Publications by authors named "Laurence Solovei"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Complication and lung function impairment prediction using perfusion and computed tomography air trapping (CLIPPCAIR): protocol for the development and validation of a novel multivariable model for the prediction of post-resection lung function.

Ann Transl Med 2021 Jul;9(13):1092

PhyMedExp, CNRS, INSERM, The University of Montpellier, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, France.

Background: Recent advancements in computed tomography (CT) scanning and post processing have provided new means of assessing factors affecting respiratory function. For lung cancer patients requiring resection, and especially those with respiratory comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the ability to predict post-operative lung function is a crucial step in the lung cancer operability assessment. The primary objective of the CLIPPCAIR study is to use novel CT data to develop and validate an algorithm for the prediction of lung function remaining after pneumectomy/lobectomy.

Methods: Two sequential cohorts of non-small cell lung cancer patients requiring a pre-resection CT scan will be recruited at the Montpellier University Hospital, France: a test population (N=60) on which predictive models will be developed, and a further model validation population (N=100). Enrolment will occur during routine pre-surgical consults and follow-up visits will occur 1 and 6 months after pneumectomy/lobectomy. The primary outcome to be predicted is forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) six months after lung resection. The baseline CT variables that will be used to develop the primary multivariable regression model are: expiratory to inspiratory ratios of mean lung density (MLD for the total lung and resected volume), the percentage of voxels attenuating at less than ‒950 HU (PVOX for the total lung and resected volume) and the ratio of iodine concentrations for the resected volume over that of the total lung. The correlation between predicted and real values will be compared to (and is expected to improve upon) that of previously published methods. Secondary analyses will include the prediction of transfer factor for carbon monoxide (TLCO) and complications in a similar fashion. The option to explore further variables as predictors of post-resection lung function or complications is kept open.

Discussion: Current methods for estimating post-resection lung function are imperfect and can add assessments (such as scintigraphy) to the pre-surgical workup. By using CT imaging data in a novel fashion, the results of the CLIPPCAIR study may not only improve such estimates, it may also simplify patient pathways.

Trial Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT03885765).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/atm-21-214DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8339869PMC
July 2021

Combined video-assisted thoracoscopy surgery and posterior midline incision for en bloc resection of non-small-cell lung cancer invading the spine.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2021 Jul 30. Epub 2021 Jul 30.

Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Arnaud de Villeneuve Hospital, Montpellier, France.

Objectives: This article aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a hybrid video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) approach to achieve en bloc lobectomy and spinal resection for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods: Between October 2015 and November 2020, 10 patients underwent VATS anatomical lobectomy and en bloc chest wall and spinal resection through a limited posterior midline incision as a single operation for T4 (vertebral involvement) lung cancer. Nine patients had Pancoast syndrome without vascular involvement and 1 patient had NSCLC of the right lower lobe with invasion of T9 and T10.

Results: There were 5 men and 5 women. The mean age was 61 years (range: 47-74 years). Induction treatment was administered to 9 patients (90%). The average operative time was 315.5 min (range: 250-375 min). The average blood loss was 665 ml (range: 100-2500 ml). Spinal resection was hemivertebrectomy in 6 patients and wedge corpectomy in 4 patients. Complete resection (R0) was achieved in all patients. The average hospitalization stay was 14 days (range: 6-50 days). There was no in-hospital mortality. The mean follow-up was 32.3 months (range: 6-66 months). Six patients (60%) are alive without recurrence.

Conclusions: VATS is feasible and safe to achieve en bloc resection of NSCLC inviding the spine without compromising oncological efficacy. Further experience and longer follow-up are needed to determine if this approach provides any advantages over thoracotomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivab215DOI Listing
July 2021

A combined management with vv-ECMO and independent lung ventilation for asymmetric chest trauma.

Gen Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2021 May 13;69(5):902-905. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Trauma Intensive and Critical Care Unit, Lapeyronie University Hospital, 371 Avenue du Doyen G. Giraud, 34090, Montpellier, France.

Association of independent lung ventilation (ILV) and veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vv-ECMO) may be life-saving therapy in cases of refractory hypoxemia. We report the case of a trauma patient affected by asymmetric hypoxemic lung contusions and massive air leak managed by association of ILV and vv-ECMO. This combined strategy allowed us first to restore physiologic conditions and later to achieve safe thoracic surgery with reduced resection of pulmonary parenchyma. This case highlights the success of a new damage control strategy in extreme cases of persistent air leak with refractory hypoxemia allowing initial vital rescue and a more conservative treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11748-021-01587-4DOI Listing
May 2021

Poor Concordance between Sequential Transbronchial Lung Cryobiopsy and Surgical Lung Biopsy in the Diagnosis of Diffuse Interstitial Lung Diseases.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2019 05;199(10):1249-1256

