Publications by authors named "Leah Aluisio"

31 Publications

Esketamine Nasal Spray Plus Oral Antidepressant in Patients With Treatment-Resistant Depression: Assessment of Long-Term Safety in a Phase 3, Open-Label Study (SUSTAIN-2).

J Clin Psychiatry 2020 04 28;81(3). Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Janssen Research & Development, San Diego, California, USA.

Objective: To evaluate long-term safety and efficacy of esketamine nasal spray plus a new oral antidepressant (OAD) in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD).

Methods: This phase 3, open-label, multicenter, long-term (up to 1 year) study was conducted between October 2015 and October 2017. Patients (≥ 18 years) with TRD (DSM-5 diagnosis of major depressive disorder and nonresponse to ≥ 2 OAD treatments) were enrolled directly or transferred from a short-term study (patients aged ≥ 65 years). Esketamine nasal spray (28-mg, 56-mg, or 84-mg) plus new OAD was administered twice a week in a 4-week induction (IND) phase and weekly or every-other-week for patients who were responders and entered a 48-week optimization/maintenance (OP/MAINT) phase.

Results: Of 802 enrolled patients, 86.2% were direct-entry and 13.8% were transferred-entry; 580 (74.5%) of 779 patients who entered the IND phase completed the phase, and 150 (24.9%) of 603 who entered the OP/MAINT phase completed the phase. Common treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were dizziness (32.9%), dissociation (27.6%), nausea (25.1%), and headache (24.9%). Seventy-six patients (9.5%) discontinued esketamine due to TEAEs. Fifty-five patients (6.9%) experienced serious TEAEs. Most TEAEs occurred on dosing days, were mild or moderate in severity, and resolved on the same day. Two deaths were reported; neither was considered related to esketamine. Cognitive performance generally either improved or remained stable postbaseline. There was no case of interstitial cystitis or respiratory depression. Treatment-emergent dissociative symptoms were transient and generally resolved within 1.5 hours postdose. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score decreased during the IND phase, and this reduction persisted during the OP/MAINT phase (mean [SD] change from baseline of respective phase to endpoint: IND, -16.4 [8.76]; OP/MAINT, 0.3 [8.12]).

Conclusions: Long-term esketamine nasal spray plus new OAD therapy had a manageable safety profile, and improvements in depression appeared to be sustained in patients with TRD.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02497287.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.19m12891DOI Listing
April 2020

Managing Esketamine Treatment Frequency Toward Successful Outcomes: Analysis of Phase 3 Data.

Int J Neuropsychopharmacol 2020 07;23(7):426-433

Janssen Research and Development, LLC, Department of Clinical Medical Affairs, Titusville, NJ.

Background: Esketamine nasal spray was recently approved for treatment-resistant depression. The current analysis evaluated the impact of symptom-based treatment frequency changes during esketamine treatment on clinical outcomes.

Methods: This is a post-hoc analysis of an open-label, long-term (up to 1 year) study of esketamine in patients with treatment-resistant depression (SUSTAIN 2). During a 4-week induction phase, 778 patients self-administered esketamine twice weekly plus a new oral antidepressant daily. In responders (≥50% reduction in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score from baseline), esketamine treatment frequency was thereafter decreased during an optimization/maintenance phase to weekly for 4 weeks and then adjusted to the lowest frequency (weekly or every other week) that maintained remission (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale ≤ 12) based on a study-defined algorithm. The relationship between treatment frequency and symptom response, based on clinically meaningful change in Clinical Global Impression-Severity score, was subsequently evaluated 4 weeks after treatment frequency adjustments in the optimization/maintenance phase.

Results: Among 580 responders treated with weekly esketamine for the first 4 weeks in the optimization/maintenance phase (per protocol), 26% continued to improve, 50% maintained clinical benefit, and 24% worsened. Thereafter, when treatment frequency could be reduced from weekly to every other week, 19% further improved, 49% maintained benefit, and 32% worsened. For patients no longer in remission after treatment frequency reduction, an increase (every other week to weekly) resulted in 47% improved, 43% remained unchanged, and 10% worsened.

Conclusions: These findings support individualization of esketamine nasal spray treatment frequency to optimize treatment response in real-world clinical practice.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02497287.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ijnp/pyaa027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7387766PMC
July 2020

Utilizing Miniature Fluorescence Microscopy to Image Hippocampal Place Cell Ensemble Function in Thy1.GCaMP6f Transgenic Mice.

Curr Protoc Pharmacol 2018 09 20;82(1):e42. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC, San Diego, California.

Imaging neuronal activity in awake behaving mice with miniature fluorescence microscopes requires the implementation of a variety of procedures. Surgeries are performed to gain access to the cell population of interest and to implant microscope components. After a recovery period, mice are trained to exhibit a desired behavior. Finally, neuronal activity is imaged and synchronized with that behavior. To take full advantage of the technology, selection of the calcium indicator and experimental design must be carefully considered. In this article, we explain the procedures and considerations that are critical for obtaining high-quality calcium imaging data. As an example, we describe how to utilize miniature fluorescence microscopy to image hippocampal place cell activity during linear track running in Thy1.GCaMP6f transgenic mice. © 2018 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cpph.42DOI Listing
September 2018

Neuropsychopharmacology of JNJ-55308942: evaluation of a clinical candidate targeting P2X7 ion channels in animal models of neuroinflammation and anhedonia.

Neuropsychopharmacology 2018 12 9;43(13):2586-2596. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC. Neuroscience Therapeutic Area, San Diego, CA, 92131, USA.

