Publications by authors named "Lei Tian"

729 Publications

Molecular mapping of quantitative trait loci for three husk traits using genotyping-by-sequencing in maize (Zea mays L.).

G3 (Bethesda) 2022 Aug 9. Epub 2022 Aug 9.

Cereal Crops Research Institute, Henan Academy of Agricultural Sciences/Henan Provincial Key Laboratory of Maize Biology, Zhengzhou 450003, China; (J.Z.); (F.Z.); (Y.D.); (J.Q.); (X.M.); (Z.M.).

The maize (Zea mays L.) husk consists of multiple leaf layers and plays an important role in grain growth and development. Despite significant achievements in physiological and morphological research, few studies have focused on the detection of genetic loci underlying husk-related traits due to the lack of efficient tools. In this study, we constructed an ultra-high-density linkage map using genotyping-by-sequence (GBS) based on a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population to estimate the genetic variance and heritability of three husk traits, i.e.,, husk width (HL), husk width (HW), and husk layer number (HN) in three field environments and the combined environment. The three husk traits showed broad phenotypic variation and high heritability, the broad-sense heritability (H2) was 0.92, 0.84 and 0.86, respectively. Twenty QTLs were consistently detected more than one environment; these viewed as stable QTLs include nine influence HL; six, HW; and five, HN. Based on the QTL mapping in the RIL population, qHL6 and qHN4 were detected across all environments and inferred to be reliable and major-effect QTLs for HL and HN, respectively. Additionally, several predicted candidate genes were identified in the region of qHL6 and qHN4, of which 17 candidate genes potentially play a role in biological processes related to development process and energy metabolism. These results will be as a useful resource for performing functional studies aimed at understanding the molecular pathways involved in husk growth and development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/g3journal/jkac198DOI Listing
August 2022

Autologous K63 deubiquitylation within the BRCA1-A complex licenses DNA damage recognition.

J Cell Biol 2022 Sep 8;221(9). Epub 2022 Aug 8.

Department of Cancer Biology, Penn Center for Genome Integrity, Basser Center for BRCA, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

The BRCA1-A complex contains matching lysine-63 ubiquitin (K63-Ub) binding and deubiquitylating activities. How these functionalities are coordinated to effectively respond to DNA damage remains unknown. We generated Brcc36 deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) inactive mice to address this gap in knowledge in a physiologic system. DUB inactivation impaired BRCA1-A complex damage localization and repair activities while causing early lethality when combined with Brca2 mutation. Damage response dysfunction in DUB-inactive cells corresponded to increased K63-Ub on RAP80 and BRCC36. Chemical cross-linking coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and cryogenic-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) analyses of isolated BRCA1-A complexes demonstrated the RAP80 ubiquitin interaction motifs are occupied by ubiquitin exclusively in the DUB-inactive complex, linking auto-inhibition by internal K63-Ub chains to loss of damage site ubiquitin recognition. These findings identify RAP80 and BRCC36 as autologous DUB substrates in the BRCA1-A complex, thus explaining the evolution of matching ubiquitin-binding and hydrolysis activities within a single macromolecular assembly.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.202111050DOI Listing
September 2022

Culturable Screening of Plant Growth-Promoting and Biocontrol Bacteria in the Rhizosphere and Phyllosphere of Wild Rice.

Microorganisms 2022 Jul 20;10(7). Epub 2022 Jul 20.

Key Laboratory of Mollisols Agroecology, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, China.

Wild rice is an important improved resource for cultivated rice and its unique ability to resist biotic and abiotic stress has attracted the attention of many scholars. The microbial community structure in the rhizosphere and leaf area of different rice varieties is also different, which may be one of the reasons for the difference in stress resistance between wild rice and cultivated rice. Forty-six bacteria were screened from the rhizosphere and phyllospheric of four different wild rice varieties. The results of functions of the screened strains showed that 18 strains had a good inhibitory effect on rice blast, and 33 strains had the ability to dissolve phosphorus, potassium, or fix nitrogen. Through potted experiment, the three bacterial strains, 499G2 (), 499G3 (), and 499G4 () have a positive effect on the growth of cultivated rice in addition to the resistance to rice blast. The contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, indole acetic acid (IAA), and chlorophyll in plant leaves were increased. In addition, in the verification test of rice blast infection, the application of inoculants can significantly reduce the content of malondialdehyde (MDA), increase the content of soluble sugar, and increase the activity of plant antioxidant enzymes, which may thereby improve rice in resisting to rice blast.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10071468DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9324538PMC
July 2022

Effects of allopurinol on renal function in patients with diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Ren Fail 2022 Dec;44(1):806-814

Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.

Background/objective: Diabetes mellitus is a common "non-gout" disease with high incidence. Several studies have shown that serum uric acid level in patients with diabetes is higher than that in healthy individuals, and is accompanied by severe albuminuria and high serum creatinine (Scr). Recent clinical studies have found that uric acid-lowering therapy (such as allopurinol) could reduce urinary albumin excretion rates (UAER) and Scr, increase eGFR, and thus reduce kidney damage in patients with diabetes. Therefore, this meta-analysis [PROSPERO CRD42021274465] intended to evaluate the efficacy and safety of allopurinol in patients with diabetes mellitus.

Methods: We thoroughly searched five electronic resource databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the efficacy and safety of allopurinol versus conventional treatment or placebo for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Predetermined outcomes were considered continuous variables, mean difference (MD) was used for the determination of effect size (standardized mean difference [SMD] was used to determine the effect size when there were different evaluation criteria in different articles), and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. All outcome measures were analyzed using a random-effects model for data analysis.

