Publications by authors named "Lawrence S Meyers"

9 Publications

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Feeling Good About Your Partners' Relationships: Compersion in Consensually Non-Monogamous Relationships.

Arch Sex Behav 2021 May 1;50(4):1569-1585. Epub 2021 Jun 1.

Department of Psychology, California State University, Amador Hall 353B, MS 6007 6000 J Street, Sacramento, CA, 95819, USA.

Compersion is a well-known term in polyamorous communities that connotes the positive emotion an individual may experience in relation to their partner's relationship with another partner. We know little about this emotion or about the factors that facilitate or inhibit its expression. The lack of a standardized measure for compersion has likely contributed to its neglect in the empirical literature. We sought to remedy this gap by creating a reliable and valid quantitative scale, The COMPERSe (Classifying Our Metamour/Partner Emotional Response Scale), through a multi-stage, bottom-up process grounded in a qualitative understanding of consensually non-monogamous (CNM) individuals' lived experience of compersion. This paper describes the thematic analysis of qualitative data (n = 44) which underpinned item generation, revision of the item pool based on researcher, practitioner, and community member feedback, exploratory (n = 310) and confirmatory factor analyses (n = 320) to ascertain the factor structure of the data, and examination of convergent and divergent validity. Results supported the use of a three-factor scale (Happiness about Partner/Metamour Relationship, Excitement for New Connections, and Sexual Arousal), which demonstrated excellent internal consistency as well as strong divergent and convergent validity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10508-021-01985-yDOI Listing
May 2021

Does African American Women's Racial Identity Mediate Gendered Racism on Anticipated Relationship Threat?

J Interpers Violence 2019 Aug 27:886260519872300. Epub 2019 Aug 27.

3 Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

The present study examined the question of whether racial identity among African American women mediated the relationship between gendered racism and anticipated relationship threat. Using the Multicultural Assessment Intervention Process (MAIP) framework, we examined the relationship of gendered racism, racial identity, and anticipated relationship threat among a convenience sample of 411 African American women. A structural model was configured with gendered racism directly predicting anticipated relationship threat and racial identity serving as a mediator. Results indicated that greater levels of perceived gendered racism were associated with greater perceptions of anticipated relationship threat. Racial identity was found to not mediate the association with anticipated relationship threat. Individuals with less education experienced higher levels of concern regarding physical safety and controlling behaviors than those with more education. Implications for future relationship threat research with African American women are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0886260519872300DOI Listing
August 2019

Evidence-Based Occupational Hearing Screening I: Modeling the Effects of Real-World Noise Environments on the Likelihood of Effective Speech Communication.

Ear Hear 2018 May/Jun;39(3):436-448

Sacramento State University, Sacramento, California, USA.

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to (1) identify essential hearing-critical job tasks for public safety and law enforcement personnel; (2) determine the locations and real-world noise environments where these tasks are performed; (3) characterize each noise environment in terms of its impact on the likelihood of effective speech communication, considering the effects of different levels of vocal effort, communication distances, and repetition; and (4) use this characterization to define an objective normative reference for evaluating the ability of individuals to perform essential hearing-critical job tasks in noisy real-world environments.

Design: Data from five occupational hearing studies performed over a 17-year period for various public safety agencies were analyzed. In each study, job task analyses by job content experts identified essential hearing-critical tasks and the real-world noise environments where these tasks are performed. These environments were visited, and calibrated recordings of each noise environment were made. The extended speech intelligibility index (ESII) was calculated for each 4-sec interval in each recording. These data, together with the estimated ESII value required for effective speech communication by individuals with normal hearing, allowed the likelihood of effective speech communication in each noise environment for different levels of vocal effort and communication distances to be determined. These likelihoods provide an objective norm-referenced and standardized means of characterizing the predicted impact of real-world noise on the ability to perform essential hearing-critical tasks.

Results: A total of 16 noise environments for law enforcement personnel and eight noise environments for corrections personnel were analyzed. Effective speech communication was essential to hearing-critical tasks performed in these environments. Average noise levels, ranged from approximately 70 to 87 dBA in law enforcement environments and 64 to 80 dBA in corrections environments. The likelihood of effective speech communication at communication distances of 0.5 and 1 m was often less than 0.50 for normal vocal effort. Likelihood values often increased to 0.80 or more when raised or loud vocal effort was used. Effective speech communication at and beyond 5 m was often unlikely, regardless of vocal effort.

