Publications by authors named "Lee-Fen Yu"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Clinical and prognostic implications of Roundabout 4 (robo4) in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

PLoS One 2015 20;10(3):e0119831. Epub 2015 Mar 20.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Background: Robo4 is involved in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell homeostasis and essential for tumor angiogenesis. Expression of Robo4 was recently found in solid tumors and leukemia stem cells. However, the clinical implications of Robo4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unclear.

Methods: We investigated the clinical and prognostic relevance of mRNA expression of Robo4 in bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cells from 218 adult patients with de novo AML. We also performed immunohistochemical staining to assess the Robo4 protein expression in the BM biopsy specimens from 30 selected AML patients in the cohort.

Results: Higher Robo4 expression was closely associated with lower white blood cell counts, expression of HLA-DR, CD13, CD34 and CD56 on leukemia cells, t(8;21) and ASXL1 mutation, but negatively correlated with t(15;17) and CEBPA mutation. Compared to patients with lower Robo4 expression, those with higher expression had significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). This result was confirmed in an independent validation cohort. Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that higher Robo4 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor for DFS and OS in total cohort and patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics, irrespective of age, WBC count, karyotype, and mutation status of NPM1/FLT3-ITD, and CEBPA.

Conclusions: BM Robo4 expression can serve as a new biomarker to predict clinical outcomes in AML patients and Robo4 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in patients with higher Robo4 expression.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0119831PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4368775PMC
February 2016

The N-terminal CEBPA mutant in acute myeloid leukemia impairs CXCR4 expression.

Haematologica 2014 Dec 5;99(12):1799-807. Epub 2014 Sep 5.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei;

CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is an essential regulator for homing and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells within the bone marrow niches. Analysis of clinical implications of bone marrow CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia showed not only higher CXCR4 expression was an independent poor prognostic factor, irrespective of age, white blood cell counts, cytogenetics, and mutation status of NPM1/FLT3-ITD and CEBPA, but also showed CXCR4 expression was inversely associated with mutations of CEBPA, a gene encoding transcription factor C/EBPα. Patients with wild-type CEBPA had significantly higher CXCR4 expression than those with mutated CEBPA. We hypothesized that CEBPA might influence the expression of CXCR4. To test this hypothesis, we first examined endogenous CXCR4 expression in 293T and K562 cells over-expressing wild-type C/EBPα p42 and demonstrated that CXCR4 levels were increased in these cells, whilst the expression of the N-terminal mutant, C/EBPα p30, diminished CXCR4 transcription. We further showed p42 was bound to the CXCR4 promoter by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Induction of p42 in the inducible K562-C/EBPα cell lines increased the chemotactic migration. Moreover, decreased expression of C/EBPα by RNA interference decreased levels of CXCR4 protein expression in U937 cells, thereby abrogating CXCR4-mediated chemotaxis. Our results provide, for the first time, evidence that C/EBPα indeed regulates the activation of CXCR4, which is critical for the homing and engraftment of acute myeloid leukemia cells, while p30 mutant impairs CXCR4 expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2014.107821DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4258761PMC
December 2014

IPSS-R in 555 Taiwanese patients with primary MDS: Integration of monosomal karyotype can better risk-stratify the patients.

Am J Hematol 2014 Sep 19;89(9):E142-9. Epub 2014 Jun 19.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch, Taiwan.

The revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) was recently developed to better assess the clinical outcome of adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this study, we aimed to investigate the prognostic impact of this new risk model on 555 MDS patients in Taiwan. Generally, the IPSS-R could discriminate MDS patients regarding risk of leukemia evolution and overall survival in our cohort and it further refined prognostic stratification in all IPSS risk categories. However, we could not find the inter-group difference between IPSS-R very low and low risk subgroups in both leukemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS). IPSS-R couldn't distinguish the prognosis between very good and good and between good and intermediate risk cytogenetic categories in OS, and between very good and good and between intermediate and poor cytogenetic-risk categories in LFS, either. On the other hand, incorporation of monosomal karyotype (MK) into IPSS-R could further stratify MDS patients with higher-risk IPSS-R (intermediate, high and very high risk) into four groups, rather than three groups, with different OS (P < 0.001). Intriguingly, patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation had longer survival than those without in the IPSS-R high and very high, but not other risk groups. Similarly, patients treated with hypomethylating agents had better survival than those not in the IPSS-R very high risk group. In conclusion, IPSS-R can risk-stratify MDS patients in Taiwan but with some limitations, especially in very low risk category, and MK has additional prognostic value in discriminating MDS patients with higher-risk IPSS-R.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.23765DOI Listing
September 2014

SF3B1 mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: the mutation is stable during disease evolution.

Am J Hematol 2014 Aug 28;89(8):E109-15. Epub 2014 Apr 28.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

The SF3B1 mutation can be detected in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but the report regarding the association of this mutation with other genetic alterations and its stability during disease progression is limited. In this study, SF3B1 mutations were identified in 10% of total cohort of 479 MDS patients and 61.8% of 34 patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). SF3B1 mutations were closely associated with older age, higher platelet counts, lower lactate dehydrogenase levels, good-risk cytogenetics, and mutations of DNMT3A, but inversely related to ASXL1 mutations. Most SF3B1-mutated patients had concurrent other genetic alterations, including DNMT3A and RUNX1 mutations. There was no prognostic difference between patients with SF3B1 mutations and those without. Sequential studies in 417 samples from 142 patients demonstrated that all SF3B1-mutated patients retained the same mutations during disease evolution with the exception of two patients who lost the mutation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, whereas none of the SF3B1-wild patients acquired a novel mutation during clinical follow-ups. In conclusion, the patients with SF3B1 mutations had distinct clinic-biologic features. SF3B1 mutations, accompanied with other genetic alterations, especially DNMT3A mutations, may play a role in the development of MDS, but have little role in disease progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.23734DOI Listing
August 2014

The anxiolytic effect of aromatherapy on patients awaiting ambulatory surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2013 17;2013:927419. Epub 2013 Dec 17.

Center for Evidence-Based Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan ; Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan ; Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11696, Taiwan ; Evidence-Based Medicine Center, Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11696, Taiwan.

The aim of this study was to determine if aromatherapy could reduce preoperative anxiety in ambulatory surgery patients. A total of 109 preoperative patients were randomly assigned to experimental (bergamot essential oil) and control (water vapor) conditions and their responses to the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and vital signs were monitored. Patients were stratified by previous surgical experience, but that did not influence the results. All those exposed to bergamot essential oil aromatherapy showed a greater reduction in preoperative anxiety than those in the control groups. Aromatherapy may be a useful part of a holistic approach to reducing preoperative anxiety before ambulatory surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/927419DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3877597PMC
January 2014

Clinical implications of the SETBP1 mutation in patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome and its stability during disease progression.

Am J Hematol 2014 Feb 20;89(2):181-6. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Mutations of the SET binding protein 1 (SETBP1) gene have been identified in patients with myeloid neoplasms, but the clinical relevance of this mutation and its association with other gene mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and the stability during disease progression remains unclear. Mutations in SETBP1 gene at exon 4 were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing in 430 MDS patients. The results were correlated with clinical features, cytogenetics, gene mutations and treatment outcomes. SETBP1 mutations were identified in 14 (3.3%) of the 430 patients with primary MDS based on the FAB classification and 8 (2.4%) of the 333 patients based on the WHO classification. The SETBP1 mutation was closely associated with higher white blood cell counts, isochromosome of 17q, monosomy 7, and mutations of ASXL1, EZH2 and SRSF2. With a median follow-up of 43.9 months, MDS patients, based on either the FAB or WHO classification, had a significantly poorer overall survival (OS) if they harbored SETBP1 mutation. Further, SETBP1 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for OS (HR = 1.842, CI 95%, 1.1018-3.332, P = 0.043) irrespective of age, sex, and the International Prognostic Scoring System. Sequential analysis showed that the original SETBP1 mutations in the eight SETBP1-mutated patients studied were retained while two of the 101 SETBP1-wild patients acquired novel SETBP1 mutations during follow-ups. The SETBP1 mutation is associated with poor prognosis in MDS. The mutation can be acquired during the clinical course suggesting it may play a role in disease progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.23611DOI Listing
February 2014