1 Department of Respiratory Diseases.

The diagnostic concordance between transbronchial lung cryobiopsy (TBLC)-versus surgical lung biopsy (SLB) as the current gold standard-in interstitial lung disease (ILD) cases requiring histology remains controversial. To assess diagnostic concordance between TBLC and SLB sequentially performed in the same patients, the diagnostic yield of both techniques, and subsequent changes in multidisciplinary assessment (MDA) decisions. A two-center prospective study included patients with ILD with a nondefinite usual interstitial pneumonia pattern (on high-resolution computed tomography scan) confirmed at a first MDA. Patients underwent TBLC immediately followed by video-assisted thoracoscopy for SLB at the same anatomical locations. After open reading of both sample types by local pathologists and final diagnosis at a second MDA (MDA2), anonymized TBLC and SLB slides were blindly assessed by an external expert pathologist (T.V.C.). Kappa-concordance coefficients and percentage agreement were computed for: TBLC versus SLB, MDA2 versus TBLC, MDA2 versus SLB, and blinded pathology versus routine pathology. Twenty-one patients were included. The median TBLC biopsy size (longest axis) was 7 mm (interquartile range, 5-8 mm). SLB biopsy sizes averaged 46.1 ± 13.8 mm. Concordance coefficients and percentage agreement were: TBLC versus SLB: κ = 0.22 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01-0.44), percentage agreement = 38% (95% CI, 18-62%); MDA2 versus TBLC: κ = 0.31 (95% CI, 0.06-0.56), percentage agreement = 48% (95% CI, 26-70)%; MDA2 versus SLB: κ = 0.51 (95% CI, 0.27-0.75), percentage agreement = 62% (95% CI, 38-82%); two pneumothoraces (9.5%) were recorded during TBLC. TBLC would have led to a different treatment if SLB was not performed in 11 of 21 (52%) of cases. Pathological results from TBLC and SLB were poorly concordant in the assessment of ILD. SLBs were more frequently concordant with the final diagnosis retained at MDA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201810-1947OCDOI Listing
May 2019

Risk factors for distal stent graft-induced new entry tear after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic dissection.

J Vasc Surg 2019 May 3;69(5):1610-1614. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hôpital A de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France; CHU Montpellier, PhyMedExp, Université de Montpellier, INSERM, CNRS, Montpellier, France.

Objective: A review of the literature was conducted for incidence, outcomes, and risk factors for distal stent graft-induced new entry (SINE) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of aortic dissection.

Methods: The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines.

Results: Seven articles reporting on 1415 patients with thoracic aortic dissection undergoing TEVAR without supplemental distal bare stenting were included. In this cohort, 86 patients were treated for a residual type A aortic dissection and 1329 for a complicated type B aortic dissection. Distal SINE occurred in 112 patients (7.9%). The mean time to identification of distal SINE was 19 ± 7 months. The incidence of distal SINE after TEVAR for type B aortic dissection differed on the basis of whether it was a chronic or acute dissection repair and was, respectively, 12.9% (43/331) and 4.3% (12/273). Successful secondary interventions were performed in 54% of the patients. All the studies analyzing the relationship between distal stent graft oversizing and incidence of distal SINE reported a significantly higher rate of SINE with oversizing.

Conclusions: The successful management of complicated descending thoracic aortic dissections by TEVAR is well established. Whereas distal SINE is relatively frequent, if it does occur, the complication can generally be treated with additional TEVAR without a poor outcome. The main determinant of SINE seems to be excessive distal oversizing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2018.07.086DOI Listing
May 2019

Systematic review of native and graft-related aortic infection outcome managed with orthotopic xenopericardial grafts.

J Vasc Surg 2019 02 24;69(2):614-618. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Hôpital A de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France. Electronic address:

Objective: Limited data are available on the use of xenopericardium in the treatment of native and graft-related aortic infections. The aim of this review was to assess outcomes of neoaortic reconstruction using xenopericardium in this challenging group of patients.

Methods: Studies involving xenopericardial graft reconstruction to treat native and aortic graft infections were systematically searched and reviewed (Embase, Medline, and Cochrane databases) for the period of January 2007 to December 2017.

Results: A total of 4 studies describing 71 patients treated for aortic graft (n = 54) and native aortic (n = 17) infections were included; 25 patients (35%) were operated on in an acute setting. The technical success rate was 100%. The mean 30-day mortality was 25% (range, 7.7%-31%). Only one death (1.4%) was linked to the operator-made pericardial tube graft (acute postoperative bleeding from proximal anastomosis). Septic multiorgan failure was the most common cause of perioperative death (72% [13/18]). Among the 53 patients who survived, only 3 presented with recurrent infection (5.7%), so 70.4% of patients were alive after intervention without evidence of infection (50/71). During follow-up, 2 false aneurysms (3.7% [2/53]), 1 early rupture (1.4% [1/71]), and 2 cases (3.7% [2/53]) of late rupture were reported. Other causes of late deaths unrelated to the aortic xenopericardial repair were not reported in the different series. The early reintervention rate was 1.4% (1/71), treated by open repair for rupture. The late reintervention rate was 7.5% (4/53) with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in three patients (one false aneurysm and two ruptures) and open repair in one patient (one false aneurysm). There were no cases of early or late graft thrombosis. One-year mortality rate was 38% but only 4.2% were related to the aortic repair using orthotopic xenopericardium (one early and two late ruptures).