Emerging data continues to point towards a relationship between neuroinflammation and neuropsychiatric disorders. ATP-induced activation of P2X7 results in IL-1β release causing neuroinflammation and microglial activation. This study describes the in-vitro and in-vivo neuropharmacology of a novel brain-penetrant P2X7 antagonist, JNJ-55308942, currently in clinical development. JNJ-55308942 is a high-affinity, selective, brain-penetrant (brain/plasma of 1) P2X7 functional antagonist. In human blood and in mouse blood and microglia, JNJ-55308942 attenuated IL-1β release in a potent and concentration-dependent manner. After oral dosing, the compound exhibited both dose and concentration-dependent occupancy of rat brain P2X7 with an ED of 0.07 mg/kg. The P2X7 antagonist (3 mg/kg, oral) blocked Bz-ATP-induced brain IL-1β release in conscious rats, demonstrating functional effects of target engagement in the brain. JNJ-55308942 (30 mg/kg, oral) attenuated LPS-induced microglial activation in mice, assessed at day 2 after a single systemic LPS injection (0.8 mg/kg, i.p.), suggesting a role for P2X7 in microglial activation. In a model of BCG-induced depression, JNJ-55308942 dosed orally (30 mg/kg), reversed the BCG-induced deficits of sucrose preference and social interaction, indicating for the first time a role of P2X7 in the BCG model of depression, probably due to the neuroinflammatory component induced by BCG inoculation. Finally, in a rat model of chronic stress induced sucrose intake deficit, JNJ-55308942 reversed the deficit with concurrent high P2X7 brain occupancy as measured by autoradiography. This body of data demonstrates that JNJ-55308942 is a potent P2X7 antagonist, engages the target in brain, modulates IL-1β release and microglial activation leading to efficacy in two models of anhedonia in rodents.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41386-018-0141-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6224414PMC
December 2018

A Dipolar Cycloaddition Reaction To Access 6-Methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c]pyridines Enables the Discovery Synthesis and Preclinical Profiling of a P2X7 Antagonist Clinical Candidate.

J Med Chem 2018 01 20;61(1):207-223. Epub 2017 Dec 20.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC , 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121, United States.

A single pot dipolar cycloaddition reaction/Cope elimination sequence was developed to access novel 1,4,6,7-tetrahydro-5H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c]pyridine P2X7 antagonists that contain a synthetically challenging chiral center. The structure-activity relationships of the new compounds are described. Two of these compounds, (S)-(2-fluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)(1-(5-fluoropyrimidin-2-yl)-6-methyl-1,4,6,7-tetrahydro-5H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-5-yl)methanone (compound 29) and (S)-(3-fluoro-2-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-4-yl)(1-(5-fluoropyrimidin-2-yl)-6-methyl-1,4,6,7-tetrahydro-5H-[1,2,3]triazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-5-yl)methanone (compound 35), were found to have robust P2X7 receptor occupancy at low doses in rat with ED values of 0.06 and 0.07 mg/kg, respectively. Compound 35 had notable solubility compared to 29 and showed good tolerability in preclinical species. Compound 35 was chosen as a clinical candidate for advancement into phase I clinical trials to assess safety and tolerability in healthy human subjects prior to the initiation of proof of concept studies for the treatment of mood disorders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b01279DOI Listing
January 2018

4-Methyl-6,7-dihydro-4H-triazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-Based P2X7 Receptor Antagonists: Optimization of Pharmacokinetic Properties Leading to the Identification of a Clinical Candidate.

J Med Chem 2017 06 25;60(11):4559-4572. Epub 2017 May 25.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC , 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121, United States.

The synthesis and preclinical characterization of novel 4-(R)-methyl-6,7-dihydro-4H-triazolo[4,5-c]pyridines that are potent and selective brain penetrant P2X7 antagonists are described. Optimization efforts based on previously disclosed unsubstituted 6,7-dihydro-4H-triazolo[4,5-c]pyridines, methyl substituted 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrazines, and several other series lead to the identification of a series of 4-(R)-methyl-6,7-dihydro-4H-triazolo[4,5-c]pyridines that are selective P2X7 antagonists with potency at the rodent and human P2X7 ion channels. These novel P2X7 antagonists have suitable physicochemical properties, and several analogs have an excellent pharmacokinetic profile, good partitioning into the CNS and show robust in vivo target engagement after oral dosing. Improvements in metabolic stability led to the identification of JNJ-54175446 (14) as a candidate for clinical development. The drug discovery efforts and strategies that resulted in the identification of the clinical candidate are described herein.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.7b00408DOI Listing
June 2017

Direct Imaging of Hippocampal Epileptiform Calcium Motifs Following Kainic Acid Administration in Freely Behaving Mice.

Front Neurosci 2016 29;10:53. Epub 2016 Feb 29.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC San Diego, CA, USA.

Prolonged exposure to abnormally high calcium concentrations is thought to be a core mechanism underlying hippocampal damage in epileptic patients; however, no prior study has characterized calcium activity during seizures in the live, intact hippocampus. We have directly investigated this possibility by combining whole-brain electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements with microendoscopic calcium imaging of pyramidal cells in the CA1 hippocampal region of freely behaving mice treated with the pro-convulsant kainic acid (KA). We observed that KA administration led to systematic patterns of epileptiform calcium activity: a series of large-scale, intensifying flashes of increased calcium fluorescence concurrent with a cluster of low-amplitude EEG waveforms. This was accompanied by a steady increase in cellular calcium levels (>5 fold increase relative to the baseline), followed by an intense spreading calcium wave characterized by a 218% increase in global mean intensity of calcium fluorescence (n = 8, range [114-349%], p < 10(-4); t-test). The wave had no consistent EEG phenotype and occurred before the onset of motor convulsions. Similar changes in calcium activity were also observed in animals treated with 2 different proconvulsant agents, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), suggesting the measured changes in calcium dynamics are a signature of seizure activity rather than a KA-specific pathology. Additionally, despite reducing the behavioral severity of KA-induced seizures, the anticonvulsant drug valproate (VA, 300 mg/kg) did not modify the observed abnormalities in calcium dynamics. These results confirm the presence of pathological calcium activity preceding convulsive motor seizures and support calcium as a candidate signaling molecule in a pathway connecting seizures to subsequent cellular damage. Integrating in vivo calcium imaging with traditional assessment of seizures could potentially increase translatability of pharmacological intervention, leading to novel drug screening paradigms and therapeutics designed to target and abolish abnormal patterns of both electrical and calcium excitation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2016.00053DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4770289PMC
March 2016