Conclusions: ESII modeling of nonstationary real-world noise environments may prove an objective means of characterizing their impact on the likelihood of effective speech communication. The normative reference provided by these measures predicts the extent to which hearing impairments that increase the ESII value required for effective speech communication also decrease the likelihood of effective speech communication. These predictions may provide an objective evidence-based link between the essential hearing-critical job task requirements of public safety and law enforcement personnel and ESII-based hearing assessment of individuals who seek to perform these jobs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AUD.0000000000000547DOI Listing
March 2019

Development and validation of the African American Women's Shifting Scale (AAWSS).

Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol 2016 Jan 6;22(1):11-25. Epub 2015 Apr 6.

Office of Diversity & Inclusion.

Objective: The purpose of this research was to develop and validate an instrument to measure shifting or self-altering strategies among African American women.

Method: A 13-item instrument was developed to measure aspects of shifting phenomena based on the empirical literature, feedback from focus groups, and cultural experts. The initial validation study, using principal axis analysis, was conducted with a national sample of 318 African American women. A second independent national sample of 190 African American women provided data for a confirmatory factor analysis.

Results: Results indicated that the inventory was composed of the following 3 factors: Strong Black Woman, Awareness of Shifting Behavior, and Sensitivity to the Perceptions of Blacks.

Conclusions: A structural model was developed based on the Multicultural Assessment-Intervention Process (MAIP) framework that allowed for the exploration of the shifting construct. Implications for future research are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cdp0000039DOI Listing
January 2016

Predictors of self-perceived cultural competence among children's mental health providers.

Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol 2014 Jul;20(3):324-35

Institutional Research, University of La Verne.

Based on empirical research and predictions from the Multicultural Assessment-Intervention Process model, the racial attitudes, ethnic identity, and acculturation of a national sample of 371 child mental health service providers were assessed as possible predictors of practitioner self-perceived cultural competence. It was hypothesized that ethnic identity and racial attitudes would each directly affect self-perceived cultural competence and that acculturation and racial attitudes would mediate the effect of ethnic identity. The results indicated that ethnic identity exerted a direct effect on self-perceived cultural competence and that this effect was partially mediated by respondents' racial attitudes; however, acculturation had no significant role as a mediator. The results are discussed within the context of the Multicultural Assessment-Intervention Process model and implications for providing culturally competent services to children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0035762DOI Listing
July 2014

Self-related consequences of death fear and death denial.

Death Stud 2014 Jul-Dec;38(6-10):418-22. Epub 2013 Nov 13.

a Department of Psychology , University of Essex , Colchester , UK.

This study explores self-related outcomes (e.g., esteem, self-concept clarity, existential well-being) as a function of the interaction between self-reported levels of death fear and death denial. Consistent with the idea that positive existential growth can come from individuals facing, rather than denying, their mortality (Cozzolino, 2006 ), the authors observed that not fearing and denying death can bolster important positive components of the self. That is, individuals low in death denial and death fear evidenced an enhanced self that is valued, clearly conceived, efficacious, and that has meaning and purpose.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2013.780110DOI Listing
February 2015

Inflammatory bowel disease and acne.

Am J Gastroenterol 2009 Sep;104(9):2370

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2009.284DOI Listing
September 2009

Increasing dental care for very young children: what can training accomplish?

J Calif Dent Assoc 2008 Dec;36(12):931-40

Barbara Aved Associates, Sacramento, USA.

Too few dental providers feel comfortable or are keen on seeing young children in their practices, and training in oral health has generally ignored the dental component of early childhood. Evaluation of California's $7 million First Smiles showed increased knowledge and skills among 3,369 dental professionals trained. Positive practice changes included increasing willingness to see more 1-5 aged children, including special needs; seeing children for a first visit by age 1; and conferring with a pregnant patient's medical provider.
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December 2008

Greed, death, and values: from terror management to transcendence management theory.

Pers Soc Psychol Bull 2004 Mar;30(3):278-92

Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Research supporting terror management theory has shown that participants facing their death (via mortality salience) exhibit more greed than do control participants. The present research attempts to distinguish mortality salience from other forms of mortality awareness. Specifically, the authors look to reports of near-death experiences and posttraumatic growth which reveal that many people who nearly die come to view seeking wealth and possession as empty and meaningless. Guided by these reports, a manipulation called death reflection was generated. In Study 1, highly extrinsic participants who experienced death reflection exhibited intrinsic behavior. In Study 2, the manipulation was validated, and in Study 3, death reflection and mortality salience manipulations were compared. Results showed that mortality salience led highly extrinsic participants to manifest greed, whereas death reflection again generated intrinsic, unselfish behavior. The construct of value orientation is discussed along with the contrast between death reflection manipulation and mortality salience.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167203260716DOI Listing
March 2004