Results: Ten eligible trials with a total of 866 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Allopurinol was more effective in decreasing serum uric acid (SUA) levels compared with conventional treatment ( = 0.0001) or placebo ( < 0.00001). Moreover, the levels of 24-hour urine protein were significantly lower in the allopurinol group ( < 0.00001). The subgroup analysis of Scr showed that the Scr of patients with an allopurinol treatment duration of fewer than six months was significantly lower than that of the control group ( = 0.03). No significant difference in adverse events (AEs) was identified between the treatment and control groups.

Conclusions: Our meta-analysis of RCTs showed that oral administration of allopurinol effectively reduced SUA levels in patients with diabetes, and patients' renal function was protected. More RCTs with larger sample sizes and higher quality are needed to clarify the role of allopurinol use in decreasing blood pressure, maintaining blood glucose levels, and improving renal function in patients with diabetes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0886022X.2022.2068443DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9307109PMC
December 2022

Biochemical and structural characterization of a KTSC family single-stranded DNA-binding protein from Euryarchaea.

Int J Biol Macromol 2022 Jul 7;216:618-628. Epub 2022 Jul 7.

State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 West Beichen Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101, China. Electronic address:

The lysine (K) tRNA synthetase C-terminal (KTSC) domain containing proteins are widely spread in Bacteria, Archaea and Viruses, but the function of this short domain is unclear. The occurrence of the fusion of KTSC domain to a catalytic domain or domains related to DNA or RNA metabolisms suggests its potential role in DNA or RNA binding. Here, we report the characterization of Mvu8s from Methanolobus vulcani, which consists of a single KTSC domain. Mvu8s binds specifically to ssDNA with an affinity approximately 40- and 10-fold higher than those for dsDNA and ssRNA in vitro, respectively. It shows a slight preference to the G-rich DNA sequence but barely binds the A-stretch. Crystal structure of Mvu8s shows that it forms a homo-tetramer, with each monomer composed of a four-strand antiparallel β-sheet and a helix-turn-helix in the order of β1-β2-β3-α1-α2-β4. Four basic residues (R3, R7, K54 and K58) were found to serve important roles in ssDNA-binding. And, the spiral arrangement of the DNA interfaces in Mvu8s homo-tetramer presumably results in ssDNA wrapping. Our results not only offer clues of the functions of the KTSC domain containing proteins but also expand our knowledge on the non-oligonucleotide-binding (OB) fold single-stranded DNA-binding proteins in Archaea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2022.07.015DOI Listing
July 2022

Galectin-3 induces vascular smooth muscle cells calcification via AMPK/TXNIP pathway.

Aging (Albany NY) 2022 06 27;14(12):5086-5096. Epub 2022 Jun 27.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Galectin-3 plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Upregulation of VSMCs calcification is involved in the progression and development of vulnerable plaques. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) has been regarded as an important determinant in regulating inflammation and oxidative stress. In this study, we evaluated the role of TXNIP in galectin-3-induced vascular calcification. A primary culture of mouse VSMCs was established by enzymatic digestion of aorta. Small interfering (si) RNA was used to knock down the expression of target gene. VSMCs were treated with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or compound C respectively. Western blot was performed to detect the protein level in VSMCs, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Alizarin red staining was used to observe calcium deposition. Dihydroethidium (DHE) staining was used to observe the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Here we showed that galectin-3 increased aorta and VSMCs calcification, which was associated with AMPK/TXNIP upregulation and autophagy activation. TXNIP inhibition decreased galectin-3-induced aorta and VSMCs calcification and autophagy activation. 3-MA or Atg5 siRNA decreased galectin-3-induced upregulation of Runx2, BMP2 and OPN. AMPK mediated galectin-3-induced VSMCs osteogenic differentiation. These findings illustrated that TXNIP mediated galectin-3-induced vascular calcification, AMPK and autophagy activation were also associated with this process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/aging.204130DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9271303PMC
June 2022

Natural killer cell homing and trafficking in tissues and tumors: from biology to application.

Signal Transduct Target Ther 2022 06 29;7(1):205. Epub 2022 Jun 29.

Institute of Materia Medica, College of Pharmacy, Army Medical University, 400038, Chongqing, China.

Natural killer (NK) cells, a subgroup of innate lymphoid cells, act as the first line of defense against cancer. Although some evidence shows that NK cells can develop in secondary lymphoid tissues, NK cells develop mainly in the bone marrow (BM) and egress into the blood circulation when they mature. They then migrate to and settle down in peripheral tissues, though some special subsets home back into the BM or secondary lymphoid organs. Owing to its success in allogeneic adoptive transfer for cancer treatment and its "off-the-shelf" potential, NK cell-based immunotherapy is attracting increasing attention in the treatment of various cancers. However, insufficient infiltration of adoptively transferred NK cells limits clinical utility, especially for solid tumors. Expansion of NK cells or engineered chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) NK cells ex vivo prior to adoptive transfer by using various cytokines alters the profiles of chemokine receptors, which affects the infiltration of transferred NK cells into tumor tissue. Several factors control NK cell trafficking and homing, including cell-intrinsic factors (e.g., transcriptional factors), cell-extrinsic factors (e.g., integrins, selectins, chemokines and their corresponding receptors, signals induced by cytokines, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), etc.), and the cellular microenvironment. Here, we summarize the profiles and mechanisms of NK cell homing and trafficking at steady state and during tumor development, aiming to improve NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41392-022-01058-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9243142PMC
June 2022

KMT2D-NOTCH Mediates Coronary Abnormalities in Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome.

Circ Res 2022 Jul 28;131(3):280-282. Epub 2022 Jun 28.