Characterization of JNJ-42847922, a Selective Orexin-2 Receptor Antagonist, as a Clinical Candidate for the Treatment of Insomnia.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2015 Sep 15;354(3):471-82. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC, San Diego, California

Dual orexin receptor antagonists have been shown to promote sleep in various species, including humans. Emerging research indicates that selective orexin-2 receptor (OX2R) antagonists may offer specificity and a more adequate sleep profile by preserving normal sleep architecture. Here, we characterized JNJ-42847922 ([5-(4,6-dimethyl-pyrimidin-2-yl)-hexahydro-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrol-2-yl]-(2-fluoro-6-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-phenyl)-methanone), a high-affinity/potent OX2R antagonist. JNJ-42847922 had an approximate 2-log selectivity ratio versus the human orexin-1 receptor. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that JNJ-42847922 quickly occupied OX2R binding sites in the rat brain after oral administration and rapidly cleared from the brain. In rats, single oral administration of JNJ-42847922 (3-30 mg/kg) during the light phase dose dependently reduced the latency to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and prolonged NREM sleep time in the first 2 hours, whereas REM sleep was minimally affected. The reduced sleep onset and increased sleep duration were maintained upon 7-day repeated dosing (30 mg/kg) with JNJ-42847922, then all sleep parameters returned to baseline levels following discontinuation. Although the compound promoted sleep in wild-type mice, it had no effect in OX2R knockout mice, consistent with a specific OX2R-mediated sleep response. JNJ-42847922 did not increase dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens or produce place preference in mice after subchronic conditioning, indicating that the compound lacks intrinsic motivational properties in contrast to zolpidem. In a single ascending dose study conducted in healthy subjects, JNJ-42847922 increased somnolence and displayed a favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile for a sedative/hypnotic, thus emerging as a promising candidate for further clinical development for the treatment of insomnia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.115.225466DOI Listing
September 2015

Novel benzamide-based histamine h3 receptor antagonists: the identification of two candidates for clinical development.

ACS Med Chem Lett 2015 Apr 13;6(4):450-4. Epub 2015 Mar 13.

Janssen Pharmaceutical Company, a division of Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C. , 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, California 92121, United States.

The preclinical characterization of novel phenyl(piperazin-1-yl)methanones that are histamine H3 receptor antagonists is described. The compounds described are high affinity histamine H3 antagonists. Optimization of the physical properties of these histamine H3 antagonists led to the discovery of several promising lead compounds, and extensive preclinical profiling aided in the identification of compounds with optimal duration of action for wake promoting activity. This led to the discovery of two development candidates for Phase I and Phase II clinical trials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ml5005156DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4394347PMC
April 2015

Zolpidem reduces hippocampal neuronal activity in freely behaving mice: a large scale calcium imaging study with miniaturized fluorescence microscope.

PLoS One 2014 5;9(11):e112068. Epub 2014 Nov 5.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC, San Diego, California, United States of America.

Therapeutic drugs for cognitive and psychiatric disorders are often characterized by their molecular mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate a new approach to elucidate drug action on large-scale neuronal activity by tracking somatic calcium dynamics in hundreds of CA1 hippocampal neurons of pharmacologically manipulated behaving mice. We used an adeno-associated viral vector to express the calcium sensor GCaMP3 in CA1 pyramidal cells under control of the CaMKII promoter and a miniaturized microscope to observe cellular dynamics. We visualized these dynamics with and without a systemic administration of Zolpidem, a GABAA agonist that is the most commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of insomnia in the United States. Despite growing concerns about the potential adverse effects of Zolpidem on memory and cognition, it remained unclear whether Zolpidem alters neuronal activity in the hippocampus, a brain area critical for cognition and memory. Zolpidem, when delivered at a dose known to induce and prolong sleep, strongly suppressed CA1 calcium signaling. The rate of calcium transients after Zolpidem administration was significantly lower compared to vehicle treatment. To factor out the contribution of changes in locomotor or physiological conditions following Zolpidem treatment, we compared the cellular activity across comparable epochs matched by locomotor and physiological assessments. This analysis revealed significantly depressive effects of Zolpidem regardless of the animal's state. Individual hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differed in their responses to Zolpidem with the majority (∼ 65%) significantly decreasing the rate of calcium transients, and a small subset (3%) showing an unexpected and significant increase. By linking molecular mechanisms with the dynamics of neural circuitry and behavioral states, this approach has the potential to contribute substantially to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0112068PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4221229PMC
November 2015

Pharmacology of a novel central nervous system-penetrant P2X7 antagonist JNJ-42253432.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2014 Dec 30;351(3):628-41. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Neuroscience Therapeutic Area, Janssen Research & Development, LLC, San Diego, California (B.L., L.A., J.R.S., R.A.N., T.W.L., N.C., P.B., M.A.L., A.B.); Neuroscience Therapeutic Area, Janssen Research & Development, Division of Janssen Pharmaceutica NV, Beerse, Belgium (M.C., W.D.); and Behavioral Neuroscience Program, Department of Psychology, Binghamton University-State University of New York, Binghamton, New York (E.I.V., T.D.)

