Publications by authors named "Laurent Bali"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Early versus delayed invasive strategy for intermediate- and high-risk acute coronary syndromes managed without P2Y receptor inhibitor pretreatment: Design and rationale of the EARLY randomized trial.

Clin Cardiol 2018 Jan 22;41(1):5-12. Epub 2018 Jan 22.

Aix-Marseille Université, AP-HM, Unité INSERM 1076, Unité de Soins Intensifs Cardiologiques, Department of Cardiology, Hôpital Nord, Marseille, France.

According to recent literature, pretreatment with a P2Y ADP receptor antagonist before coronary angiography appears no longer suitable in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) due to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. Optimal delay of the invasive strategy in this specific context is unknown. We hypothesize that without P2Y ADP receptor antagonist pretreatment, a very early invasive strategy may be beneficial. The EARLY trial (Early or Delayed Revascularization for Intermediate- and High-Risk Non-ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes?) is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label, 2-parallel-group study that plans to enroll 740 patients. Patients are eligible if the diagnosis of intermediate- or high-risk NSTE-ACS is made and an invasive strategy intended. Patients are randomized in a 1:1 ratio. In the control group, a delayed strategy is adopted, with the coronary angiography taking place between 12 and 72 hours after randomization. In the experimental group, a very early invasive strategy is performed within 2 hours. A loading dose of a P2Y ADP receptor antagonist is given at the time of intervention in both groups. Recruitment began in September 2016 (n = 558 patients as of October 2017). The primary endpoint is the composite of cardiovascular death and recurrent ischemic events at 1 month. The EARLY trial aims to demonstrate the superiority of a very early invasive strategy compared with a delayed strategy in intermediate- and high-risk NSTE-ACS patients managed without P2Y ADP receptor antagonist pretreatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/clc.22852DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6490048PMC
January 2018

Coronary wall characteristics after myocardial infarction without significant coronary angiographic lesion: an intravascular ultrasound study.

Acta Cardiol 2010 Dec;65(6):627-30

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Marseille, France.

Aim: Coronary of angiography may be normal or without significant lesion after myocardial infarction (MI) in about 10% of cases. Our aim was to evaluate intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) findings, mainly remodelling, in patients with normal or near normal angiography early after MI.

Methods And Results: We prospectively included 17 patients, admitted for STEMI or non-STEMI with no lesion > 30% (QCA) on early coronary angiography. Culprit vessel was defined by evidence of a thrombus in a proximal segment, distal embolization or focal akinesia of the left ventricle. Negative remodelling (NR) was defined as a remodelling index (lesion/reference external elastic membrane cross sectional area [CSA]) < 0.95, no remodelling as between 0.95-1.05, and positive remodelling (PR) as > 1.05. IVUS could identify a short, single, minor, eccentric and hypoechogenic lesion in all patients, of proximal location in 76.4% cases. PR was observed in only 1 patient (5.9%).

Conclusion: A discrete lesion was observed in all patients with apparently normal arteries. Although previous reports have shown an association between PR and vulnerability, in our study PR was unusual. Our study supports the hypothesis that in some patients, vulnerability may appear very early in the natural history of coronary artery disease before any vessel remodelling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/ac.65.6.2059858DOI Listing
December 2010

Clopidogrel response: head-to-head comparison of different platelet assays to identify clopidogrel non responder patients after coronary stenting.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2010 Jan 25;103(1):39-45. Epub 2010 Jan 25.

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Marseille, France.

Objectives: We investigated the agreement between different platelet tests to identify clopidogrel non response.

Background: Biological definition of clopidogrel non response remains controversial. Different platelet tests have been linked with recurrent ischemic events and proposed for daily practice.

Methods: We prospectively investigated the agreement of platelet tests to isolate clopidogrel non response in patients receiving high 150 mg clopidogrel maintenance dose after coronary stenting. Clopidogrel response was assessed with ADP-induced aggregation (ADP-Ag) (non response if >70%), Platelet reactivity index VASP (PRI VASP) (non response if >50%) and Verify Now Point-of-care assay (VN) (non response if PRU > 240 AU).

