Publications by authors named "Laurence Pincet"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Intubation Related Laryngeal Injuries in Pediatric Population.

Front Pediatr 2021 10;9:594832. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Head and Neck Surgery Department, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Laryngeal intubation related lesions (LIRL) in pediatric patients cause extreme morbidity in both elective and emergency settings. It has a wide range of presentations from minor laryngeal edema to a life-threatening airway obstruction. We report here our units' experience with LIRL in neonates, infants, and small children. This is a retrospective monocentric cohort study between January 2013 and April 2019. Thirty-nine patients with intubation lesions were included in the study. We looked at the lesions type, characteristics, management, and outcome. Half the patients were premature and having comorbidities. Main LIRL were subglottic stenosis (31%), ulcers (26%), granulations (18%), retention cysts (18%), posterior glottic stenosis (13%), and vocal cords edema (5%). Unfavorable lesions causing airway stenosis were associated with an intubation duration of over 1 week and were an important factor in causing airway stenosis ( < 0.05). The endoscopic treatment performed for these lesions was lesion and anatomical site-specific. Tracheostomy was needed in five patients, and was avoided in another two. Seven patients (18%) received open surgery prior to their decannulation. LIRL management is challenging and stressful in the pediatric population and optimal treatment could avoid extreme morbidity in them. Intubation duration and associated comorbidities are important factors in deciding the severity of these lesions. Protocols to prevent the formation of these lesions are critical.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2021.594832DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7902727PMC
February 2021

Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: A Retrospective Review and Current Opinion.

Front Surg 2020 20;7:616174. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

ENT Department, CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Head and Neck Mucosal Melanoma (HNMM) is an uncommon malignancy that arises in decreasing order in the nasal cavity, the paranasal sinuses, and the oral cavity. Although radical surgery followed by eventual radiotherapy is acknowledged as the mainstay treatment, patients with advanced stages or multi-focal tumors benefit from new systemic therapies. We wish to share our experience with these treatments and review the current literature. We present a case review of every patient treated in our center for an HNMM over the past 10 years, including every patient treated in our center for an HNMM over the past 10 years. We analyzed clinical characteristics, treatment modalities, and outcomes. We included eight patients aged from 62 to 85 years old. We found six MM in the nasal cavity, one in the sphenoidal sinus, and one in the piriform sinus. Six patients underwent endoscopic surgery with negative margins, six underwent radiotherapy with variable modalities. Immunotherapy or targeted therapy was given in cases extensive tumors without the possibility of a surgical treatment or in two patient as an adjuvant treatment after R0 surgery. The three-year overall survival was 50%, and three patients (37.5%) are in remission. HNMM is associated with poor oncologic outcomes regarding the concerned patients of our review, as reported in the literature. New treatments such as immunotherapies or targeted therapies have not significantly changed the prognosis, but they may offer new interesting perspectives. Our small series of cases seems to confirm that surgical resection with negative margins improves overall survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2020.616174DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7873938PMC
January 2021

Role of Unilateral Vocal Cord Palsy in Causing Recurrent Tracheobronchial Foreign Bodies.

Front Pediatr 2019 24;7:282. Epub 2019 Jul 24.

ENT Head and Neck Surgery Department, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Foreign body (FB) aspiration in children is a frequent condition managed by ENT pediatric surgeons and pediatric pulmonologists. We present the case of a 20-months-old child who presented with three recurrent episodes of FB aspiration. At the time of FB removal, an initial dynamic examination of the larynx revealed a unilateral vocal cord palsy (UVCP). For recurrent tracheobronchial FB inhalation, we recommend a systematic dynamic airway endoscopy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2019.00282DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6668050PMC
July 2019

Graves Disease Causing Pancytopenia: Case Report and Literature Review.

Clin Med Insights Case Rep 2018 25;11:1179547618781090. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

ENT Surgery Department, University Hospital Centre (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: Graves disease or other causes of thyrotoxicosis are frequently associated with cytopenia. Although anemia is the most common, other cell lineage can be affected. Pancytopenia is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis.