IDH mutations are closely associated with mutations of DNMT3A, ASXL1 and SRSF2 in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and are stable during disease evolution.

Am J Hematol 2014 Feb 20;89(2):137-44. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Current information about clinical significance of IDH mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), their association with other genetic alterations and the stability during disease progression is limited. In this study, IDH mutations were identified in 4.6% of 477 patients with MDS based on the FAB classification and in 2.2 % of 368 patients based on the 2008 WHO classification. IDH mutations were closely associated with older age, higher platelet counts, and mutations of DNMT3A (36.4% vs. 8.7%, P < 0.001), ASXL1 (47.6% vs. 22.0%, P = 0.007), and SRSF2 (45.5% vs. 11.8%, P < 0.001). IDH2 mutation was a poor prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with lower-risk MDS, based on international prognosis scoring system (IPSS), FAB classification, WHO classification, or revised IPSS (all P ≦ 0.001), but not in higher-risk groups. Sequential studies in 151 patients demonstrated that all IDH-mutated patients retained the same mutation during disease evolution while none of the IDH-wild patients acquired a novel mutation during follow-ups. In conclusion, IDH mutation is a useful biomarker for risk stratification of patients with lower-risk MDS. IDH mutations are stable during the clinical course. The mutation, in association with other genetic alterations, may play a role in the development, but not progression of MDS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.23596DOI Listing
February 2014

Clinical implications of U2AF1 mutation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and its stability during disease progression.

Am J Hematol 2013 Nov 3;88(11):E277-82. Epub 2013 Sep 3.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

We aimed to analyze clinical impacts of the U2AF1 mutation on patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and its stability during disease progression. We checked mutation status of the U2AF1 by direct sequencing in 478 de novo MDS patients and correlated with the clinical characteristics and outcomes. We also sequentially analyzed the U2AF1 mutation in 421 samples from 142 patients to determine its stability during the disease courses. Thirty-six patients (7.5%) were found to have U2AF1 mutations, which occurred more frequently in younger patients (P = 0.033). U2AF1 mutation was an independent poor-risk factor for overall survival (OS) in all patients (P = 0.030) and younger patients (P = 0.041). U2AF1 mutation could also predict shorter time-to-leukemia transformation (TTL) in younger patients (P = 0.020). In addition, U2AF1 mutation was associated with shorter TTL in lower-risk MDS patients. Sequential analyses showed all original U2AF1 mutations in U2AF1-mutated patients were retained during follow-ups unless complete remission was achieved, whereas none of the U2AF1-wild patients acquired a novel mutation during disease evolution. U2AF1 mutation is more prevalent in younger MDS patients and associated with inferior outcomes although it is stable during the clinical course. The mutation may be used as a biomarker for risk stratification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.23541DOI Listing
November 2013

Chromosomal abnormalities by conventional cytogenetics and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization in chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Taiwan, an area with low incidence--clinical implication and comparison between the West and the East.