Perinatal Institute, Division of Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (Z.Y., Z.L., V.P.-G., M.G., Y.M., M.G.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.122.320783DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9308708PMC
July 2022

Clinical application of 3D-printed PEEK implants for repairing mandibular defects.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2022 Jun 16. Epub 2022 Jun 16.

State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, 710032, PR China. Electronic address:

The aim of this study was to investigate and discuss the efficacy of 3D-printed PEEK implants in personalized reconstruction of mandibular segmental defects. This study was a single-center case series. Six patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction with a custom-made 3D-printed PEEK implant were enrolled. Patient demographics, photographs, computed tomography (CT), and other clinical data were collected and analyzed pre- and postoperatively. The average patient age was 60.0 ± 15.09 years. The mean operative time was 213.33 ± 30.77 min, and the postoperative follow-up time ranged from 10 to 24 months. Mandibular segmental defects ranged from the symphysis to the condyle. Five patients did not have any postoperative complications and were satisfied with the cosmetic and functional results. One patient had to undergo removal of the PEEK implant because of implant exposure at 10 months after surgery. PEEK implants can repair different forms of defect in the mandible, maintaining the original shape of the mandible, whilst not affecting mandible functions, such as mastication and temporomandibular joint movement. However, PEEK implantation requires the strict selection of appropriate indications, especially with regard to the evaluation of soft-tissue conditions in the implanted area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2022.06.002DOI Listing
June 2022

Regulation of LTP at rat hippocampal Schaffer-CA1 in vitro by musical rhythmic magnetic fields generated by red-pink (soothing) music tracks.

Int J Radiat Biol 2022 Jul 13:1-7. Epub 2022 Jul 13.

School of Life Sciences, Tiangong University, Tianjin, China.

Purpose: Music therapy, like red-pink (soothing) music, is an important treatment for neurological disorders associated with learning and memory. Magnetic fields have been proved to have a similar regulating effect. However, the effect of magnetic fields with musical rhythm generated by the combination of the two has not been confirmed. This study aimed to investigate the regulation of magnetic stimulation with music rhythm on LTP (long-term potentiation) of Schaffer-CA1.

Materials And Methods: This article selected three sorts of music tracks in different frequencies (music track (1) , music track (2) , music track (3) ) and four sorts of pure sinusoidal tracks of four different harmonic frequency (music track (4) the frequency is 3500 Hz; music track (5) the frequency is 2500 Hz; music track (6) the frequency is 1500 Hz; music track (7) the frequency is 500 Hz). These music tracks are converted into analog signals by the external sound card and power amplifier and fed into a homemade coil that meets the demand for this frequency bandwidth. The coil can generate seven sorts of time-varying magnetic fields with musical rhythm with a mean intensity of about 2 mT. We used multi-electrode array (MEA) to record the LTP signals of Schaffer-CA1 synaptic induced by seven sorts of musical rhythmic magnetic fields and analyze the regulation of them.

Results: The musical rhythmic magnetic fields generated by track 1 and track 2 have a remarkable enhancing effect on the amplitude of fEPSPs (field excitatory postsynaptic potentials) ( < .05), and these effects intensify with the increase of frequency. Nevertheless, there is no significant enhancing effect on LTP of the rhythmic magnetic field generated by track 3 ( > .05). The sinusoidal magnetic fields generated by track 4 and track 5 have an enhancing effect on the amplitude of fEPSPs ( < .05), and the enhancement is better than track 1 and track 2. The sinusoidal magnetic fields generated by track 6 and track 7 have an inhibiting effect ( < .05).

Conclusion: We found that the enhancing effect of musical rhythmic magnetic fields generated by track 1 was the most significant. The frequency of 1500 Hz could be a turning-point frequency in the regulation of magnetic field on LTP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09553002.2022.2094022DOI Listing
July 2022

TIR domains as two-tiered enzymes to activate plant immunity.

Authors:
Lei Tian Xin Li

Cell 2022 06;185(13):2208-2209

Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada; Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. Electronic address:

Plant immune receptors often contain TIR domains, which can oligomerize to form active enzyme complexes in response to pathogen infections. In this issue of Cell, Yu and colleagues discover that some plant TIR domains possess a novel 2',3'-cAMP/cGMP synthetase activity that cleaves double-stranded RNA/DNA, triggering cell death during plant immune responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2022.05.025DOI Listing
June 2022

Renal Protective Effects of Melatonin in Animal Models of Diabetes Mellitus-Related Kidney Damage: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Diabetes Res 2022 14;2022:3770417. Epub 2022 Jun 14.

Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100700, China.

Diabetic nephropathy (DN)-chronic kidney damage caused by hyperglycemia-eventually develops into end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Melatonin is a powerful antioxidant that has a wide range of biological activities. Potentially helpful effects of melatonin on diabetic kidney disease have been found in several studies. However, its protective mechanisms are not clear and remain to be explored. In this review (CRD42021285429), we conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the effects and relevant mechanisms of melatonin for diminishing renal injuries in diabetes mellitus models. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE databases up to September 2021 were used. Random- or fixed-effects models were used for calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) or 90% confidence interval (CI). The risk of bias was estimated using the SYRCLE's RoB tool. Statistical analysis was conducted with RevMan. A total of 15 studies including 224 animals were included in the analysis. The experimental group showed a remarkable decrease in serum creatinine ( = 0.002), blood urea nitrogen ( = 0.02), and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) ( < 0.00001) compared with the control group, while the oxidative stress index improved. The experimental group also showed a remarkable increase in superoxide dismutase ( = 0.21), glutathione ( < 0.0001), and catalase ( = 0.04) and a remarkable decrease in MDA ( < 0.00001) content compared with the control group. We concluded that melatonin plays a role in renal protection in diabetic animals by inhibiting oxidative stress. Moreover, it should be noted that fasting blood glucose was reduced in the experimental group compared with the control group. The kidney and body weights of the animals were not decreased in the diabetic animal model compared with the control group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2022/3770417DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9213184PMC
June 2022

Essentiality of core hydrophobicity to the structure and function of archaeal chromatin protein Cren7.