Results: Seventy consecutive patients were included. The rates of non-responders were respectively: 13% (n = 9) with the ADP-Ag, 39% (n = 27) with the PRI VASP and 33% (n = 23) with the VN. We observed significant correlation between different platelet tests assessing clopidogrel response: r = 0.55 (p < 0.0001) for ADP-Ag and PRI VASP, r = 0.64 (p < 0.0001) for ADP-Ag and VN and r = 0.59 (p < 0.0001) for PRI VASP and VN. However, using the most common thresholds, the agreement between the difference tests was poor: 0.35 for ADP-Ag and PRI VASP, 0.36 for ADP-Ag and VN and 0.46 for PRI VASP and VN.

Conclusion: This study showed that assessment of platelet function inhibition by clopidogrel is highly test-specific. Indeed, our results demonstrated a poor agreement between different platelet assays and suggested that identification of clopidogrel non responders is test-dependent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2009.11.004DOI Listing
January 2010

Predictive values of post-treatment adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein index for stent thrombosis after acute coronary syndrome in clopidogrel-treated patients.

Am J Cardiol 2009 Oct;104(8):1078-82

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Marseille, France.

A low response to clopidogrel has been associated with an increased risk of stent thrombosis. However, the definition of a nonresponse to clopidogrel remains controversial, and different tests have been used to assess the clopidogrel response. The present study was designed to assess the predictive value of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation (ADP-Ag) and the Platelet Reactivity Index of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein for the occurrence of stent thrombosis in patients admitted for non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. A total of 598 consecutive patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing coronary stenting were prospectively included. They received 600 mg of clopidogrel >or=12 hours before percutaneous coronary intervention. Acute or subacute definite or probable stent thrombosis occurred in 11 patients (1.8%). These patients had significantly greater ADP-Ag compared to patients free of stent thrombosis (68 +/- 14% vs 56 +/- 19%, p = 0.002) but only a trend toward a greater Platelet Reactivity Index of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (62 +/- 14% vs 53 +/- 23%, p = 0.19). The construction of receiver operating characteristic curves to examine the most predictive value of ADP-Ag for stent thrombosis gave a threshold of ADP-Ag of >67% to identify low responders. These patients were at a greater risk of stent thrombosis than the clopidogrel responders (4.3% vs 0.8%, odds ratio 5.8, 95% confidence interval 1.9 to 24.6, p = 0.003). In conclusion, in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, ADP-Ag is a good parameter to identify clopidogrel nonresponders who are at increased risk of stent thrombosis, with a cutoff value of ADP-Ag of >67%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.06.007DOI Listing
October 2009

Comparison of omeprazole and pantoprazole influence on a high 150-mg clopidogrel maintenance dose the PACA (Proton Pump Inhibitors And Clopidogrel Association) prospective randomized study.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2009 Sep;54(13):1149-53

Département de Cardiologie, CHU Timone, Marseille, France.

Objectives: This study sought to compare the effect of 2 proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on platelet response to clopidogrel after coronary stenting for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE ACS).

Background: Use of omeprazole has been reported to significantly decrease the clopidogrel antiplatelet effect because of cytochrome P450 interaction. Because all PPIs are metabolized by CYP2C19, but to a varying degree, we hypothesized that the reported negative omeprazole-clopidogrel drug interaction may not be caused by a class effect.

Methods: A total of 104 patients undergoing coronary stenting for NSTE ACS were prospectively included and randomized to omeprazole or pantoprazole 20 mg. They received at discharge 75-mg aspirin and 150-mg clopidogrel. Platelet reactivity index (PRI) vasoactive stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) was used to assess clopidogrel response and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation for platelet reactivity (ADP-Ag).

Results: After 1 month, patients receiving pantoprazole had a significantly better platelet response to clopidogrel as assessed with the PRI VASP: 36 +/- 20% versus 48 +/- 17% (p = 0.007). We identified more clopidogrel nonresponders in the omeprazole group than in the pantoprazole group: 44% versus 23% (p = 0.04), odds ratio: 2.6 (95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 6.2). Conversely, we did not observe any significant difference in platelet reactivity with ADP-Ag between the omeprazole and pantoprazole groups: 52 +/- 15% and 50 +/- 18%, respectively (p = 0.29).

Conclusions: The present findings suggest the preferential use of pantoprazole compared with omeprazole in patients receiving clopidogrel to avoid any potential negative interaction with CYP2C19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2009.05.050DOI Listing
September 2009

Predictive value of post-treatment platelet reactivity for occurrence of post-discharge bleeding after non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome. Shifting from antiplatelet resistance to bleeding risk assessment?