In the central nervous system, the ATP-gated Purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 7 (P2X7) is expressed in glial cells and modulates neurophysiology via release of gliotransmitters, including the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. In this study, we characterized JNJ-42253432 [2-methyl-N-([1-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)cyclohexyl]methyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-5-carboxamide] as a centrally permeable (brain-to-plasma ratio of 1), high-affinity P2X7 antagonist with desirable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties for in vivo testing in rodents. JNJ-42253432 is a high-affinity antagonist for the rat (pKi 9.1 ± 0.07) and human (pKi 7.9 ± 0.08) P2X7 channel. The compound blocked the ATP-induced current and Bz-ATP [2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine-5'-triphosphate tri(triethylammonium)]-induced release of IL-1β in a concentration-dependent manner. When dosed in rats, JNJ-42253432 occupied the brain P2X7 channel with an ED50 of 0.3 mg/kg, corresponding to a mean plasma concentration of 42 ng/ml. The compound blocked the release of IL-1β induced by Bz-ATP in freely moving rat brain. At higher doses/exposure, JNJ-42253432 also increased serotonin levels in the rat brain, which is due to antagonism of the serotonin transporter (SERT) resulting in an ED50 of 10 mg/kg for SERT occupancy. JNJ-42253432 reduced electroencephalography spectral power in the α-1 band in a dose-dependent manner; the compound also attenuated amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. JNJ-42253432 significantly increased both overall social interaction and social preference, an effect that was independent of stress induced by foot-shock. Surprisingly, there was no effect of the compound on either neuropathic pain or inflammatory pain behaviors. In summary, in this study, we characterize JNJ-42253432 as a novel brain-penetrant P2X7 antagonist with high affinity and selectivity for the P2X7 channel.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.114.218487DOI Listing
December 2014

Pharmacological or genetic orexin1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex.

Front Neurosci 2014 20;8:107. Epub 2014 May 20.

Janssen Pharmaceutical Research and Development, LLC San Diego, USA.

The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors). The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward, and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg) to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C.) which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient) or genetic (permanent) inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2014.00107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4033200PMC
June 2014

Pharmacological characterization of a novel centrally permeable P2X7 receptor antagonist: JNJ-47965567.

Br J Pharmacol 2013 Oct;170(3):624-40

Neuroscience Therapeutic Area, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, San Diego, CA, USA.

Background And Purpose: An increasing body of evidence suggests that the purinergic receptor P2X, ligand-gated ion channel, 7 (P2X7) in the CNS may play a key role in neuropsychiatry, neurodegeneration and chronic pain. In this study, we characterized JNJ-47965567, a centrally permeable, high-affinity, selective P2X7 antagonist.

Experimental Approach: We have used a combination of in vitro assays (calcium flux, radioligand binding, electrophysiology, IL-1β release) in both recombinant and native systems. Target engagement of JNJ-47965567 was demonstrated by ex vivo receptor binding autoradiography and in vivo blockade of Bz-ATP induced IL-1β release in the rat brain. Finally, the efficacy of JNJ-47965567 was tested in standard models of depression, mania and neuropathic pain.

Key Results: JNJ-47965567 is potent high affinity (pKi 7.9 ± 0.07), selective human P2X7 antagonist, with no significant observed speciation. In native systems, the potency of the compound to attenuate IL-1β release was 6.7 ± 0.07 (human blood), 7.5 ± 0.07 (human monocytes) and 7.1 ± 0.1 (rat microglia). JNJ-47965567 exhibited target engagement in rat brain, with a brain EC50 of 78 ± 19 ng·mL(-1) (P2X7 receptor autoradiography) and functional block of Bz-ATP induced IL-1β release. JNJ-47965567 (30 mg·kg(-1) ) attenuated amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and exhibited modest, yet significant efficacy in the rat model of neuropathic pain. No efficacy was observed in forced swim test.

Conclusion And Implications: JNJ-47965567 is centrally permeable, high affinity P2X7 antagonist that can be used to probe the role of central P2X7 in rodent models of CNS pathophysiology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12314DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3792000PMC
October 2013

Translational evaluation of JNJ-18038683, a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor antagonist, on rapid eye movement sleep and in major depressive disorder.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2012 Aug 8;342(2):429-40. Epub 2012 May 8.

Janssen Research & Development, LLC, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92109, USA.

In rodents 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT(7)) receptor blockade has been shown to be effective in models of depression and to increase the latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and decrease REM duration. In the clinic, the REM sleep reduction observed with many antidepressants may serve as a biomarker. We report here the preclinical and clinical evaluation of a 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1-(phenylmethyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]azepine 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylate) (JNJ-18038683). In rodents, JNJ-18038683 increased the latency to REM sleep and decreased REM duration, and this effect was maintained after repeated administration for 7 days. The compound was effective in the mouse tail suspension test. JNJ-18038683 enhanced serotonin transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents. In healthy human volunteers JNJ-18038683 prolonged REM latency and reduced REM sleep duration, demonstrating that the effect of 5-HT(7) blockade on REM sleep translated from rodents to humans. Like in rats, JNJ-18038683 enhanced REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in humans, although a drug-drug interaction could not be ruled out. In a double-blind, active, and placebo-controlled clinical trial in 225 patients suffering from major depressive disorder, neither treatment with pharmacologically active doses of JNJ-18038683 or escitalopram separated from placebo, indicating a failed study lacking assay sensitivity. Post hoc analyses using an enrichment window strategy, where all the efficacy data from sites with an implausible high placebo response [placebo group Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) < = 12] and from sites with no placebo response (MADRS > = 28) are removed, there was a clinically meaningful difference between JNJ-18038683 and placebo. Further clinical studies are required to characterize the potential antidepressant efficacy of JNJ-18038683.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.112.193995DOI Listing
August 2012

Pharmacological blockade of serotonin 5-HT₇ receptor reverses working memory deficits in rats by normalizing cortical glutamate neurotransmission.