Int J Biol Macromol 2022 Aug 18;214:381-390. Epub 2022 Jun 18.

State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 West Beichen Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100101, China. Electronic address:

Studies on the structure-function relationship of protein greatly help to understand not only the principles of protein folding but also the rationales of protein engineering. Crenarchaeal chromatin protein Cren7 provides an excellent research model for this issue. The small protein adopts a 'β-barrel' fold, formed by the double-stranded antiparallel β-sheet 1 tightly packing with the triple-stranded antiparallel β-sheet 2. The simple structure of Cren7 is stabilized by the hydrophobic core between the β-sheets, consisting of the side chains of V8, V10, L20, V25, F41 and F50. In the present work, mutation analyses by alanine substitution of each of the residues in the hydrophobic core were performed. Circular dichroism spectra and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses showed that mutation of F41 led to a significant misfolding of Cren7 through disruption of the β-sheets. Meanwhile, the mutant F41A showed a reduced thermostatility (Tm of 53.2 °C), as compared with the wild-type Cren7 (Tm > 80 °C). Biolayer interferometry and nick-closure assays showed the largely unchanged activities in DNA binding and supercoiling of F41A, indicating the DNA interface of Cren7 was generally retained in F41A. However, F41A was unable to mediate DNA bridging, probably due to the impairment in forming oligomers/polymers on DNA. Atomic force microscopic images of the F41A-DNA complexes also revealed that F41A nearly completely lost the ability to compact DNA into highly condensed structures. Our results not only reveal the critical role of F41 in protein folding of Cren7 but also provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of thermostable proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2022.06.114DOI Listing
August 2022

Publisher Correction: ILC1s control leukemia stem cell fate and limit development of AML.

Nat Immunol 2022 Aug;23(8):1286

Department of Hematology & Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41590-022-01265-4DOI Listing
August 2022

Effects of exogenous cellulose-degrading bacteria on humus formation and bacterial community stability during composting.

Bioresour Technol 2022 Sep 11;359:127458. Epub 2022 Jun 11.

Key Laboratory of Mollisols Agroecology, Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, Jilin, China. Electronic address:

This study aimed to reveal the potential mechanism of influence exogenous cellulose-degrading bacteria (ECDB) exerted on humus synthesis during the co-composting of corn straw and cattle manure. By measuring the changes in physicochemical factors and bacterial communities, it was revealed that inoculation with ECDB enhanced the driving force of cellulose degradation and humus synthesis. ECDB not only directly participated in cellulose degradation as degrading bacteria, but also changed the bacterial community succession, and increased the abundance of bacterial communities associated with cellulose degradation. The results showed that ECDB stimulated the potential functions and interactions of bacterial communities. Structural equation modeling confirmed that ECDB acted mainly as a bioactivator to promote humus formation in co-composting of corn straw and cattle manure. Taken together, these findings offered new strategies which can be effectively utilized to increase the efficiency and quality of corn straw composting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2022.127458DOI Listing
September 2022

Occurrence of legacy and replacement plasticizers, bisphenols, and flame retardants in potable water in Montreal and South Africa.

Sci Total Environ 2022 Sep 11;840:156581. Epub 2022 Jun 11.

Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address:

The occurrence of thirty-nine contaminants including plasticizers, bisphenols, and flame retardants in potable water from Montreal and South Africa was analyzed to determine their presence and concentrations in different water sources. In Montreal, five bottled water (BW) brands and three drinking water treatment plants (DWTP) were included. In South Africa, water was sampled from one urban DWTP located in Pretoria, Gauteng, and one rural DWTP located in Vhembe, along with water from the same rural DWTP which had been stored in small and large plastic containers. A combination of legacy compounds, typically with proven toxic effects, and replacement compounds was investigated. Bisphenols, Dechlorane-602, Dechlorane-603, and s-dechlorane plus (s-DP) were not detected in any water samples, and a-dechlorane plus (a-DP) was only detected in one sample from Pretoria at a concentration of 1.09 ng/L. Lower brominated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE)s were detected more frequently than higher brominated PBDEs, always at low concentrations of <2 ng/L, and total PBDE levels were statistically higher in South Africa than in Montreal. Replacement flame retardants, organophosphate esters (OPEs), were detected at statistically higher concentrations in Montreal's BW (68.56 ng/L), drinking water (DW) (421.45 ng/L) and Vhembe (198.33 ng/L) than legacy PBDEs. Total OPE concentrations did not demonstrate any geographical trend; however, levels were statistically higher in Montreal's DW than Montreal's BW. Plasticizers were frequently detected in all samples, with legacy compounds DEHP, DBP, and replacement DINCH being detected in 100 % of samples with average concentrations ranging from 6.89 ng/L for DEHP in Pretoria to 175.04 ng/L for DINCH in Montreal's DW. Total plasticizer concentrations were higher in Montreal than in South Africa. The replacement plasticizers (DINCH, DINP, DIDA, and DEHA) were detected at similar frequencies and concentrations as legacy plasticizers (DEHP, DEP, DBP, MEHP). For the compounds reported in earlier studies, the concentrations detected in the present study were similar to other locations. These compounds are not currently regulated in drinking water but their frequent detection, especially OPEs and plasticizers, and the presence of replacement compounds at similar or higher levels than their legacy compounds demonstrate the importance of further investigating the prevalence and the ecological or human health effects of these compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2022.156581DOI Listing
September 2022

Predictive Value of Galectin-3 and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity for Coronary Artery Calcification in Coronary Arteriography Patients.

