Publications by authors named "Lena Fels"

4 Publications

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Challenging diagnostic work-up of a massive fluid-filled structure in the cranial abdomen of a cat.

Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Small Animal Clinic, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation.

A 9-year-old female, neutered European shorthair cat was presented with acute vomiting, obvious jaundice and painful enlargement of the abdomen. Icteric skin and mucous membranes in addition to severe bilirubinaemia (mainly direct bilirubin) and a large increase in liver enzyme activities were the main findings at the initial examination. Radio- and ultrasonographic evaluation revealed a massive fluid-filled structure caudal to the liver displacing abdominal organs, in particular the stomach. As this structure with a diameter of 8-10 cm occupied considerable space in the cranioventral abdomen, a detailed ultrasonographic examination of the liver and the gallbladder, and determination of the structure's association with a particular abdominal organ was initially impossible. Via ultrasound-assisted puncture under general anaesthesia 300 ml of an almost clear fluid could be aspirated. Cytological examination revealed a cyst content-like fluid with cell detritus.Further ultrasonographic and computed tomographic diagnostics followed by abdominal laparotomy finally enabled diagnosis of a cystic dilatation of the entire common bile duct and accumulation of white bile. Histopathological examination after euthanasia (requested by the owner) identified lymphoplasmacytic cholangitis and necrosis of the duodenal papilla. The massive dilatation of the common bile duct complicated its definite diagnosis by diagnostic imaging methods. It was most likely caused by a longer-standing obstruction of the bile flow by lymphoplasmacytic cholangitis with necrosis and granulation tissue formation in the area of the duodenal papilla. An interesting but initially misleading feature was the presence of white bile. The etiology of this extremely rare condition remains obscure but in the described case a manifestation of impaired hepatocyte function secondary to biliary stasis is suspected to be the cause.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1518-6202DOI Listing
October 2021

[Atypical Cushing's syndrome in a dog. A case report].

Tierarztl Prax Ausg K Kleintiere Heimtiere 2017 06 27;45(3):186-192. Epub 2017 Apr 27.

Prof. Dr. Reinhard Mischke, Klinik für Kleintiere, Stiftung Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, Bünteweg 9, 30559 Hannover, E-Mail:

In a 12-year-old male Labrador Retriever, presented due to other disease symptoms, clinical signs of hyperadrenocorticism (polyuria, polydipsia, abdominal distention, muscle atrophy) were an incidental finding. Abnormal laboratory results and sonographic findings of the adrenal glands, but negative low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests with low basal cortisol concentrations, a negative andrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulation test and exclusion of iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism, suggested an atypical hyperadrenocorticism (AHAC). Results of further examinations, particularly stimulation of progesterone production by ACTH (0 h value: 0.21 ng/ml; 1 h value: 4.9 ng/ml) and good response to therapy with trilostane, supported this diagnosis. However, it has to be critically considered, whether and to what extent additionally present diseases (arthroses, testicular tumour) played a role regarding the symptoms and laboratory results in this dog. This case illustrates the difficulties with the diagnosis of AHAC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15654/TPK-160255DOI Listing
June 2017

Identification and validation of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for canine hip dysplasia (CHD) in German Shepherd Dogs.

PLoS One 2014 6;9(5):e96618. Epub 2014 May 6.

Institute for Animal Breeding and Genetics, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany.

Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is the most common hereditary skeletal disorder in dogs. To identify common alleles associated with CHD, we genotyped 96 German Shepherd Dogs affected by mild, moderate and severe CHD and 96 breed, sex, age and birth year matched controls using the Affymetrix canine high density SNP chip. A mixed linear model analysis identified five SNPs associated with CHD scores on dog chromosomes (CFA) 19, 24, 26 and 34. These five SNPs were validated in a by sex, age, birth year and coancestry stratified sample of 843 German Shepherd Dogs including 277 unaffected dogs and 566 CHD-affected dogs. Mean coancestry coefficients among and within cases and controls were <0.1%. Genotype effects of these SNPs explained 20-32% of the phenotypic variance of CHD in German Shepherd Dogs employed for validation. Genome-wide significance in the validation data set could be shown for each one CHD-associated SNP on CFA24, 26 and 34. These SNPs are located within or in close proximity of genes involved in bone formation and related through a joint network. The present study validated positional candidate genes within two previously known quantitative trait loci (QTL) and a novel QTL for CHD in German Shepherd Dogs.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0096618PLOS
January 2015

Multiple loci associated with canine hip dysplasia (CHD) in German shepherd dogs.

Mamm Genome 2014 Jun 2;25(5-6):262-9. Epub 2014 Apr 2.

Institute for Animal Breeding and Genetics, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Bünteweg 17p, 30559, Hannover, Germany.

Canine hip dysplasia (CHD) is the most common hereditary skeletal disorder in dogs. To identify common alleles associated with CHD, we developed 37 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 13 quantitative trait loci (QTL) previously identified for German shepherd dogs. These SNPs were genotyped in 95 German shepherd dogs affected by CHD and 95 breed, sex, and birth year-matched controls. A total of ten SNPs significant at a nominal P value of 0.05 were validated in 843 German shepherd dogs including 277 unaffected dogs and 566 CHD-affected dogs. Cases and controls were sampled from the whole German shepherd dog population in Germany in such a way that mean coancestry coefficients were below 0.1 % within cases and controls as well as among cases and controls. We identified nine SNPs significantly associated with CHD within five QTL on dog chromosomes (CFA) 3, 9, 26, 33, and 34. Genotype effects of these nine SNPs explained between 22 and 34 % of the phenotypic variance of hip dysplasia in German shepherd dogs. The strongest associated SNPs were located on CFA33 and 34 within the candidate genes PNCP, TRIO, and SLC6A3. Thus, the present study validated positional candidate genes within five QTL for CHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00335-014-9507-1DOI Listing
June 2014
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