PLoS One 2011 20;6(6):e20210. Epub 2011 Jun 20.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C., San Diego, California, United States of America.

The role of 5-HT₇ receptor has been demonstrated in various animal models of mood disorders; however its function in cognition remains largely speculative. This study evaluates the effects of SB-269970, a selective 5-HT₇ antagonist, in a translational model of working memory deficit and investigates whether it modulates cortical glutamate and/or dopamine neurotransmission in rats. The effect of SB-269970 was evaluated in the delayed non-matching to position task alone or in combination with MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, and, in separate experiments, with scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist. SB-269970 (10 mg/kg) significantly reversed the deficits induced by MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) but augmented the deficit induced by scopolamine (0.06 mg/kg). The ability of SB-269970 to modulate MK-801-induced glutamate and dopamine extracellular levels was separately evaluated using biosensor technology and microdialysis in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. SB-269970 normalized MK-801 -induced glutamate but not dopamine extracellular levels in the prefrontal cortex. Rat plasma and brain concentrations of MK-801 were not affected by co-administration of SB-269970, arguing for a pharmacodynamic rather than a pharmacokinetic mechanism. These results indicate that 5-HT₇ receptor antagonists might reverse cognitive deficits associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by selectively normalizing glutamatergic neurotransmission.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0020210PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3119073PMC
October 2011

Selective blockade of the orexin-2 receptor attenuates ethanol self-administration, place preference, and reinstatement.

Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2011 May 22;215(1):191-203. Epub 2010 Dec 22.

Neuroscience, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, LLC, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Rationale: Orexin-1 receptor antagonists have been shown to block the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse and food. However, whether blockade of orexin-2 receptor has similar effects has not been determined. We have recently described the in vitro and in vivo effects of JNJ-10397049, a selective and brain penetrant orexin-2 receptor antagonist.

Objective: The goal of these studies was to evaluate whether systemic administration of JNJ-10397049 blocks the rewarding effects of ethanol and reverses ethanol withdrawal in rodents. As a comparison, SB-408124, a selective orexin-1 receptor antagonist, was also evaluated.

Methods: Rats were trained to orally self-administer ethanol (8% v/v) or saccharin (0.1% v/v) under a fixed-ratio 3 schedule of reinforcement. A separate group of rats received a liquid diet of ethanol (8% v/v) and withdrawal signs were evaluated 4 h after ethanol discontinuation. In addition, ethanol-induced increases in extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens were tested. In separate experiments, the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) were evaluated in mice.

Results: Our results indicate that JNJ-10397049 (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg, sc) dose-dependently reduced ethanol self-administration without changing saccharin self-administration, dopamine levels, or withdrawal signs in rats. Treatment with JNJ-10397049 (10 mg/kg, sc) attenuated the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of ethanol CPP and ethanol-induced hyperactivity in mice. Surprisingly, SB-408124 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, sc) did not have any effect in these procedures.

Conclusions: Collectively, these results indicate, for the first time, that blockade of orexin-2 receptors is effective in reducing the reinforcing effects of ethanol.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-010-2127-xDOI Listing
May 2011

JNJ-39220675, a novel selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, reduces the abuse-related effects of alcohol in rats.

Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2011 Apr 18;214(4):829-41. Epub 2010 Nov 18.

Bristol Myers-Squibb, 5 Research Parkway, Wallingford, CT 06492, USA.

Rationale: A few recent studies suggest that brain histamine levels and signaling via H(3) receptors play an important role in modulation of alcohol stimulation and reward in rodents.

Objective: The present study characterized the effects of a novel, selective, and brain penetrant H(3) receptor antagonist (JNJ-39220675) on the reinforcing effects of alcohol in rats.

Methods: The effect of JNJ-39220675 on alcohol intake and alcohol relapse-like behavior was evaluated in selectively bred alcohol-preferring (P) rats using the standard two-bottle choice method. The compound was also tested on operant alcohol self administration in non-dependent rats and on alcohol-induced ataxia using the rotarod apparatus. In addition, alcohol-induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens was tested in freely moving rats.

Results: Subcutaneous administration of the selective H(3) receptor antagonist dose-dependently reduced both alcohol intake and preference in alcohol-preferring rats. JNJ-39220675 also reduced alcohol preference in the same strain of rats following a 3-day alcohol deprivation. The compound significantly and dose-dependently reduced alcohol self-administration without changing saccharin self-administration in alcohol non-dependent rats. Furthermore, the compound did not change the ataxic effects of alcohol, alcohol elimination rate, nor alcohol-induced dopamine release in nucleus accumbens.

Conclusions: These results indicate that blockade of H(3) receptor should be considered as a new attractive mechanism for the treatment of alcoholism.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-010-2092-4DOI Listing
April 2011

Neuropeptide S stimulates dopaminergic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex.

J Neurochem 2010 Oct 30;115(2):475-82. Epub 2010 Aug 30.

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697, USA.