Conclusions: These data confirm the high morbidity of native and graft-related aortic infections and provide insight into the results of orthotopic xenografts as a treatment alternative. Larger series and longer follow-up will be required to compare the role of operator-made pericardial tube graft with other treatment options in infected fields.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2018.07.072DOI Listing
February 2019

Reply.

Ann Thorac Surg 2016 Feb;101(2):833-4

Thoracic Surgery Department, University Hospital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2015.10.009DOI Listing
February 2016

Chest Wall Vasculopathy in a Patient with Type 1 Neurofibromatosis.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2015 Aug;192(3):e42-3

1 Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Montpellier, Montpellier, France; and.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201502-0229IMDOI Listing
August 2015

Titanium Implant Failure After Chest Wall Osteosynthesis.

Ann Thorac Surg 2015 Jun 24;99(6):1945-52. Epub 2015 Apr 24.

Thoracic Surgery Department, University Hospital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France.

Background: Our objective was to assess potential contributing factors to implant failure (displacement or rupture) after titanium chest wall osteosynthesis.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data and preoperative and postoperative computed tomographic scans of patients undergoing chest wall osteosynthesis with titanium implants: the Stratos or the Matrix Fixation System in two European departments of thoracic surgery. The indications for titanium chest wall osteosynthesis, the type and number of implants, the topography of the reconstruction, surgical site infection, and role of associated flap and mesh were assessed.

Results: Between January 2009 and January 2013, 54 patients underwent osteosynthesis after surgical correction of chest wall deformities (n = 25, 46.2%) or to bridge the defect after tumor removal (n = 29, 53.7%). The topography of osteosynthesis was anterior (n = 20), lateral (n = 3), or posterior (n = 1), an average of 1.9 ± 0.9 implants (range, 1 to 5 implants) being used. A combined mesh restored continuity of the chest wall in 15 patients, and muscle flap coverage was performed in 20. The mean follow-up time was 20.2 ± 8.4 months (range, 3 to 48 months). Among these 54 patients, 24 (44%) experienced an implant failure. Seven (29%) were symptomatic. Broken (n = 20, 83.3%) or displaced (n = 4, 16.7%) implants were removed with or without replacement. In patients with broken or displaced implants, the mean duration without implant failure was 6.6 ± 3.1 months (range, 1 to 12 months). There was a significant relationship between the anterior topography of osteosynthesis and implant failure (p = 0.02).

Conclusions: Long-term follow-up after chest wall osteosynthesis using titanium implants is required, especially in anteriorly placed implants. The high rate of implant failure at 1 year advocates for early removal whenever possible and suggests the need for improvements in design.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2015.02.040DOI Listing
June 2015

Delayed pulmonary arterial hypertension in relation to pulmonary damage score after pneumonectomy under protective ventilation: experimental study.

Eur Surg Res 2013 31;51(3-4):170-80. Epub 2013 Dec 31.

Division of Thoracic Surgery and Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Hospital Arnaud de Villeneuve, France.

Objective: To characterize pulmonary hemodynamic changes in relation to lung injury at 2 time points [48 h (H48) and 168 h (H168)] after pneumonectomy under intraoperative protective ventilation in order to improve postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema (PPE) prevention.

Method: Fifteen pigs (25 ± 1.9 kg) were randomly allocated to nonsurgical (control, n = 5) and surgical (H48 and H168) groups. A left pneumonectomy under volume-controlled one-lung ventilation (OLV) (low tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure = 4 cm H2O, inspired oxygen fraction = 50%) was performed in surgical animals. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure were recorded. Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) was calculated. Pulmonary damage score (PDS) and bronchoalveolar albumin level were evaluated. Data were collected after induction (T0), after OLV (T1), after left pneumonectomy (T2), and at H48 or H168 (T3).

Results: Pneumonectomy caused precapillary pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) measured at T3 H48 (36.2 ± 3.67 mm Hg). PAH was delayed temporarily (both after OLV and after pneumonectomy) (p < 0.001), and linked with PVR (r = 0.93; p < 0.05). PDS and bronchoalveolar albumin level varied with MPAP (r = 0.76; p < 0.001 and r = 0.55; p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Given that PAH is delayed and related to PVR increase, indicating secondary pulmonary vascular bed adaptation limits, pharmacological treatment should focus on a delayed failure in pulmonary capacitance in patients at risk of PPE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000357058DOI Listing
November 2014

Video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy: an unavoidable trend? A retrospective single-institution series of 410 cases.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2013 Jul 16;17(1):36-43. Epub 2013 Apr 16.