Int J Clin Pract 2022 16;2022:1865736. Epub 2022 May 16.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Objectives: To study the predictive value for coronary artery calcification (CAC) of plasma galectin-3 and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV) in coronary arteriography (CAG) patients.

Methods: Patients who received coronary arteriography (CAG) examination were recruited. The level of plasma galectin-3 was measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The arterial stiffness was analyzed by BaPWV and ankle-brachial index (ABI) which were measured using a volume-plethysmographic device. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the prognostic value of galectin-3 or BaPWV for coronary artery calcification (CAC).

Results: The level of galectin-3 and BaPWV was significantly higher in CAC patients compared with that in control ( < 0.01). The level of plasma galectin-3 was positively correlated with BaPWV ( = -0.296, < 0.01) and negatively correlated with ABI ( = -0.296, < 0.01). ROC curve analysis revealed that galectin-3 ≥5.90 ng/ml was the most powerful predictor for CAC with sensitivity of 85.5% and specificity of 83.5%. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.916. When the level of BaPWV was more than 1909 m/s, the sensitivity and specificity were 61.8% and 69.6%, respectively, for predicting CAC. The AUC was 0.646.

Conclusions: The level of plasma galectin-3 increases significantly in CAC patients compared to control, and its level is related to BaPWV and ABI. Galectin-3 and BaPWV can be used to predict CAC, and the diagnosis value (sensitivity and specificity) of galectin-3 for CAC is better than that of BaPWV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2022/1865736DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9159218PMC
June 2022

Impacts of Spatial Components on Outdoor Thermal Comfort in Traditional Linpan Settlements.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2022 05 25;19(11). Epub 2022 May 25.

Civil and Infrastructure Engineering Discipline, School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia.

Traditional settlements have received increasing attention because of China's rural revitalization. Traditional settlements with excellent thermal comfort in rural areas can attract urban residents, so it is vital to explore the thermal comfort of traditional settlements. For this paper, we studied Linpan settlements, which are scattered traditional settlements that are mainly composed of buildings and trees. Firstly, we visually interpreted Linpan settlements by ArcGIS. A total of 1194 Linpan settlements were classified to obtain the spatial components. The statistical results of Linpan were used in the subsequent experimental design. Then ENVI-met was used to simulate 25 different spatial forms of Linpan obtained by statistical results and orthogonal experiment to explore the most comfortable Linpan layout. The results showed the following: (1) Linpan could improve thermal comfort in both winter and summer. Adjusting the spatial arrangement could maximally increase the mean physiological equivalent temperature (PET) of the whole Linpan area by 1.03 °C in winter and reduce it by 3.02 °C in the summer. (2) At different time points, the influence of different space factors on thermal comfort was also different. The overall significance of each factor on thermal comfort was addressed as follows: vegetation coverage (highly significant) > building number (highly significant) > building form (highly significant) > vegetation distribution (significant), but the building distribution was not significant. (3) The best spatial arrangement scheme was high vegetation coverage, a large number of buildings, tri-courtyard buildings, surrounding vegetation distribution, and surrounding building distribution. The innovation of this paper lies in introduced thermal comfort into the traditional Linpan settlement, extracted spatial features of buildings and vegetation by visual interpretation combined with GIS software, and the fact that we conducted the experimental design of microclimate and thermal comfort based on spatial features. The research results can guide the outdoor thermal environment renewal design of Linpan and other traditional settlements.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116421DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9179965PMC
May 2022

Protection Against Post-resuscitation Acute Kidney Injury by N-Acetylcysteine via Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway.

Front Med (Lausanne) 2022 17;9:848491. Epub 2022 May 17.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China.

Background And Objective: Acute kidney injury (AKI), the common complication after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), seriously affects the prognosis of cardiac arrest (CA) patients. However, there are limited studies on post-resuscitation AKI. In addition, it has been demonstrated that N-acetylcysteine (N-AC) as an ROS scavenger, has multiorgan-protective effects on systemic and regional ischaemia-reperfusion injuries. However, no studies have reported its protective effects against post-resuscitation AKI and potential mechanisms. This study aimed to clarify the protective effects of N-AC on post-resuscitation AKI and investigate whether its potential mechanism was mediated by activating Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway in the kidney.

Methods: We established cardiac arrest models in rats. All animals were divided into four groups: the sham, control, N-AC, and ZnPP groups. Animals in each group except for the ZnPP group were assigned into two subgroups based on the survival time: 6 and 48 h. The rats in the control, N-AC, and ZnPP groups underwent induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF), 8 min untreated VF and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Renal function indicators, were detected using commercial kits. Renal pathologic changes were assessed by haematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory responses were measured using the corresponding indicators. Apoptosis was evaluated using terminal uridine nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and expression of proteins associated with apoptosis and the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway was measured by western blotting.

Results: N-AC inhibited post-resuscitation AKI. We observed that N-AC reduced the levels of biomarkers of renal function derangement; improved renal pathological changes; and suppressed apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response. Additionally, the production of ROS in the kidneys markedly decreased by N-AC. More importantly, compared with the control group, N-AC further upregulated the expression of nuclear Nrf2 and endogenous HO-1 in N-AC group. However, N-AC-determined protective effects on post-resuscitation AKI were markedly reversed after pretreatment of the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP).