Case Presentation: We report a case of a 33-year-old Chinese man who presented a nonsevere pancytopenia in the context of a newly diagnosed Graves disease. Restauration of euthyroid state led to progressive correction of pancytopenia.

Conclusions: Literature review shows other rare cases of pancytopenia. It is usually nonsevere with just extremely rare cases of transfusion reported. Evolution was always favorable after achievement of euthyroid state. Its mechanism remains poorly understood, especially because those patients have no vitamin or iron deficiency. The exact physiopathological process remains unclear but 2 causes seem to overlap: reduced production of hematopoietic cells from the bone marrow and increased destruction or sequestration of mature hematopoietic cells. Despite unclear mechanism, the presence of hematologic abnormalities including pancytopenia must not be considered as a contraindication to antithyroid drug therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1179547618781090DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6069025PMC
June 2018

Acute pulmonary edema induced by non-ionic low-osmolar radiographic contrast media.

Open Access Emerg Med 2018 14;10:75-79. Epub 2018 Jun 14.

Department of Internal Medicine, Riviera - Chablais Hospital, Monthey Site, Route de Morgins, Monthey, Switzerland.

Background: Non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema (NCPE) after intravenous (iv) administration of non-ionic radiocontrast media (RCM) is a rare but life-threatening complication. In a context of emergency, its diagnosis is difficult.

Case Report: We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who developed an acute pulmonary edema following iv infusion of non-ionic, low-osmolar RCM during abdominal CT scan. She needed a 24-hour hospitalization in intensive care unit for an acute hypoxemic dyspnea. She was falsely treated at first for an anaphylactic reaction, and then for a cardiac failure. She improved with cortisone and diuretic treatment.

Conclusion: Although NCPE has been rarely reported after RCM injection, it remains an acute severe complication that has to be considered. The differential diagnosis involves multiple pathogenic patterns giving furthermore complexity in choosing an appropriate treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S154081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6005305PMC
June 2018

Differential protein modulation in midguts of Aedes aegypti infected with chikungunya and dengue 2 viruses.

PLoS One 2010 Oct 5;5(10). Epub 2010 Oct 5.

Unité de Génétique Moléculaire des Bunyavirus, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

Background: Arthropod borne virus infections cause several emerging and resurgent infectious diseases. Among the diseases caused by arboviruses, dengue and chikungunya are responsible for a high rate of severe human diseases worldwide. The midgut of mosquitoes is the first barrier for pathogen transmission and is a target organ where arboviruses must replicate prior to infecting other organs. A proteomic approach was undertaken to characterize the key virus/vector interactions and host protein modifications that happen in the midgut for viral transmission to eventually take place.

Methodology And Principal Findings: Using a proteomics differential approach with two-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we defined the protein modulations in the midgut of Aedes aegypti that were triggered seven days after an oral infection (7 DPI) with dengue 2 (DENV-2) and chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses. Gel profile comparisons showed that the level of 18 proteins was modulated by DENV-2 only and 12 proteins were modulated by CHIKV only. Twenty proteins were regulated by both viruses in either similar or different ways. Both viruses caused an increase of proteins involved in the generation of reactive oxygen species, energy production, and carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Midgut infection by DENV-2 and CHIKV triggered an antioxidant response. CHIKV infection produced an increase of proteins involved in detoxification.

Conclusion/significance: Our study constitutes the first analysis of the protein response of Aedes aegypti's midgut infected with viruses belonging to different families. It shows that the differentially regulated proteins in response to viral infection include structural, redox, regulatory proteins, and enzymes for several metabolic pathways. Some of these proteins like antioxidant are probably involved in cell protection. On the other hand, we propose that the modulation of other proteins like transferrin, hsp60 and alpha glucosidase, may favour virus survival, replication and transmission, suggesting a subversion of the insect cell metabolism by the arboviruses.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0013149PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2950154PMC
October 2010