Neuropeptide S (NPS) is known to produce anxiolytic-like effects and facilitate extinction of conditioned fear. Catecholaminergic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been suggested to be crucially involved in these brain functions. In the current study, we investigated the effect of NPS on the release of dopamine and serotonin in the mPFC by in vivo microdialysis in rats. Central administration of NPS dose-dependently enhanced extracellular levels of dopamine and its major metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, with maximal effects lasting up to 120 min. In contrast, no effect on serotonergic neurotransmission was detected. Dopamine release in the mPFC has been previously linked to modulation of anxiety states and fear extinction. The present results may thus provide a physiological and anatomical basis for the reported effects of NPS on these behaviors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-4159.2010.06947.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2970681PMC
October 2010

Pre-clinical characterization of aryloxypyridine amides as histamine H3 receptor antagonists: identification of candidates for clinical development.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2010 Jul 16;20(14):4210-4. Epub 2010 May 16.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

The pre-clinical characterization of novel aryloxypyridine amides that are histamine H(3) receptor antagonists is described. These compounds are high affinity histamine H(3) ligands that penetrate the CNS and occupy the histamine H(3) receptor in rat brain. Several compounds were extensively profiled pre-clinically leading to the identification of two compounds suitable for nomination as development candidates.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.05.041DOI Listing
July 2010

Novel substituted pyrrolidines are high affinity histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2010 May 20;20(9):2755-60. Epub 2010 Mar 20.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, United States.

Pre-clinical characterization of novel substituted pyrrolidines that are high affinity histamine H(3) receptor antagonists is described. These compounds efficiently penetrate the CNS and occupy the histamine H(3) receptor in rat brain following oral administration. One compound, (2S,4R)-1-[2-(4-cyclobutyl-[1,4]diazepane-1-carbonyl)-4-(3-fluoro-phenoxy)-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-ethanone, was extensively profiled and shows promise as a potential clinical candidate.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2010.03.071DOI Listing
May 2010

In vitro and in vivo characterization of JNJ-31020028 (N-(4-{4-[2-(diethylamino)-2-oxo-1-phenylethyl]piperazin-1-yl}-3-fluorophenyl)-2-pyridin-3-ylbenzamide), a selective brain penetrant small molecule antagonist of the neuropeptide Y Y(2) receptor.

Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2010 Feb 2;208(2):265-77. Epub 2009 Dec 2.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Rationale: The lack of potent, selective, brain penetrant Y(2) receptor antagonists has hampered in vivo functional studies of this receptor.

Objective: Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo characterization of JNJ-31020028 (N-(4-{4-[2-(diethylamino)-2-oxo-1-phenylethyl]piperazin-1-yl}-3-fluorophenyl)-2-pyridin-3-ylbenzamide), a novel Y(2) receptor antagonist.

Methods: The affinity of JNJ-31020028 was determined by inhibition of the PYY binding to human Y(2) receptors in KAN-Ts cells and rat Y(2) receptors in rat hippocampus. The functional activity was determined by inhibition of PYY-stimulated calcium responses in KAN-Ts cells expressing a chimeric G protein Gqi5 and in the rat vas deferens (a prototypical Y(2) bioassay). Ex vivo receptor occupancy was revealed by receptor autoradiography. JNJ-31020028 was tested in vivo with microdialysis, in anxiety models, and on corticosterone release.

Results: JNJ-31020028 bound with high affinity (pIC(50) = 8.07 +/- 0.05, human, and pIC(50) = 8.22 +/- 0.06, rat) and was >100-fold selective versus human Y(1), Y(4), and Y(5) receptors. JNJ-31020028 was demonstrated to be an antagonist (pK(B) = 8.04 +/- 0.13) in functional assays. JNJ-31020028 occupied Y(2) receptor binding sites (approximately 90% at 10 mg/kg) after subcutaneous administration in rats. JNJ-31020028 increased norepinephrine release in the hypothalamus, consistent with the colocalization of norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y. In a variety of anxiety models, JNJ-31020028 was found to be ineffective, although it did block stress-induced elevations in plasma corticosterone, without altering basal levels, and normalized food intake in stressed animals without affecting basal food intake.

Conclusion: These results suggest that Y(2) receptors may not be critical for acute behaviors in rodents but may serve modulatory roles that can only be elucidated under specific situational conditions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-009-1726-xDOI Listing
February 2010

Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of norfluoxetine in rats: Increasing extracellular serotonin level in the frontal cortex.

Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2009 May 5;92(3):469-73. Epub 2009 Feb 5.

Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L. L. C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Norfluoxetine is the most important active metabolite of the widely used antidepressant fluoxetine. Although the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) relationship and neurochemical profile of fluoxetine is well characterized in human and in animals, little is known about the effect of its metabolite. The aim of this study was to characterize extracellular level of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)-time profile of norfluoxetine after acute administration over 18 h post dose and to establish the relationship between this pharmacodynamic (PD) profile and its pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Following subcutaneous administration of fluoxetine in rats, plasma and brain PK of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine were monitored respectively by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The extracellular level of 5-HT in the frontal cortex was measured by microdialysis as a PD endpoint. Norfluoxetine when directly administrated to rats caused a significant increase in extracellular level of 5-HT in the frontal cortex and maintained for 18 h. This result is correlated well with higher plasma and brain concentration and longer plasma and brain retention time of norfluoxetine. Our results showed that norfluoxetine contributes to 5-HT transporter inhibition and extends fluoxetine efficacy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2009.01.023DOI Listing
May 2009

Blockade of orexin-1 receptors attenuates orexin-2 receptor antagonism-induced sleep promotion in the rat.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2009 Jul 10;330(1):142-51. Epub 2009 Apr 10.