Ann Hematol 2013 Jun 17;92(6):799-806. Epub 2013 Feb 17.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, 100, Taiwan.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is much less prevalent in Taiwan than in the West, but we have recently addressed the distinctly increasing incidence of CLL in Taiwan. We sought to find out whether there is any difference in cytogenetic abnormalities (CA) of CLL between the West and the East. We analyze the CA, by conventional cytogenetics (CG) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and their clinical significance in 83 Taiwanese CLL patients and compared the data to those of Western countries. Thirty-five patients (42.2 %) possessed CG-CA and 58 (69.9 %) FISH-CA. By either CG or FISH, deletion of 17p or 11q was associated with poorer overall survival (OS) (P<0.001 and P=0.008, respectively), whereas isolated 13q deletion was associated with better OS (P=0.050). Trisomy 3 by CG was found in five patients; all of them were in Binet A stage but had strikingly poor OS (P<0.001). This prognostic impact was independent from the other CA and Binet stages. We conclude that, though the disease incidence is much different, the CA of CLL in Taiwan are similar to those in the West. The combined CG and FISH analysis is able to predict the patients' prognosis. The clinical significance of trisomy 3 warrants further validation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-013-1700-xDOI Listing
June 2013

The clinical implication of SRSF2 mutation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and its stability during disease evolution.

Blood 2012 Oct 29;120(15):3106-11. Epub 2012 Aug 29.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Recurrent somatic mutation of SRSF2, one of the RNA splicing machinery genes, has been identified in a substantial proportion of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, the clinical and biologic characteristics of MDS with this mutation remain to be addressed. In this study, 34 (14.6%) of the 233 MDS patients were found to have SRSF2 mutation. SRSF2 mutation was closely associated with male sex (P = .001) and older age (P < .001). It occurred concurrently with at least 1 additional mutation in 29 patients (85.3%) and was closely associated with RUNX1, IDH2, and ASXL1 mutations (P = .004, P < .001, and P < .001, respectively). Patients with SRSF2 mutation had an inferior overall survival (P = .010), especially in the lower risk patients. Further exploration showed that the prognostic impact of SRSF2 mutation might be attributed to its close association with old age. Sequential analyses in 173 samples from 66 patients showed that all SRSF2-mutated patients retained their original mutations, whereas none of the SRSF2-wild patients acquired a novel mutation during disease evolution. In conclusion, SRSF2 mutation is associated with distinct clinical and biologic features in MDS patients. It is stable during the clinical course and may play little role in disease progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2012-02-412296DOI Listing
October 2012

DNMT3A mutations in acute myeloid leukemia: stability during disease evolution and clinical implications.

Blood 2012 Jan 10;119(2):559-68. Epub 2011 Nov 10.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

DNMT3A mutations are associated with poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but the stability of this mutation during the clinical course remains unclear. In the present study of 500 patients with de novo AML, DNMT3A mutations were identified in 14% of total patients and in 22.9% of AML patients with normal karyotype. DNMT3A mutations were positively associated with older age, higher WBC and platelet counts, intermediate-risk and normal cytogenetics, FLT3 internal tandem duplication, and NPM1, PTPN11, and IDH2 mutations, but were negatively associated with CEBPA mutations. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the DNMT3A mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival and relapse-free survival in total patients and also in normokaryotype group. A scoring system incorporating the DNMT3A mutation and 8 other prognostic factors, including age, WBC count, cytogenetics, and gene mutations, into survival analysis was very useful in stratifying AML patients into different prognostic groups (P < .001). Sequential study of 138 patients during the clinical course showed that DNMT3A mutations were stable during AML evolution. In conclusion, DNMT3A mutations are associated with distinct clinical and biologic features and poor prognosis in de novo AML patients. Furthermore, the DNMT3A mutation may be a potential biomarker for monitoring of minimal residual disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2011-07-369934DOI Listing
January 2012

TET2 mutation is an unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics.