Conclusions: N-AC alleviated renal dysfunction and prolonged survival in animal models of CA. N-AC partially exerts beneficial renal protection via activation of the Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway. Altogether, all these findings indicated that N-AC as a common clinical agent, may have the potentially clinical utility to improve patients the outcomes in cardiac arrest.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2022.848491DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9152005PMC
May 2022

Differences of Corneal Biomechanics Among Thin Normal Cornea, Forme-Fruste Keratoconus, and Cornea After SMILE.

Front Bioeng Biotechnol 2022 13;10:861924. Epub 2022 May 13.

School of Biomedical Engineering, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

To compare the corneal biomechanics of thin normal cornea (TNC) with thinnest corneal thickness (TCT) (≤500 µm), forme-fruste keratoconus (FFKC) and cornea after small incision lenticule extraction (Post-SMILE) had their central corneal thickness (CCT) matched by Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology (Corvis ST). CCT were matched in 23 eyes with FFKC, 23 eyes by SMILE in 3 months post-operatively, and 23 TNC eyes. The differences in corneal biomechanics by Corvis ST among the three groups were compared. There was no significant difference in CCT among the three groups, and the biomechanically corrected intraocular pressure (bIOP) did not differ significantly among the three groups (all > 0.05). There were significant differences in most DCR parameters between pre- and post-operatively (all < 0.05). Compared with TNC, the values of corneal deflection amplitude during the first applanation (A1DA), length at the first applanation (A1L), corneal deflection amplitude during the second applanation (A2DA), and maximum deformation amplitude (DA) decreased in 3 months after SMILE (all < 0.05), these values increased in the FFKC (all < 0.05). The majority of the DCR parameters were different among the three groups. The parameters A1DA, A1L, A2DA, and DA may be different between TNC and Post-SMILE, TNC and FFKC, and Post-SMILE and FFKC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fbioe.2022.861924DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9136087PMC
May 2022

Ambient ozone exposure induces ROS related-mitophagy and pyroptosis via NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rat lung cells.

Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 2022 Jul 26;240:113663. Epub 2022 May 26.

Tianjin Institute of Environmental and Operational Medicine, No. 1 Dali Road, Heping District, Tianjin 300050, China. Electronic address:

Objective: To study the regulatory relationship between ozone-induced mitophagy and pyroptosis in lung epithelial cells.

Results: First, type I primary alveolar epithelial cells and male Wistar rats were treated with ozone at different dosages. The ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential significantly decreased in type I primary alveolar epithelial cells. The mitophagy-related markers and PINK1/Parkin pathway-related proteins, and the co-localization of LC3, Parkin, and mitochondria in type I alveolar epithelial cells indicated that ozone exposure triggered mitophagy. On the other hand, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor NAC could significantly alleviate mitophagy in epithelial cells. After treatment with the mitophagy inhibitor MDIVI-1, the levels of the NLRP3 inflammasome, cleaved caspase-1, and N-gasdermin D (N-GSDMD) significantly decreased in the cells. Altogether, these results indicated that mitophagy can be triggered by ozone exposure, and subsequently induces cell death mediated by the NLRP3 inflammasome. Finally, the overexpression and knockdown of NLRP3 confirmed this conclusion.

Conclusion: Ozone exposure induced oxidative damage, leading to mitochondrial structural and functional damage. Ozone-induced ROS triggered mitophagy through the activation of the PINK1/Parkin signaling pathway, then pyroptosis through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2022.113663DOI Listing
July 2022

Trends in DTR, CR, ECR, and FQR in Four Common Gram-Negative Bacteria: A Retrospective Study from 2013 to 2021.

Authors:
Zhen Zhang Lei Tian

Infect Drug Resist 2022 23;15:2625-2631. Epub 2022 May 23.

Department of Clinical Laboratory, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei Province, People's Republic of China.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of four important drug-resistance phenotypes: difficult-to-treat resistance (DTR), fluoroquinolone resistance (FQR), carbapenem resistance (CR), and extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistance (ECR).

Methods: DTR was defined as insensitivity to all the β-lactams and fluoroquinolones tested. We retrospectively analyzed the distribution characteristics of specific drug-resistant phenotypes of the main Gram-negative bacteria causing bloodstream infections (BSIs) in Tongji Hospital (Wuhan, China) between 2013 and 2021: , and .

Results: FQR was the main antimicrobial resistance phenotype of , accounting for 59.45% (1117/1879, 95% confidence interval, 57.21%-61.65%); the detection rates for CR and DTR were low, accounting for 1.86% (35/1879, 1.34%-2.58%), and 1.81% (34/1879, 1.30%-2.52%), respectively. However, the detection rates for CR and DTR in were 38.83% (497/1280, 36.20%-41.53%) and 35.94% (460/1280, 33.35%-38.60%), respectively. In , the detection rates of the four drug-resistant phenotypes (DTR, CR, FQR, and ECR) were all < 30%, but conversely, for , the detection rates were all > 80%. The changes in the data from 2013 to 2021 showed upward trends (z > 0) for CR-, DTR-, FQR-, CR-, DTR-, FQR-, and ECR-, but downward trends (z < 0) for ECR-, CR-, DTR-, FQR-, ECR-, CR-, DTR-, FQR-, and ECR-.

Conclusion: DTR warrants further attention, especially in in BSI-associated and , in which the detection rates were very high. Between 2013 and 2021 in this region, DTR- and CR- showed obvious upward trends, whereas DTR- and ECR- showed obvious downward trends.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S365139DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9139338PMC
May 2022

A Comparative Study on Relieving Exercise-Induced Fatigue by Inhalation of Different Citrus Essential Oils.