Neuroscience, Johnson & Johnson PRD, 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Orexins are peptides produced by lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in the maintenance of wakefulness by activating orexin-1 (OX1R) and orexin-2 (OX2R) receptor located in wake-active structures. Pharmacological blockade of both receptors by the dual OX1/2R antagonist (2R)-2-[(1S)-6,7-dimethoxy-1-{2-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]ethyl}-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl]-N-methyl-2-phenylethanamide (almorexant) has been shown to promote sleep in animals and humans during their active period. However, the selective distribution of OX1R and OX2R in distinct neuronal circuits may result in a differential impact of these receptors in sleep-wake modulation. The respective role of OX1R and OX2R on sleep in correlation with monoamine release was evaluated in rats treated with selective antagonists alone or in combination. When administered in either phase of the light/dark cycle, the OX2R antagonist 1-(2,4-dibromophenyl)-3-[(4S,5S)-2,2-dimethyl-4-phenyl-1,3-dioxan-5-yl]urea (JNJ-10397049) decreased the latency for persistent sleep and increased nonrapid eye movement and rapid eye movement sleep time. Almorexant produced less hypnotic activity, whereas the OX1R antagonist 1-(6,8-difluoro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]urea (SB-408124) had no effect. Microdialysis studies showed that either OX2R or OX1/2R antagonism decreased extracellular histamine concentration in the lateral hypothalamus, whereas both OX1R and OX1/2R antagonists increased dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex. Finally, coadministration of the OX1R with the OX2R antagonist greatly attenuated the sleep-promoting effects of the OX2R antagonist. These results indicate that blockade of OX2R is sufficient to initiate and prolong sleep, consistent with the hypothesis of a deactivation of the histaminergic system. In addition, it is suggested that simultaneous inhibition of OX1R attenuates the sleep-promoting effects mediated by selective OX2R blockade, possibly correlated with dopaminergic neurotransmission.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.109.152009DOI Listing
July 2009

JNJ-10181457, a selective non-imidazole histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, normalizes acetylcholine neurotransmission and has efficacy in translational rat models of cognition.

Neuropharmacology 2009 Jun 2;56(8):1131-7. Epub 2009 Apr 2.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C., San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Histamine 3 (H(3)) receptors are distributed throughout the brain and regulate histamine as well as the activity of other neurotransmitters including acetylcholine (ACh). Impaired ACh neurotransmission is associated with deficits of cognitive-related functioning in many species including humans. The goal of these studies was to evaluate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of JNJ-10181457, a selective non-imidazole histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, in rats. The pharmacokinetic profile and receptor occupancy of JNJ-10181457 were tested. The efficacy of JNJ-10181457 was evaluated, acutely, in the imetit-induced water licking model, delayed non-matching to position (DNMTP) task and microdialysis studies. In addition, the effects of repeated administration of JNJ-10181457 were evaluated in the reversal learning task. A single administration of JNJ-10181457 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in significant plasma and brain exposure and maximal H(3) receptor occupancy. In addition, JNJ-10181457 reversed imetit-induced water licking, similarly to thioperamide (10 mg/kg, i.p.). In the DNMTP task, scopolamine (0.06 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased percentage correct responding. These effects were significantly reversed by JNJ-10181457 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and also by donepezil (1 mg/kg, i.p.), an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, and were associated with normalization of ACh neurotransmission in the cortex. Repeated administration of JNJ-10181457 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased percentage correct responding in the reversal learning task. Treatment discontinuation was not associated with rebound effects on cognition. These results indicate that selective blockade of histamine H(3) receptors might have therapeutic utility for the treatment of working memory deficits and learning disorders, especially those in which ACh neurotransmission is compromised.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2009.03.011DOI Listing
June 2009

In-vitro and in-vivo characterization of JNJ-7925476, a novel triple monoamine uptake inhibitor.

Eur J Pharmacol 2008 Jun 10;587(1-3):141-6. Epub 2008 Apr 10.

Department of Neuroscience, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Triple reuptake inhibitors, which block the serotonin transporter (SERT), norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in the central nervous system have been described as therapeutic alternatives for classical selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, with advantages due to their multiple mechanisms of action. JNJ-7925476 (trans-6-(4-ethynylphenyl)-1,2,3,5,6,10b-hexahydropyrrolo[2,1-a]isoquinoline) is a selective and potent inhibitor of the SERT, NET, and DAT (K(i)=0.9, 17 and 5.2 nM, respectively). Following subcutaneous dosing in rat, JNJ-7925476 was rapidly absorbed into the plasma, and drug concentrations in the brain tracked with those in the plasma but were 7-fold higher. The ED(50) values for JNJ-7925476 occupancy of the SERT, NET, and DAT in rat brain were 0.18, 0.09 and 2.4 mg/kg, respectively. JNJ-7925476 (0.1-10 mg/kg, s.c.) rapidly induced a robust, dose-dependent increase in extracellular serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine levels in rat cerebral cortex. The compound also showed potent antidepressant-like activity in the mouse tail suspension test (ED(50)=0.3 mg/kg, i.p.). These results demonstrate that JNJ-7925476 is a triple reuptake inhibitor with in-vivo efficacy in biochemical and behavioral models of depression.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2008.04.008DOI Listing
June 2008

Lead identification of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors-histamine H3 receptor antagonists from molecular modeling.

Bioorg Med Chem 2008 Mar 25;16(6):2968-73. Epub 2007 Dec 25.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, L.L.C. 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Currently, the only clinically effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the use of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors. These inhibitors have limited efficacy in that they only treat the symptoms and not the disease itself. Additionally, they often have unpleasant side effects. Here we consider the viability of a single molecule having the actions of both an AChE inhibitor and histamine H(3) receptor antagonist. Both histamine H(3) receptor antagonists and AChE inhibitors improve and augment cholinergic neurotransmission in the cortex. However, whereas an AChE inhibitor will impart its effect everywhere, a histamine H(3) antagonist will raise acetylcholine levels mostly in the brain as its mode of action will primarily be on the central nervous system. Therefore, the combination of both activities in a single molecule could be advantageous. Indeed, studies suggest an appropriate dual-acting compound may offer the desired therapeutic effect with fewer unpleasant side effects [CNS Drugs2004, 18, 827]. Further, recent studies(2) indicate the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE interacts with the beta-amyloid (betaA) peptide. Consequently, a molecule capable of disrupting this interaction may have a significant impact on the production of or the aggregation of betaA. This may result in slowing down the progression of the disease rather than only treating the symptoms as current therapies do. Here, we detail how the use of the available crystal structure information, pharmacophore modeling and docking (automated, manual, classical, and QM/MM) lead to the identification of an AChE inhibitor-histamine H(3) receptor antagonist. Further, based on our models we speculate that this dual-acting compound may interact with the PAS. Such a dual-acting compound may be able to affect the pathology of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmc.2007.12.048DOI Listing
March 2008