Blood 2011 Oct 9;118(14):3803-10. Epub 2011 Aug 9.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

The studies concerning clinical implications of TET2 mutation in patients with primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are scarce. We analyzed TET2 mutation in 486 adult patients with primary AML. TET2 mutation occurred in 13.2% of our patients and was closely associated with older age, higher white blood cell and blast counts, lower platelet numbers, normal karyotype, intermediate-risk cytogenetics, isolated trisomy 8, NPM1 mutation, and ASXL1 mutation but mutually exclusive with IDH mutation. TET2 mutation is an unfavorable prognostic factor in patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics, and its negative impact was further enhanced when the mutation was combined with FLT3-ITD, NPM1-wild, or unfavorable genotypes (other than NPM1(+)/FLT3-ITD(-) or CEBPA(+)). A scoring system integrating TET2 mutation with FLT3-ITD, NPM1, and CEBPA mutations could well separate AML patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics into 4 groups with different prognoses (P < .0001). Sequential analysis revealed that TET2 mutation detected at diagnosis was frequently lost at relapse; rarely, the mutation was acquired at relapse in those without TET2 mutation at diagnosis. In conclusion, TET2 mutation is associated with poor prognosis in AML patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics, especially when it is combined with other adverse molecular markers. TET2 mutation appeared to be unstable during disease evolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2011-02-339747DOI Listing
October 2011

Distinct clinical and biological features of de novo acute myeloid leukemia with additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) mutations.

Blood 2010 Nov 6;116(20):4086-94. Epub 2010 Aug 6.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene were recently shown in various myeloid malignancies, but they have not been comprehensively investigated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we analyzed ASXL1 mutations in exon 12 in 501 adults with de novo AML. ASXL1 mutations were detected in 54 patients (10.8%), 8.9% among those with normal karyotype and 12.9% among those with abnormal cytogenetics. The mutation was closely associated with older age, male sex, isolated trisomy 8, RUNX1 mutation, and expression of human leukocyte antigen-DR and CD34, but inversely associated with t(15;17), complex cytogenetics, FLT3-internal tandem duplication, NPM1 mutations, WT1 mutations, and expression of CD33 and CD15. Patients with ASXL1 mutations had a shorter overall survival than patients without, but the mutation was not an independent adverse prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. Sequential analyses showed that the original ASXL1 mutations were lost at relapse and/or refractory status in 2 of the 6 relapsed ASXL1-mutated patients studied, whereas 2 of the 109 ASXL1-wild patients acquired a novel ASXL1 mutation at relapse. In conclusion, AML bearing ASXL1 mutations showed distinct clinical and biological features. The ASXL1 mutation status can change during disease evolution in a few patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2010-05-283291DOI Listing
November 2010

WT1 mutation in 470 adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia: stability during disease evolution and implication of its incorporation into a survival scoring system.

Blood 2010 Jun 5;115(25):5222-31. Epub 2010 Apr 5.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

The impact of WT1 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is not completely settled. We aimed to determine the clinical implication of WT1 mutation in 470 de novo non-M3 AML patients and its stability during the clinical course. WT1 mutations were identified in 6.8% of total patients and 8.3% of younger patients with normal karyotype (CN-AML). The WT1 mutation was closely associated with younger age (P < .001), French-American-British M6 subtype (P = .006), and t(7;11)(p15;p15) (P = .003). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the WT1 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival and relapse-free survival among total patients and the CN-AML group. A scoring system incorporating WT1 mutation, NPM1/FLT3-ITD, CEBPA mutations, and age into survival analysis proved to be very useful to stratify CN-AML patients into different prognostic groups (P < .001). Sequential analyses were performed on 133 patients. WT1 mutations disappeared at complete remission in all WT1-mutated patients studied. At relapse, 3 of the 16 WT1-mutated patients who had paired samples lost the mutation and 2 acquired additional mutations, whereas 3 of 110 WT1-wild patients acquired novel mutations. In conclusion, WT1 mutations are correlated with poor prognosis in AML patients. The mutation status may be changed in some patients during AML progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-12-259390DOI Listing
June 2010

Distinct clinical and biologic characteristics in adult acute myeloid leukemia bearing the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutation.

Blood 2010 Apr 22;115(14):2749-54. Epub 2010 Jan 22.

Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Mutations of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (IDH1) have been identified in patients with gliomas. Recent genome-wide screening also revealed IDH1 mutation as a recurrent event in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but its clinical implications in AML are largely unknown. We analyzed 493 adult Chinese AML patients in Taiwan and found 27 patients (5.5%) harboring this mutation. IDH1 mutation was strongly associated with normal karyotype (8.4%, P = .002), isolated monosomy 8 (P = .043), NPM1 mutation (P < .001), and French-American-British M1 subtype (P < .001), but inversely associated with French-American-British M4 subtype (P = .030) and expression of HLA-DR, CD13, and CD14 (P = .002, .003, and .038, respectively). There was no impact of this mutation on patient survival. Sequential analysis of IDH1 mutation was performed in 130 patients during follow-ups. None of the 112 patients without IDH1 mutation at diagnosis acquired this mutation at relapse. In all 18 IDH1-mutated patients studied, the mutation disappeared in complete remission; the same mutation reappeared in all 11 samples obtained at relapse. We conclude that IDH1 is associated with distinct clinical and biologic characteristics and seems to be very stable during disease evolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-11-253070DOI Listing
April 2010

AML1/RUNX1 mutations in 470 adult patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia: prognostic implication and interaction with other gene alterations.

Blood 2009 Dec 6;114(26):5352-61. Epub 2009 Oct 6.

Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Somatic mutation of the AML1/RUNX1(RUNX1) gene is seen in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M0 subtype and in AML transformed from myelodysplastic syndrome, but the impact of this gene mutation on survival in AML patients remains unclear. In this study, we sought to determine the clinical implications of RUNX1 mutations in 470 adult patients with de novo non-M3 AML. Sixty-three distinct RUNX1 mutations were identified in 62 persons (13.2%); 32 were in N-terminal and 31, C-terminal. The RUNX1 mutation was closely associated with male sex, older age, lower lactic dehydrogenase value, French-American-British M0/M1 subtypes, and expression of HLA-DR and CD34, but inversely correlated with CD33, CD15, CD19, and CD56 expression. Furthermore, the mutation was positively associated with MLL/PTD but negatively associated with CEBPA and NPM1 mutations. AML patients with RUNX1 mutations had a significantly lower complete remission rate and shorter disease-free and overall survival than those without the mutation. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that RUNX1 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival. Sequential analysis in 133 patients revealed that none acquired novel RUNX1 mutations during clinical courses. Our findings provide evidence that RUNX1 mutations are associated with distinct biologic and clinical characteristics and poor prognosis in patients with de novo AML.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2009-05-223784DOI Listing
December 2009

Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 disrupts mitotic checkpoint and causes chromosomal instability.

Carcinogenesis 2009 Feb 6;30(2):366-75. Epub 2009 Jan 6.

Graduate Institute of Microbiology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan.

The Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) plays a key role in transformation of B-lymphocytes mediated by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and can induce tumor formation in transgenic mice. However, the precise mechanism underlying EBNA2-mediated tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we report that EBNA2 can compromise mitotic spindle checkpoint (MSC) induced by the spindle inhibitor nocodazole and cause chromosomal instability (CIN) in HEp-2, U2-OS and BJAB cells. When EBNA2-expressing cells were treated with nocodazole, they exited mitosis prematurely and initiated another round of DNA synthesis. Nucleolocalization of EBNA2 was essential for EBNA2 to compromise MSC and to cause CIN. The metaphase chromosome spread data indicated that the EBNA2-expressing U2-OS cells showed a more heterogenous chromosome number distribution than the vector-transfected and parental cells. The median chromosome number for EBNA2-expressing, vector-transfected and parental U2-OS cells is 75, 65 and 64, respectively. EBNA2 was shown to be able to downregulate mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2) approximately 2- to 3-fold and upregulate polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) approximately 2-fold. The dysregulation of MAD2 and PLK1 may lead to activation of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome and premature degradation of securin. Indeed, we found that when MSC was induced by nocodazole, securin was prematurely degraded in EBNA2-expressing cells. Finally, we show that EBNA2 could induce micronuclei and multinuclei formation in HEp-2 and U2-OS cells. Together, these studies reveal a new function of EBNA2 in cell-cycle regulation and may shed light on the role of EBNA2 in EBV-mediated tumorigenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/carcin/bgn291DOI Listing
February 2009

Effect of auricular pellet acupressure on antioxidative systems in high-risk diabetes mellitus.