Molecules 2022 May 18;27(10). Epub 2022 May 18.

College of Food Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China.

Citrus essential oils (CEOs) possess physiological functions due to diverse aroma components. However, evidence for the effects of CEOs on exercise performance and exercise-induced fatigue is limited. The CEOs with discrepancies in components may exert different effects on the amelioration of exercise-induced fatigue. In this study, sweet orange ( L.) essential oil (SEO), lemon () essential oil (LEO), and bergamot () essential oil (BEO) were chosen to explore the effect on amelioration of exercise-induced fatigue. Our results demonstrated that SEO and LEO increased the swimming time by 276% and 46.5%, while BEO did not. Moreover, the three CEOs exerted varying effects on mitigating exercise-induced fatigue via inhibiting oxidative stress, protecting muscle injury, and promoting glucose-dependent energy supply. Accordingly, BEO showed the best efficiency. Moreover, the GC-MS and Pearson correlation analysis of BEO showed that the contents of the major components, such as (±)-limonene (32.9%), linalyl butyrate (17.8%), and linalool (7.7%), were significantly positively correlated with relieving exercise-induced fatigue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules27103239DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9145370PMC
May 2022

Ethanolic Extract from Alleviates DSS-Induced Intestinal Inflammation and Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction by Inhibiting the TLR4/NF-κB Pathway and Regulating Tight Junction Proteins.

Molecules 2022 May 11;27(10). Epub 2022 May 11.

Faculty of Food Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China.

The aim of the research was to determine the protective effect and mechanism of J. Agardh extract (PWE) on DSS-induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in mice. In this research, PWE is rich in flavonoids and diterpenoids by UPLC-MS/MS analysis. In LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells, PWE reduced the productions of inflammatory factors (i.e., NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In DSS-induced UC in mice, PWE improved disease activity index (DAI) score, attenuated oxidative stress by decreasing MPO and MDA activities and activating GSH and SOD levels, and inhibited TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β expressions in the colonic tissues. PWE also improved the intestinal barrier by upregulating the expressions of tight junction proteins, including occludin and ZO-1. Moreover, PWE extract alleviated intestinal inflammation by suppressing the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway. Conclusion: PWE can alleviate DSS-induced UC in mice by increasing the expressions of intestinal tight junction proteins and inhibiting the TLR4/NF-κB inflammatory pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules27103093DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9146006PMC
May 2022

Changes in gap junction proteins Connexin30.2 and Connexin40 expression in the sinoatrial node of rats with dexmedetomidine-induced sinus bradycardia.

Braz J Anesthesiol 2022 May 23. Epub 2022 May 23.

Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, China.

Background: Dexmedetomidine (Dex) is widely used, and its most common side effect is bradycardia. The complete mechanism through which Dex induces bradycardia has not been elucidated. This research investigates the expression of gap junction proteins Connexin30.2 (Cx30.2) and Connexin40 (Cx40) within the sinoatrial node of rats with Dex-induced sinus bradycardia.

Methods: Eighty rats were randomly assigned to five groups. Saline was administered to rats in Group C. In the other four groups, the rats were administered Dex to induce bradycardia. In groups D and D, the rats were administered Dex at a loading dose of 30 μg.kg and 100 μg.kg for 10 min, then at 15 μg.kg.h and 50 μg.kg.h for 120 min separately. The rats in group DA and DA were administered Dex in the same way as in group D and D; however, immediately after the administration of the loading dose, 0.5 mg atropine was administered intravenously, and then at 0.5 mg.kg.h for 120 min. The sinoatrial node was acquired after intravenous infusion was completed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were performed to measure mRNA and protein expression of Cx30.2 and Cx40, respectively.

Results: The expression of Cx30.2 increased, whereas the expression of Cx40 decreased within the sinoatrial node of rats with Dex-induced sinus bradycardia. Atropine reversed the effects of Dex on the expression of gap junction proteins.

Conclusion: Dex possibly altered the expression of gap junction proteins to slow down cardiac conduction velocity in the sinoatrial node.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjane.2022.05.004DOI Listing
May 2022

[Corrigendum] miR‑23a suppresses pancreatic cancer cell progression by inhibiting PLK‑1 expression.

Mol Med Rep 2022 Jul 18;26(1). Epub 2022 May 18.

The Pancreas Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210029, P.R. China.

Subsequently to the publication of this paper, the authors have realized that they made an error during the sorting of the data panels shown for the migration and invasion assays shown in Fig. 2C; essentially, the 'Invasion/PLL3.7' panel was chosen from the same original data source as the panel selected to represent the 'Migration/Inhibitor‑NC' experiment. The authors have consulted their original data, and realize that the 'Invasion/PLL3.7' data panel was inadvertently selected incorrectly for Fig. 2. The revised version of Fig. 2, showing the data appropriate for the 'Invasion/PLL3.7' experiment, is shown on the next page. Note that the errors made in assembling Fig. 2 did not significantly affect either the results or the conclusions reported in this paper, and all the authors agree to this Corrigendum. The authors are grateful to the Editor of for allowing them the opportunity to publish this corrigendum, and apologize to the readership for any inconvenience caused.[Molecular Medicine Reports 18: 105‑112, 2018; DOI: 10.3892/mmr.2018.8941].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2022.12738DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9175276PMC
July 2022

Off-the-shelf CAR natural killer cells secreting IL-15 target spike in treating COVID-19.

Nat Commun 2022 05 11;13(1):2576. Epub 2022 May 11.

Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, 91010, USA.