EuroIntervention 2009 Aug;5(3):325-9

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Marseille, France.

Aims: We assessed prospectively the association between occurrence of post-discharge non-CABG-related TIMI major and minor bleeding and post-treatment platelet reactivity in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE ACS).

Methods And Results: Five hundred and ninety-seven consecutive patients admitted with NSTE ACS were prospectively included. Between hospital discharge and one month follow-up, we observed 16 (2.7%) non-CABG-related TIMI haemorrhagic complications including five (0.84%) major and 11 (1.8%) minor bleeds. Patients with bleeding had significantly lower post-treatment values of ADP-induced aggregation (43+/-14% versus. 56+/-19%, p=0.002) and platelet reactivity index VASP (43+/-14% versus 54+/-23%; p=0.04) and a trend for lower values of arachidonic acid-induced aggregation (2.4+/-5.4 versus 13+/-21; p=0.27). After stratification by quartiles based on post-treatment ADP-induced platelet aggregation, we identified patients in the first quartile as hyper-responders with very low post-treatment platelet reactivity, below <40%. The risk of TIMI major and minor bleeding was significantly higher in the first quartile of hyper-responders than in the others quartiles: 10 (6.6%) versus six (1.4%), p=0.001.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that assessment of post-treatment platelet reactivity might be used to detect hyper-responders to antiplatelet therapy with higher risk of non-CABG related bleeding and tailor antiplatelet therapy according to both ischaemic and bleeding risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4244/51DOI Listing
August 2009

Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors improve outcome after coronary stenting in clopidogrel nonresponders: a prospective, randomized study.

JACC Cardiovasc Interv 2008 Dec;1(6):649-53

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Marseille, France.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess, in clopidogrel nonresponders undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the benefit of adjusted antiplatelet therapy with glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa antagonist administration during PCI for 1-month clinical outcome.

Background: Numerous biological studies have reported interindividual variability in platelet response to clopidogrel with clinical relevance, and high post-treatment platelet reactivity (adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation >70%) has been proposed to define nonresponse to clopidogrel. These nonresponders might benefit from tailored antiplatelet therapy.

Methods: One hundred forty-nine clopidogrel nonresponders referred for elective PCI were prospectively included and randomized to "conventional group" (n = 75) or "active group" with GP IIb/IIIa antagonist (n = 74). All patients received 250-mg aspirin and 600-mg clopidogrel before PCI and platelet testing.

Results: The rate of cardiovascular events at 1 month was significantly lower in the "active group" than in the "conventional group": 19% (n = 14) versus 40% (n = 30), p = 0.006, odds ratio: 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.4 to 6.0. No patient in either group had post-procedural Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction major bleeding or required transfusions.

Conclusions: The present study suggested benefit of tailored antiplatelet therapy during elective PCI with GP IIb/IIIa antagonist for clopidogrel nonresponders without increased bleeding risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcin.2008.08.018DOI Listing
December 2008

Aspirin noncompliance is the major cause of "aspirin resistance" in patients undergoing coronary stenting.

Am Heart J 2009 May;157(5):889-93

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Marseille, France.

Objectives: We investigated the hypothesis that biological aspirin "resistance" may often be related to noncompliance in patients undergoing coronary stenting.

Background: Premature discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy has been identified as a major risk factor for stent thrombosis and prior aspirin withdrawal has been associated with poor prognosis after acute coronary syndrome.

Methods: We prospectively investigated the occurrence of aspirin noncompliance in 136 consecutive patients undergoing coronary stenting receiving aspirin 75 mg daily. We analyzed posttreatment maximal intensity of arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation (AA-Ag) during hospitalization after controlled intake of aspirin and 1 month after hospital discharge. After 1 month, all "nonresponders" received controlled aspirin 75 mg and assessment of response was repeated. Aspirin nonresponse was defined by AA-Ag >30%.

Results: During inhospital period, the range of AA-Ag varied from 0% to 34% with a mean value of 7.5% +/- 10%, and 4 patients (3%) were classified as nonresponders. One month after discharge, AA-Ag of the population was significantly higher than during the hospital phase (15.3 +/- 23 vs 7.5 +/- 10%, P = .0004), and 19 patients (14%) were identified as nonresponders. After controlled administration of aspirin, all but one of these nonresponders became responders and were identified as patients with noncompliance rather than biological resistance.

