Publications by authors named "Laurent C Delli-Bovi"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Global hypermethylation in fetal cortex of Down syndrome due to DNMT3L overexpression.

Hum Mol Genet 2016 05 23;25(9):1714-27. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

Department of Neurology and

Down syndrome (DS) is caused by a triplication of chromosome 21 (HSA21). Increased oxidative stress, decreased neurogenesis and synaptic dysfunction from HSA21 gene overexpression are thought to cause mental retardation, dementia and seizure in this disorder. Recent epigenetic studies have raised the possibility that DNA methylation has significant effects on DS neurodevelopment. Here, we performed methylome profiling in normal and DS fetal cortices and observed a significant hypermethylation in ∼4% of probes in the DS samples compared with age-matched normals. The probes with differential methylation were distributed across all chromosomes, with no enrichment on HSA21. Functional annotation and pathway analyses showed that genes in the ubiquitination pathway were significantly altered, including: BRCA1, TSPYL5 and PEX10 HSA21 located DNMT3L was overexpressed in DS neuroprogenitors, and this overexpression increased the promoter methylation of TSPYL5 potentially through DNMT3B, and decreased its mRNA expression. DNMT3L overexpression also increased mRNA levels for TP53 and APP, effectors of TSPYL5 Furthermore, DNMT3L overexpression increased APP and PSD95 expression in differentiating neurons, whereas DNMT3LshRNA could partially rescue the APP and PSD95 up-regulation in DS cells. These results provide some of the first mechanistic insights into causes for epigenetic changes in DS, leading to modification of genes relevant for the DS neural endophenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddw043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4986328PMC
May 2016

OLIG2 over-expression impairs proliferation of human Down syndrome neural progenitors.

Hum Mol Genet 2012 May 17;21(10):2330-40. Epub 2012 Feb 17.

Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Mental retardation and early Alzheimer's disease (AD) have generally been attributed to progressive neuronal loss in the developing and mature Down syndrome (DS) brain. However, reduced neuronal production during development could also contribute to the smaller brain size and simplified gyral patterning seen in this disorder. Here, we show impairments in proliferation within the ventricular zone (VZ) of early DS fetal cortex and in cultured early passage DS human neural progenitors (HNPs). We find that the reduced proliferative rates correspond temporally with increased expression of the chromosome 21 (HSA21) associated, oligodendrocyte transcription factor OLIG2 at 14-18 weeks gestational age (GA) (period of neurogenesis). Moreover, the DS HNPs adopt more oligodendrocyte-specific features including increased oligodendrocyte marker expression, as well as a reduction in KCNA3 potassium channel expression and function. We further show that OLIG2 inhibition or over-expression regulates potassium channel expression levels and that activation or inhibition of these channels influences the rate of progenitor proliferation. Finally, neural progenitors from Olig2 over-expressing transgenic mice exhibit these same impairments in proliferation and potassium channel expression. These findings suggest that OLIG2 over-expression inhibits neural progenitor proliferation through changes in potassium channel activity, thereby contributing to the reduced neuronal numbers and brain size in DS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/dds052DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3335315PMC
May 2012

S100B and APP promote a gliocentric shift and impaired neurogenesis in Down syndrome neural progenitors.

PLoS One 2011 11;6(7):e22126. Epub 2011 Jul 11.

Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Down syndrome (DS) is a developmental disorder associated with mental retardation (MR) and early onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). These CNS phenotypes are attributed to ongoing neuronal degeneration due to constitutive overexpression of chromosome 21 (HSA21) genes. We have previously shown that HSA21 associated S100B contributes to oxidative stress and apoptosis in DS human neural progenitors (HNPs). Here we show that DS HNPs isolated from fetal frontal cortex demonstrate not only disturbances in redox states within the mitochondria and increased levels of progenitor cell death but also transition to more gliocentric progenitor phenotypes with a consequent reduction in neuronogenesis. HSA21 associated S100B and amyloid precursor protein (APP) levels are simultaneously increased within DS HNPs, their secretions are synergistically enhanced in a paracrine fashion, and overexpressions of these proteins disrupt mitochondrial membrane potentials and redox states. HNPs show greater susceptibility to these proteins as compared to neurons, leading to cell death. Ongoing inflammation through APP and S100B overexpression further promotes a gliocentric HNPs phenotype. Thus, the loss in neuronal numbers seen in DS is not merely due to increased HNPs cell death and neurodegeneration, but also a fundamental gliocentric shift in the progenitor pool that impairs neuronal production.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0022126PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3133657PMC
November 2011

Generation of neural stem cells from discarded human fetal cortical tissue.

J Vis Exp 2011 May 25(51). Epub 2011 May 25.

Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside along the ventricular zone neuroepithelium during the development of the cortical plate. These early progenitors ultimately give rise to intermediate progenitors and later, the various neuronal and glial cell subtypes that form the cerebral cortex. The capacity to generate and expand human NSCs (so called neurospheres) from discarded normal fetal tissue provides a means with which to directly study the functional aspects of normal human NSC development. This approach can also be directed toward the generation of NSCs from known neurological disorders, thereby affording the opportunity to identify disease processes that alter progenitor proliferation, migration and differentiation. We have focused on identifying pathological mechanisms in human Down syndrome NSCs that might contribute to the accelerated Alzheimer's disease phenotype. Neither in vivo nor in vitro mouse models can replicate the identical repertoire of genes located on human chromosome 21. Here we use a simple and reliable method to isolate Down syndrome NSCs from aborted human fetal cortices and grow them in culture. The methodology provides specific aspects of harvesting the tissue, dissection with limited anatomical landmarks, cell sorting, plating and passaging of human NSCs. We also provide some basic protocols for inducing differentiation of human NSCs into more selective cell subtypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/2681DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3197109PMC
May 2011

Emergency contraception knowledge after a community education campaign.

Contraception 2007 Nov 21;76(5):366-71. Epub 2007 Sep 21.

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Background: This study evaluates the effectiveness of a community education campaign in the Boston community of Jamaica Plain conducted by the Massachusetts Emergency Contraception (EC) Network aimed at improving public knowledge of EC.

Study Design: Pre- and postintervention surveys of reproductive-age women were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the community education campaign. Knowledge of EC was compared before and after the intervention using surveys of community-based samples of women.

Results: One hundred eighty-eight and 290 women participated in the preintervention and postintervention surveys, respectively. Following the intervention, women were significantly more likely to have heard of EC (91% vs. 82%, p=.007), know the mechanism of action of EC (49% vs. 39%, p=.04), have discussed EC with a health care provider (38% vs. 25%, p=.003) and have received an advance prescription for EC (22% vs. 12%, p=.004), as well as were more likely to use EC in the future if needed (79% vs. 63%, p=.0002).

Conclusion: This grassroots-based community education campaign on EC was effective in improving EC knowledge in this Boston community.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2007.07.007DOI Listing
November 2007

Fetal cell-free plasma DNA concentrations in maternal blood are stable 24 hours after collection: analysis of first- and third-trimester samples.

Clin Chem 2003 Jan;49(1):195-8

Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Tufts-New England Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1373/49.1.195DOI Listing
January 2003