Publications by authors named "Laurie E Bernstein"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Impact on Isoleucine and Valine Supplementation When Decreasing Use of Medical Food in the Nutritional Management of Methylmalonic Acidemia.

Nutrients 2020 Feb 13;12(2). Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Department of Pediatrics Section of Clinical Genetics and Metabolism, Aurora, Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.

Background: Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder treated with precursor-free medical food while limiting natural protein. This retrospective chart review was to determine if there was a relationship between medical food, valine (VAL) and/or isoleucine (ILE) supplementation, total protein intake, and plasma amino acid profiles. Methods A chart review, of patients aged 31 days or older with MMA treated with dietary intervention and supplementation of VAL and/or ILE and followed at the Children's Hospital Colorado Inherited Metabolic Diseases Clinic. Dietary prescriptions and plasma amino acid concentrations were obtained at multiple time points.

Results: Baseline mean total protein intake for five patients was 198% of Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) with 107% natural protein and 91% medical food. Following intervention, total protein intake ( = 0.0357), protein from medical food ( = 0.0142), and leucine (LEU) from medical food ( = 0.0276) were lower, with no significant change in natural protein intake ( = 0.2036). At baseline, 80% of patients received VAL supplementation and 100% received ILE supplementation. After intervention, only one of the cohort remained on supplementation. There was no statistically significant difference in plasma propiogenic amino acid concentrations.

Conclusions: Decreased intake of LEU from medical food allowed for discontinuation of amino acid supplementation, while meeting the RDA for protein.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12020473DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7071216PMC
February 2020

International clinical guideline for the management of classical galactosemia: diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.

J Inherit Metab Dis 2017 03 17;40(2):171-176. Epub 2016 Nov 17.

Department of Pediatrics, Emma Children's Hospital, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Classical galactosemia (CG) is an inborn error of galactose metabolism. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment and follow-up of CG are currently lacking, and treatment and follow-up have been demonstrated to vary worldwide. To provide patients around the world the same state-of-the-art in care, members of The Galactosemia Network (GalNet) developed an evidence-based and internationally applicable guideline for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of CG. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system. A systematic review of the literature was performed, after key questions were formulated during an initial GalNet meeting. The first author and one of the working group experts conducted data-extraction. All experts were involved in data-extraction. Quality of the body of evidence was evaluated and recommendations were formulated. Whenever possible recommendations were evidence-based, if not they were based on expert opinion. Consensus was reached by multiple conference calls, consensus rounds via e-mail and a final consensus meeting. Recommendations addressing diagnosis, dietary treatment, biochemical monitoring, and follow-up of clinical complications were formulated. For all recommendations but one, full consensus was reached. A 93 % consensus was reached on the recommendation addressing age at start of bone density screening. During the development of this guideline, gaps of knowledge were identified in most fields of interest, foremost in the fields of treatment and follow-up.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10545-016-9990-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5306419PMC
March 2017

A re-evaluation of life-long severe galactose restriction for the nutrition management of classic galactosemia.

Mol Genet Metab 2014 Jul 2;112(3):191-7. Epub 2014 May 2.

Division of Genetics and Genomics, Metabolism Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address:

The galactose-restricted diet is life-saving for infants with classic galactosemia. However, the benefit and extent of dietary galactose restriction required after infancy remain unclear and variation exists in practice. There is a need for evidence-based recommendations to better standardize treatment for this disorder. This paper reviews the association between diet treatment and outcomes in classic galactosemia and evaluates the contribution of food sources of free galactose in the diet. Recommendations include allowing all fruits, vegetables, legumes, soy products that are not fermented, various aged cheeses and foods containing caseinates. Further research directions are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ymgme.2014.04.004DOI Listing
July 2014

Galactose content of legumes, caseinates, and some hard cheeses: implications for diet treatment of classic galactosemia.

J Agric Food Chem 2014 Feb 3;62(6):1397-402. Epub 2014 Feb 3.

Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison , 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705, United States.

There are inconsistent reports on the lactose and/or galactose content of some foods traditionally restricted from the diet for classic galactosemia. Therefore, samples of cheeses, caseinates, and canned black, pinto, kidney, and garbanzo beans were analyzed for free galactose content using HPLC with refractive index or pulsed amperometric detection. Galactose concentrations in several hard and aged cheeses and three mild/medium Cheddars, produced by smaller local dairies, was <10 mg/100 g sample compared to 55.4 mg/100 g sample in four sharp Cheddars produced by a multinational producer. Galactose in sodium and calcium caseinate ranged from undetectable to 95.5 mg/100 g sample. Free galactose level in garbanzo beans was lower than previously reported at 24.6 mg/100 g sample; black beans contained 5.3 mg/100 g, and free galactose was not detected in red kidney or pinto beans. These data provide a basis for recommending inclusion of legumes, caseinate-containing foods, and some aged hard cheeses that had been previously restricted in the diet for individuals with galactosemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf404995aDOI Listing
February 2014