Conclusion: Aspirin resistance is rare in compliant patients using methods that directly indicate the degree of platelet cyclooxygenase inhibition. More than 10% of patients receiving aspirin for coronary stenting are noncompliant for aspirin therapy during the first month after stenting. These results suggest a need for improved education of these patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ahj.2009.02.013DOI Listing
May 2009

An unusual "winter case" of myocarditis.

Int J Cardiol 2011 May 8;148(3):e68-9. Epub 2009 Apr 8.

Myocardial injury from moderate to severe carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is common. We reported a case of acute myocarditis related to CO poisoning in a 34 year-old man confirmed by normal coronary angiography, diffuse sub-epicardial late enhancement at MRI and COHb level of 25%.The patient was treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy with favourable clinical evolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2009.03.010DOI Listing
May 2011

Index of Microcirculatory Resistance: a new effective invasive tool to assess reperfusion after primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

Int J Cardiol 2011 Apr 23;148(1):e19-20. Epub 2009 Feb 23.

Assessment of myocardial reperfusion during primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction remains challenging. The pressure wire-derived Index of Microcirculatory Resistance (IMR) is a parameter reflecting the microcirculation status. We illustrated with two cases the accuracy of the IMR in the setting of STEMI to predict myocardial damage as well as LV function recovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2009.01.061DOI Listing
April 2011

Delayed occurrence of complete heart block after ethanol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

Int J Cardiol 2011 Mar 20;147(2):e32-4. Epub 2009 Feb 20.

Ethanol septal ablation has emerged as a less invasive alternative to surgical myomectomy for treatment of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). The procedure has very low mortality, but complete heart block (CHB) is a common complication. Prior studies suggested existence of baseline characteristics, ECG features and procedural risk factors, which are highly predictor of CHB requiring permanent pacemaker after ethanol septal ablation. CHB is often preceded by postprocedure conduction abnormalities and generally develops within 48 h after ethanol ablation. We present a unique case of a patient with HOCM who developed a CHB on 8th day postprocedure without preceding conduction abnormalities or other classic risk factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijcard.2009.01.048DOI Listing
March 2011

Prognostic value of ischaemia-modified albumin in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2008 Oct 6;101(10):645-51. Epub 2008 Nov 6.

Department of Cardiology, CHU La-Timone, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13005 Marseille, France.

Background: Ischaemia-modified albumin (IMA) is a new sensitive diagnostic biochemical marker of myocardial ischaemia. The purpose of the study was to analyse the prognostic value of IMA in patients admitted for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS).

Methods: Consecutive patients admitted for NSTE ACS in our institution were prospectively included. IMA, cardiac troponin I (TnI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in all patients within 3h of last chest pain. The clinical combined endpoint was major adverse cardiac events (MACE) including cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) and recurrent ischaemia leading to urgent revascularization. The independent prognostic impact of IMA on occurrence of the combined endpoint during hospitalization and at 1 year was tested by a logistic regression model and was systematically adjusted for other known clinical and biological predictors.

Results: Seventy-nine patients were enrolled. Nine (11.4%) patients experienced the combined endpoint during hospitalization and 16 (20.2%) during 1-year follow-up. Median IMA level was significantly higher in patients with MACE during hospitalization (115 [93-126]U/mL versus 100 [42-138]U/mL; p=0.007) and at 1 year (114 [93-126]U/mL versus 97 [42-138]U/mL; p<0.001). After adjustment for conventional prognostic risk factors, IMA remained an independent predictor of MACE both during hospitalization (odds ratio [OR]: 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.16; p=0.03) and at 1 year (hazards ratio [HR]: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.03-1.12; p=0.003).

Conclusion: Baseline levels of IMA were associated with both short- and long-term cardiovascular (CV) events in patients admitted for NSTE ACS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2008.09.005DOI Listing
October 2008

Effect of increased aspirin dose after stenting in association with ClOpidogrel: the FIASCO randomized study.

Thromb Res 2009 May 5;124(1):33-6. Epub 2008 Nov 5.

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Marseille, 13385 France.

Background: Increased doses of antiplatelet therapy have been proposed to overcome the variability of response. However, the chronic dose of aspirin after DES remains controversial.