Engineered natural killer (NK) cells represent a promising option for immune therapy option due to their immediate availability in allogeneic settings. Severe acute diseases, such as COVID-19, require targeted and immediate intervention. Here we show engineering of NK cells to express (1) soluble interleukin-15 (sIL15) for enhancing their survival and (2) a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) consisting of an extracellular domain of ACE2, targeting the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. These CAR NK cells (mACE2-CAR_sIL15 NK cells) bind to VSV-SARS-CoV-2 chimeric viral particles as well as the recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike protein subunit S1 leading to enhanced NK cell production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and increased in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity against cells expressing the spike protein. Administration of mACE2-CAR_sIL15 NK cells maintains body weight, reduces viral load, and prolongs survival of transgenic mice expressing human ACE2 upon infection with live SARS-CoV-2. These experiments, and the capacity of mACE2-CAR_sIL15 NK cells to retain their activity following cryopreservation, demonstrate their potential as an allogeneic off-the-shelf therapy for COVID-19 patients who are faced with limited treatment options.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-022-30216-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9095674PMC
May 2022

Targeting Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 for the Treatment of Hematological Malignancies and Solid Tumors: Candidate Structure-Activity Relationships Insights and Evolution Prospects.

J Med Chem 2022 05 7;65(10):7016-7043. Epub 2022 May 7.

Faculty of Pharmacy, Shaanxi University of Science & Technology, Xi'an 710021, P. R. China.

Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a histone methyltransferase that can change the expression of downstream target genes by catalyzing the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3). Studies have found that EZH2 is highly expressed in a variety of tumor tissues and is closely related to the occurrence, development, invasion, and metastasis of tumors; therefore, EZH2 is becoming a new molecular target in antitumor therapy. Tazemetostat (EPZ-6438) was approved in 2020 as the first inhibitor targeting catalytic EZH2 for the treatment of epithelioid sarcoma. In addition, a variety of EZH2 inhibitors are being investigated in basic and clinical research for the treatment of tumors, and encouraging results have been obtained. This article systematically reviews the research progress on EZH2 inhibitors and proteolysis targeting chimera (PROTAC)-based EZH2 degradation agents with a focus on their design strategies, structure-activity relationships (SARs), and safety and clinical manifestations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.2c00047DOI Listing
May 2022

Lactiplantibacillus plantarum J-15 reduced calcium oxalate kidney stones by regulating intestinal microbiota, metabolism, and inflammation in rats.

FASEB J 2022 06;36(6):e22340

Key Laboratory of Bio-Resource and Eco-Environment of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

The prevention role of Lactiplantibacillus plantarum against the formation of kidney stones has been increasingly recognized; its mechanism, however, has mainly been focused on inhibiting the inflammation in the colon in the gastrointestinal (GI) system, and the intestinal metabolites from microflora have not been revealed fully with regarding to the stone formation. In this study, we investigated the effect of L. plantarum J-15 on kidney stone formation in renal calcium oxalate (CaOx) rats induced by ethylene glycol and monitored the changes of intestinal microflora and their metabolites detected by 16S rRNA sequencing and widely targeted analysis, followed by the evaluation of the intestinal barrier function and inflammation levels in the colon, blood and kidney. The results showed that L. plantarum J-15 effectively reduced renal crystallization and urinary oxalic acid. Ten microbial genera, including anti-inflammatory and SCFAs-related Faecalibaculum, were enriched in the J-15 treatment group. There are 136 metabolites from 11 categories significantly different in the J-15 supplementation group compared with CaOx model rats, most of which were enriched in the amino acid metabolic and secondary bile acid pathways. The expression of intestinal tight junction protein Occludin and the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin were decreased in the intestine, which further reduced the translocated lipopolysaccharide and inflammation levels in the blood upon J-15 treatment. Thus, the inflammation and injury in the kidney might be alleviated by downregulating TLR4/NF-κB/COX-2 signaling pathway. It suggested that L. plantarum J-15 might reduce kidney stone formation by restoring intestinal microflora and metabolic disorder, protecting intestinal barrier function, and alleviating inflammation. This finding provides new insights into the therapies for renal stones.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1096/fj.202101972RRDOI Listing
June 2022

Predictive value of postoperative serum prealbumin levels for early detection of anastomotic leak after esophagectomy: A retrospective study.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2022 Apr 29;101(17):e29201. Epub 2022 Apr 29.

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.

Abstract: The impact of serum prealbumin in patients with esophageal carcinoma after undergoing esophagectomy remains unclear, we speculated that serum prealbumin is associated with anastomotic leak (AL) after surgery, low serum prealbumin level may lead to AL. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between serum prealbumin levels and AL after esophagectomy, to explore the value of serum prealbumin as an early predictor of AL after esophagectomy.Between January 2014 and December 2018, 255 patients were enrolled in this study, their basic characteristics and perioperative serum prealbumin levels were retrospectively analyzed. Statistical analysis by t test, nonparametric test and logistic regression were used to analyze data for patients with and without AL. Based on a receiver operator characteristic curve, a cut-off value for serum prealbumin levels as a predictor of AL was determined.Among the 255 patients, 18 patients were diagnosed with AL. The overall AL rate was 7.0% (18/255) including 12 cases of intrathoracic AL and 6 cases of cervical AL. By univariate analysis, we identified postoperative serum prealbumin level as a risk factor for AL (P < .001). Multivariate analysis also demonstrated postoperative serum prealbumin level (P = .028) to be an independent risk factor for AL. The best cut-off value of postoperative serum prealbumin level was 131 mg/L for predicting AL, with 83.3% sensitivity and 72.2% specificity.Postoperative serum prealbumin level was significantly associated with AL. it may help the early prediction of postoperative AL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000029201DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9276443PMC
April 2022
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