Publications by authors named "Lawrence Budnick"

12 Publications

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Tuberculosis Screening, Testing, and Treatment of US Health Care Personnel: ACOEM and NTCA Joint Task Force on Implementation of the 2019 MMWR Recommendations.

J Occup Environ Med 2020 07;62(7):e355-e369

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Elk Grove, Illinois.

: On May 17, 2019, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Tuberculosis Controllers Association issued new Recommendations for Tuberculosis Screening, Testing, and Treatment of Health Care Personnel, United States, 2019, updating the health care personnel-related sections of the Guidelines for Preventing the Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Health-Care Settings, 2005. This companion document offers the collective effort and experience of occupational health, infectious disease, and public health experts from major academic and public health institutions across the United States and expands on each section of the 2019 recommendations to provide clarifications, explanations, and considerations that go beyond the 2019 recommendations to answer questions that may arise and to offer strategies for implementation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000001904DOI Listing
July 2020

Work-Related Trypanosoma cruzi Exposures.

J Occup Environ Med 2019 10;61(10):e429-e431

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Department of Medicine, Occupational Medicine Service, Newark, New Jersey Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Department of Medicine, Occupational Medicine Service, Newark, New Jersey Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention, Parasitic Diseases Branch, Atlanta, Georgia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000001674DOI Listing
October 2019

Influenza immunization among resident physicians in an urban teaching hospital.

Am J Infect Control 2016 Apr 18;44(4):491-3. Epub 2015 Dec 18.

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Allergic and Immunologic Diseases, Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ.

We surveyed resident physicians (RPs) at an academic medical center to determine the rate of influenza vaccination and reasons for nonvaccination. The overall self-reported immunization rate of RPs in 2013-2014 was 76.7%, and the most common reason for not being vaccinated was lack of time to get immunized (38.6%). Making flu vaccination available in training hospitals and at convenient locations and times that take into account varying work schedules may increase compliance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2015.10.029DOI Listing
April 2016

Regarding Health Awareness Days.

Am J Public Health 2015 Oct 13;105(10):e9. Epub 2015 Aug 13.

Lawrence D. Budnick is with Rutgers University, New Jersey Medical School, and the Occupational Medicine Service, Newark, NJ.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2015.302833DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4566523PMC
October 2015

Influenza vaccine: immunization rates, knowledge, and attitudes of resident physicians in an urban teaching hospital.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2005 Nov;26(11):867-73

Department of Pediatrics, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, MSB, Room F570, Newark, NJ 07101-1709, USA.

Background: Because resident physicians (RPs) frequently have direct patient contact, those who are unimmunized against influenza potentially subject patients to unnecessary risk of infection.

Objective: To determine the rates of, knowledge regarding, and attitudes toward influenza immunization among RPs. We hypothesized that rates of and knowledge about influenza immunization did not differ between primary care (PC) and non-PC RPs.

Methods: A self-administered, anonymous questionnaire distributed to a convenience sample of 300 RPs (150 PC and 150 non-PC). The questionnaire requested influenza immunization status in the 2003-2004 and previous seasons and factors influencing respondents' decisions whether to be immunized. It included a 20-item test of knowledge about influenza immunization.

Results: Two hundred five (68.3%) of 300 distributed questionnaires (196 that were evaluable) were returned. Response rates of PC and non-PC RPs did not differ (P = .79). The overall immunization rate of RPs in 2003-2004 was 38.3% and rates did not differ between PC (38.9%) and non-PC (37.6%) RPs. RPs most often cited "self-protection" as a reason for electing (93.3%) and "lack of time" for declining (47.1%) influenza immunization. Their ability to correctly answer questions about influenza immunization varied; their mean knowledge score was 13.7 (perfect = 20). PC and non-PC trainees did not differ by knowledge score (P = .48). However, RPs "ever vaccinated" had a higher knowledge score than those "never vaccinated" (P = .01).

Conclusion: RPs have low immunization rates and significant gaps in knowledge regarding influenza immunization. These problems should be addressed during their training by education on the importance, effectiveness, and safety of influenza vaccine for them and their patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/502510DOI Listing
November 2005

Costs of implementing and maintaining a tuberculin skin test program in hospitals and health departments.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2003 Nov;24(11):814-20

Outbreak Investigations Team, Surveillance, Epidemiology and Outbreak Investigations Branch, Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, National Center for HIV STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

Objective: To determine (1) the annual costs of implementing and maintaining tuberculin skin test (TST) programs at participating study sites, (2) the cost of the TST program per healthcare worker (HCW), and (3) the outcomes of the TST programs, including the proportion of HCWs with a documented TST conversion and the proportion who accepted and completed treatment for latent TB infection, before and after the implementation of staffTRAK-TB software (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA).

Design: Cost analysis in which costs for salaries, training, supplies, radiography, and data analysis were collected for two 12-month periods (before and after the implementation of staffTRAK-TB).

Setting: Four hospitals (two university and two city) and two health departments (one small county and one big city).

Results: The annual cost of implementing and maintaining a TST program ranged from dollars 66,564 to dollars 332,728 for hospitals and dollars 92,886 to dollars 291,248 for health departments. The cost of the TST program per HCW ranged from dollars 41 to dollars 362 for hospitals and dollars 176 to dollars 264 for health departments.

Conclusions: Costs associated with implementing and maintaining a TST program varied widely among the participating study sites, both before and after the implementation of staffTRAK-TB. Compliance with the TB infection control guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may require a substantial investment in personnel time, effort, and commitment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/502142DOI Listing
November 2003
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