Pharmacological characterization of JNJ-28583867, a histamine H(3) receptor antagonist and serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

Eur J Pharmacol 2007 Dec 14;576(1-3):43-54. Epub 2007 Aug 14.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Wake-promoting agents such as modafinil are used in the clinic as adjuncts to antidepressant therapy in order to alleviate lethargy. The wake-promoting action of histamine H(3) receptor antagonists has been evidenced in numerous animal studies. They may therefore be a viable strategy for use as an antidepressant therapy in conjunction with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. JNJ-28583867 (2-Methyl-4-(4-methylsulfanyl-phenyl)-7-(3-morpholin-4-yl-propoxy)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinoline) is a selective and potent histamine H(3) receptor antagonist (K(i)=10.6 nM) and inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SERT) (K(i)=3.7 nM), with 30-fold selectivity for SERT over the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters. After subcutaneous administration, JNJ-28583867 occupied both the histamine H(3) receptor and the SERT in rat brain at low doses (<1 mg/kg). JNJ-28583867 blocked imetit-induced drinking (3-10 mg/kg i.p.), confirming in vivo functional activity at the histamine H(3) receptor and also significantly increased cortical extracellular levels of serotonin at doses of 0.3 mg/kg (s.c.) and higher. Smaller increases in cortical extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine were also observed. JNJ-28583867 (3-30 mg/kg p.o.) showed antidepressant-like activity in the mouse tail suspension test. JNJ-28583867 (1-3 mg/kg s.c.) caused a dose-dependent increase in the time spent awake mirrored by a decrease in NREM. Concomitantly, JNJ-28583867 produced a potent suppression of REM sleep from the dose of 1 mg/kg onwards. JNJ-28583867 has good oral bioavailability in the rat (32%), a half-life of 6.9 h and a C(max) of 260 ng/ml after 10 mg/kg p.o. In summary, JNJ-28583867 is a combined histamine H(3) receptor antagonist-SERT inhibitor with in vivo efficacy in biochemical and behavioral models of depression and wakefulness.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2007.08.009DOI Listing
December 2007

Pyrrolidino-tetrahydroisoquinolines bearing pendant heterocycles as potent dual H3 antagonist and serotonin transporter inhibitors.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2007 Aug 16;17(15):4374-7. Epub 2007 Mar 16.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, La Jolla, CA 92121, USA.

A series of novel and potent 6-heteroaryl-pyrrolidino-tetrahydroisoquinolines with dual histamine H(3) antagonist/serotonin transporter inhibitor activity is described. In vitro and in vivo data are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2007.03.043DOI Listing
August 2007

Pyrrolidino-tetrahydroisoquinolines as potent dual H3 antagonist and serotonin transporter inhibitors.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2007 May 4;17(9):2603-7. Epub 2007 Feb 4.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, La Jolla, CA 92121, USA.

A series of novel and potent pyrrolidino-tetrahydroisoquinolines with dual histamine H(3) antagonist/serotonin transporter inhibitor activity is described. A highly regio- and diastereoselective synthesis of the pyrrolidino-tetrahydroisoquinoline core involving acid mediated ring-closure of an acetophenone intermediate followed by reduction with NaCNBH(3) was developed. In vitro and in vivo data are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2007.01.106DOI Listing
May 2007

Selective blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptors enhances 5-HT transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and rapid eye movement sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther 2007 May 21;321(2):690-8. Epub 2007 Feb 21.

Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research & Development, L.L.C., 3210 Merryfield Row, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Evidence has accumulated supporting a role for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptors in circadian rhythms, sleep, and mood disorders, presumably as a consequence of the modulation of 5-HT-mediated neuronal activity. We hypothesized that a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]-pyrrolidine (SB-269970), should increase activity of 5-HT neurons and potentiate the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram). In rats, administration of 3 mg/kg s.c. citalopram alone increased the extracellular concentration of 5-HT. This effect of citalopram on extracellular 5-HT concentration was significantly enhanced by an ineffective dose of SB-269970. Combining this dose of SB-269970 with a low dose of citalopram also resulted in a significant increase in extracellular concentration of 5-HT, suggesting a potentiation of neurochemical effects. In mice, citalopram and SB-269970 dose-dependently decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test. The dose-effect curve of citalopram was shifted leftward by coadministration of an effective dose of SB-269970. Furthermore, combining ineffective doses of citalopram and SB-269970 also resulted in a significant decrease of immobility time in the tail suspension test, suggesting potentiation of antidepressant-like effects. In rats, SB-269970 potentiated the increase of rapid eye movement (REM) latency and the REM sleep decrease induced by citalopram. SB-269970 also reversed the increase in sleep fragmentation induced by citalopram. Rat plasma and brain concentrations of citalopram were not affected by coadministration of SB-269970, arguing for a pharmacodynamic rather than a pharmacokinetic mechanism. Overall, these results indicate that selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors may enhance the antidepressant efficacy of citalopram and may provide a novel therapy to alleviate sleep disturbances associated with depression.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/jpet.107.119404DOI Listing
May 2007