Department of Thoracic, Cardiac and Vascular Surgery, Arnaud de Villeneuve Hospital, Montpellier, France.

Objectives: Evaluation of the feasibility, safety and oncological validity of video-assisted thoracic lobectomy (VATS). The VATS study exclusion criteria included T3 or T4 tumours, central hilar tumours, tumours visible on bronchoscopy requiring sleeve resection, hilar lymphadenopathy, N2 disease, history of neoadjuvant chemotherapy or radiation, previous thoracic surgery or pleurodesis.

Methods: A retrospective study of 410 patients (143 women, mean age 61.5 ± 13.1 years (84-15) treated by VATS lobectomy between 1996 and 2011 was performed at our institution. VATS lobectomy was performed for lung cancer (n = 364, 88.9%), pulmonary metastasis (n = 25, 5.8%) and non-neoplastic diseases (n = 21, 5.1%). In lung cancer, a systematic radical lymph node dissection was performed.

Results: There was no intraoperative death. The conversion rate was 6.1% (n = 25): bleeding (n = 4), extended pleural adhesion (n = 6, 1.4%), technical difficulty (n = 6, 1.4%), tumour extension to the fissure or mediastinum or adenopathy (n = 7, 1.7%) and intolerance to one-lung ventilation (n = 2, 0.4%). The postoperative mortality rate was 1.2% (n = 5). Major complications occurred in 21 patients (5.1%). The mean number of mediastinal nodes removed was 14.6 (5-44) and 42 patients (10.2%) presented N2 disease at the definitive staging. The mean operating time was 152 (85-315) min. The mean drainage duration was 3.2 days (1-15). Mean postoperative length of hospital stay before return at home was 6.8 days (3-75) and 5.5 days in patients without major complications. There was no port site recurrence. Kaplan-Meier 3-year survival rates were 76.5% for Stage I and 87.3% for Stage IA, 58% for Stage II and 61% for Stage III.

Conclusions: VATS lobectomy is an acceptable alternative and seems equivalent to open lobectomy in terms of complications and oncological value. Our experience prompts us to consider VATS lobectomy for early stage NSCLC as the first surgical approach in view of the improvement in outcome, provided that the procedure is performed by a surgeon with adequate experience with this approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivt146DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3686401PMC
July 2013

Chest-wall reconstruction in case of infection of the operative site: is there any interest in titanium rib osteosynthesis?

Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2013 Nov 27;44(5):866-74. Epub 2013 Feb 27.

Division of Thoracic Surgery and Division of Cardiothoracic Radiology, University Hospital Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier, France.

Objectives: To describe the management of thoracic reconstructions in the presence of primary chest-wall infection (PCWI) or secondary deep chest-wall infection (SCWI), focussing on local tolerance of a titanium rib osteosynthesis system.

Methods: PCWI included infected chest wall tumours (CWT), infected T3 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and open flail chest. SCWI was defined by deep infection of previous thoracic-wall reconstructions. Infection was identified by preoperative bacterial analysis of the tumour or surgical site. In PCWI, a one-step procedure combined extensive resection of infected tissues and rigid reconstruction of the defect; skeletal rigidity was achieved using titanium implants. In SCWI, we removed all synthetic material except titanium implants. In both groups, the surgical field was thoroughly cleaned and implants were wrapped or covered by flaps.

Results: From January 2005 to December 2011, 11 patients (54 ± 10.2 years) with either PCWI (3 CWT, 3 T3 NSCLC, 1 open flail chest) or SCWI (3 CWT, 1 funnel chest) were treated. Infection was polymicrobial in all but 1 case. Bacteria observed in PCWI patients were multidrug resistant. In PCWI, we resected 4.2 ± 0.6 ribs en bloc with the lung (n = 5), the skin and the pectoralis major and then used mesh and 2.1 ± 1.2 titanium implants for reconstruction (n = 6). The mean defect was 1154.4 ± 318 cm(3). Surgical SCWI management removed polytetrafluoroethylene-mesh and preserved the titanium implants. A Vicryl mesh (n = 3) and greater omentum flap (n = 3) were added. One of the 2 postoperative deaths in the PCWI group was related to infection recurrence. No other patient had infection at the 6-month follow-up with leucocyte-labelled scintigraphy.

Conclusion: Titanium rib osteosynthesis is reliable in two complex and life-threatening situations: PCWIs and SCWIs. In combination with a flap, this allows rapid, reliable, rigid reconstruction of infected full-thickness chest-wall defects in a single-step procedure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ejcts/ezt084DOI Listing
November 2013
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