Methods And Results: We assessed in a prospective and randomized study the benefit of higher dose of aspirin, in association with clopidogrel, on aspirin response and non COX-specific platelet testing in patients receiving Drug Eluting Stent (DES) for stable angina pectoris. 50 consecutive patients receiving DES for stable angina pectoris were prospectively included. They received loading dose of 250 mg aspirin and 600 mg clopidogrel and antiplatelet response was assessed with Arachidonic Acid-induced aggregation (AA-Ag) and ADP-induced aggregation (ADP-Ag) for aspirin and clopidogrel response respectively. Patients were randomized to either 75 or 160 mg of aspirin with 150 mg clopidogrel and platelet testing were repeated one month after hospital discharge. The two groups (aspirin "75 mg" or "160 mg") had no difference for aspirin response: AA-Ag (5.2 +/- 1.7% vs 6 +/- 2%, p = 0.75) and non COX-specific pathway testing: ADP-Ag (47 +/- 3% vs 49 +/- 4%, p = 0.61).

Conclusion: The present study did not show any benefit of higher dose of aspirin neither on aspirin responsiveness, nor on inhibition of non COX-specific pathway. These data does not support use of higher dose than 75 mg of aspirin in association with clopidogrel in patients receiving DES, especially while higher doses have been associated with increased bleeding risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2008.09.014DOI Listing
May 2009

Relationship between aspirin and clopidogrel responses in acute coronary syndrome and clinical predictors of non response.

Thromb Res 2009 Feb 21;123(4):597-603. Epub 2008 May 21.

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Marseille, 13385 France.

Objectives: We have prospectively investigated the association between aspirin and clopidogrel responses and the clinical predictors of non response.

Methods: 635 Non ST Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome (NSTE ACS) patients were included and received loading doses of 250 mg aspirin and 600 mg clopidogrel. We analyzed post-treatment maximal intensity of arachidonic acid and ADP-induced platelet aggregation (AA-Ag and ADP-Ag) and Platelet Reactivity Index of VAsodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein (PRI VASP). Aspirin and clopidogrel non responses were defined respectively by AA-Ag>30% and ADP-Ag>70%.

Results: Aspirin non responders patients had significantly higher ADP-Ag and PRI VASP than aspirin responders: 63.7+/-15.9% vs 55+/-19% (p=0.0001) and 73.6+/-13.3% vs 53+/-23% (p=0.0001) respectively and the rate of clopidogrel non responders was higher among aspirin non responders than aspirin responders: 36.7% vs 22.7% (p=0.003). In addition, clopidogrel non responders had significantly higher AA-Ag and rate of aspirin non responders than clopidogrel responders: 21.6+/-24% vs 10.3+/-19% (p=0.0001) and 22.8% vs 12.9% (p=0.003) respectively. Age and Body Mass Index (BMI) were significantly associated with non response to Clopidogrel (p=0.035 and 0.02 respectively) and diabetes mellitus by trend (p=0.07).

Conclusion: We observed a relationship between aspirin and clopidogrel non responses and an association between age, BMI and diabetes mellitus and clopidogrel response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2008.04.003DOI Listing
February 2009

High post-treatment platelet reactivity is associated with a high incidence of myonecrosis after stenting for non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes.

Thromb Haemost 2007 Feb;97(2):282-7

Department of Cardiology, CHU Timone, Boulevard Saint Pierre, Marseille, Bouches du rhone, 13005 France.

High post-treatment platelet reactivity (HPPR=adenosine diphosphate [ADP] 10 microM-induced platelet aggregation >70%) identifies low responders to dual antiplatelet therapy with increased risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events after stenting for non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS). This study was designed to compare the incidence of periprocedural myocardial infarction (MI) after stenting for NSTE-ACS patients between non-responders to dual antiplatelet therapy defined by HPPR and normo-responders. One hundred ninety NSTE-ACS consecutive patients undergoing coronary stenting were included in this prospective study. They received 250 mg aspirin and a 600 mg loading dose of clopidogrel at least 12 hours (h) before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A single post-treatment blood sample was obtained before PCI to analyze maximal intensity of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, and troponin levels were analyzed before PCI, and 12 and 24 h after PCI. Troponin I was considered elevated if >0.4 ng/ml. HPPR was present in 22% of patients (n=42). Periprocedural MI occurred significantly more frequently in patients with HPPR than in the normo-responders (43% vs. 24%, p=0.014). After being correlated with recurrent ischemic events after stenting for NSTE-ACS, the HPPR seems to be also a marker of increased risk of periprocedural MI for NSTE-ACS patients.
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February 2007