J Altern Complement Med 2008 Apr;14(3):303-7

National Taipei College of Nursing, Taipei, Pei Tou 112, Taiwan.

Objectives: Free radicals and lipid peroxides, both of which are easily formed in the diabetic state, play an important role in the development of diabetic complications. Antioxidative therapy may help prevent diabetic complications caused by lipoperoxidation and free-radical formation in diabetes mellitus (DM). A number of findings suggest that oxidative stress exists in persons with high-risk DM. Auricular pellet acupressure has reportedly been an effective treatment method for a variety of medical conditions, including anxiety, juvenile myopia, essential hypertension, and senile vascular dementia. However, its effects on antioxidative enzymes have not been elucidated. We therefore evaluated the impact of auricular pellet acupressure on antioxidative status in persons with high-risk DM.

Subjects: Our study involved 69 persons with high-risk DM, who were allocated either to undergo acupressure as active treatment for the experimental group or to a control group.

Interventions: The experimental group in the study received auricular pellet acupressure three times daily for 5 consecutive days. After a 2-day rest period, the procedure was performed on the contralateral ear. Acupressure was performed twice on each ear, with each application followed by its application to the contralateral ear, over a total treatment period of 20 days. The control groups did not undergo auricular pellet acupressure.

Design And Outcome Measures: At the end of the 20-day period of treatment of the experimental group, blood was collected from all of the study participants for assay of serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase concentrations, as was also done for the control group.

Results: Serum concentrations of SOD (p < 0.05) and catalase (p < 0.0001) were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that auricular pellet acupressure can increase the concentration of antioxidative enzymes in persons with high-risk DM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2006.6064DOI Listing
April 2008

Additional chromosomal abnormalities and variability of BCR breakpoints in Philadelphia chromosome/BCR-ABL-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Taiwan.

Am J Hematol 2002 Dec;71(4):291-9

Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

From 1986 to 1998, 26 (23%) of 114 adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and 11 (4%) of 328 pediatric patients were found to have Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. In the 30 patients with available data at diagnosis, 18 (60%) had extra-chromosomal abnormalities. They included 1q duplication (5/18, 28%), supernumerary Ph chromosome (4/18, 22%), 9p abnormalities (3/18, 17%), 7q deletion/monosomy 7 (3/18, 17%), trisomy 19 (1/18, 6%), and trisomy 8 (1/18, 6%). Excluding those with specific cytogenetic changes, only one patient had hyperdiploid karyotype with more than 50 chromosomes. The incidence of 1q duplication was higher and that of hyperdiploidy was lower in this study than has been previously reported. There was no prognostic implication of these additional cytogenetic abnormalities. With fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), 14 (27%) of 53 unselected adult ALL patients and 2 (5%) of 38 unselected pediatric patients were BCR-ABL-positive, including one adult and two children without Ph chromosome. The BCR-ABL fusion genes/transcripts were also present in all other 16 selected Ph-positive ALL patients. The BCR-ABL fusion subtypes were determined in all these 32 patients: 91% (11/12) childhood cases showed m-type fusion gene while 45% (9/20) adult ones did so (P = 0.0083). The clinical outcome was similar between the two groups of patients with m-type and M-type BCR-ABL. In conclusion, both cytogenetic and molecular studies are very helpful for identifying the subgroup of ALL patients with Ph/BCR-ABL. The additional cytogenetic abnormalities and subtypes of BCR-ABL fusion genes/transcripts had no significant implications in this group of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.10227DOI Listing
December 2002