations of psoralen-containing fragrances, most commonly oil of bergamot. Berloque dermatitis is rarely seen today because of the removal of these fragrances from most cosmetic products in the United States. We report, however, a group of patients still at risk for berloque dermatitis. These patients use the colognes "Florida Water" and "Kananga Water," which are popular in Hispanic, African American, and Caribbean populations. These fragrant waters are used for spiritual blessing, treating headaches, and personal hygiene.
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July 2002
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