Publications by authors named "Laurence Bisch"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Efficiency of the RADPAD Surgical Cap in Reducing Brain Exposure During Pacemaker and Defibrillator Implantation.

JACC Clin Electrophysiol 2021 02 30;7(2):161-170. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Centre Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Objectives: This study sought to investigate the RADPAD No Brainer (Worldwide Innovation and Technologies, Overland Park, Kansas) efficiency in reducing brain exposure to scattered radiation.

Background: Cranial radioprotective caps such as the RADPAD No Brainer are being marketed as devices that significantly reduce operator's brain exposure to scattered radiation. However, the efficiency of the RADPAD No Brainer in reducing brain exposure in clinical practice remains unknown to date.

Methods: Five electrophysiologists performing device implantations over a 2-month period wore the RADPAD cap with 2 strips of 11 thermoluminescent dosimeter pellets covering the front head above and under the shielded cap. Phantom measurements and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to further investigate brain dose distribution.

Results: Our study showed that the right half of the operators' front head was the most exposed region during left subpectoral device implantation; the RADPAD cap attenuated the skin front-head exposure but provided no protection to the brain. The exposure of the anterior part of the brain was decreased by a factor of 4.5 compared with the front-head skin value thanks to the skull. The RADPAD cap worn as a protruding horizontal plane, however, reduced brain exposure by a factor of 1.7 (interquartile range: 1.3 to 1.9).

Conclusions: During device implantation, the RADPAD No Brainer decreased the skin front head exposure but had no impact on brain dose distribution. The RADPAD No Brainer worn as a horizontal plane worn around the neck reduces brain exposure and confirms that the exposure comes from upward scattered radiation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacep.2020.08.007DOI Listing
February 2021

Impact of contact force sensing technology on outcome of catheter ablation of idiopathic pre-mature ventricular contractions originating from the outflow tracts.

Europace 2021 Apr;23(4):603-609

Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Basel, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.

Aims: Catheter ablation of frequent idiopathic pre-mature ventricular contractions (PVC) is increasingly performed. While potential benefits of contact force (CF)-sensing technology for atrial fibrillation ablation have been assessed in several studies, the impact of CF-sensing on ventricular arrhythmia ablation remains unknown. This study aimed to compare outcomes of idiopathic outflow tract PVC ablation when using standard ablation catheters as opposed to CF-sensing catheters.

Methods And Results: In a retrospective multi-centre study, unselected patients undergoing catheter ablation of idiopathic outflow tract PVCs between 2013 and 2016 were enrolled. All procedures were performed using irrigated-tip ablation catheters and a 3D electro-anatomical mapping system. Sustained ablation success was defined as a  ≥80% reduction of pre-procedural PVC burden determined by 24 h Holter ECG during follow-up. Overall, 218 patients were enrolled (median age 52 years, 51% males). Baseline and procedural data were similar in the standard ablation (24%) and the CF-sensing group (76%). Overall, the median PVC burden decreased from 21% (IQR 10-30%) before ablation to 0.2% (IQR 0-3.0%) after a median follow-up of 2.3 months (IQR 1.4-3.9 months). The rates of both acute (91% vs. 91%, P = 0.94) and sustained success (79% vs. 74%, P = 0.44) were similar in the standard ablation and the CF-sensing groups. No differences were observed in subgroups according to arrhythmia origin from the RVOT (65%) or LVOT (35%). Complications were rare (1.8%) and evenly distributed between the two groups.

Conclusion: The use of CF-sensing technology is not associated with increased success rate nor decreased complication rate in idiopathic outflow tract PVC ablation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/euaa315DOI Listing
April 2021

[The year in cardiology : 2018].

Rev Med Suisse 2019 Jan;15(N° 632-633):27-30

Service de cardiologie, CHUV, 1011 Lausanne.

This review article provides a broad overview of the novelties in cardiology in 2018. Advances in interventional cardiology and cardiovascular prevention, heart failure, electrophysiology and non-invasive cardiovascular imaging have provided important new insights in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of ischemic and valvular heart disease, heart failure, rhythm disorders and cardiomyopathies. This article provides an overview of the most relevant articles published in 2018.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2019

Leadless pacing using the transcatheter pacing system (Micra TPS) in the real world: initial Swiss experience from the Romandie region.

Europace 2019 Feb;21(2):275-280

Department of Cardiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle Perret Gentil 4, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland.

Aims: Leadless pacemakers are implanted in Switzerland since June 2015. Large worldwide registries have shown high implant success, low complication rates, and good electrical parameters up to 12 months' follow-up. However, data are scarce outside the investigational setting. The purpose of this study is to assess the real-world experience regarding clinical safety and efficacy of Micra TPS (transcatheter pacing system) leadless pacemakers.

Methods And Results: Retrospective observational, multi-centre study designed to assess initial safety and efficacy of the Micra TPS in the Swiss Romande region. A total of 92 patients were included from four different centres with an implantation success rate of 97.8% (90 of 92). Thresholds were overall low at implantation (median 0.38 V/0.24 ms, ranging from 0.13 to 2.88 V/0.24 ms) and remained stable over 1-year follow-up. The perioperative serious adverse event rate was 6.5% in six patients which lead to prolonged hospitalization in five patients and death in one patient. In addition, three further major events (3.3%) occurred during an average follow-up of 1 year, requiring implantation of a standard transvenous pacemaker in two patients, and surgical explantation of the Micra TPS in one patient due to intractable ventricular tachycardia.

Conclusion: Leadless pacemakers are a valuable adjunct for treating selected patients requiring single-chamber pacing. However, in this initial experience, major complication rates were high (9.8%). The implant procedure requires proper training and should be performed in an adequate setting.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/euy195DOI Listing
February 2019

A High Baseline Electrographic Organization Level Is Predictive of Successful Termination of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation by Catheter Ablation.

JACC Clin Electrophysiol 2016 Nov 21;2(6):746-755. Epub 2016 Nov 21.

Service of Cardiology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Objectives: This study sought to investigate whether the level of organization of electrocardiographic (ECG) signals based on novel indexes is predictive of persistent atrial fibrillation (pAF) termination by catheter ablation (CA).

Background: Whether the level of ECG organization in pAF is correlated with the restoration of sinus rhythm by CA remains unknown.

Methods: Thirty consecutive patients who underwent stepwise CA for pAF (sustained duration 19 ± 11 months) were included in the study (derivation cohort). ECG lead V was placed on the patients' back (V) to improve left atrial (LA) recording. Two novel ECG indexes were computed using an adaptive harmonic frequency tracking scheme: 1) the adaptive organization index (AOI), which quantifies the cyclicity of AF harmonic oscillations; and 2) the adaptive phase index (API), which quantifies the phase coupling between the harmonic components. Index cutoff values predictive of procedural AF termination were then tested on a validation cohort of 8 consecutive patients.

Results: In the derivation cohort, CA terminated AF in 21 patients within the LA (70%; left-terminated [LT] group), whereas CA did not terminate AF in 9 patients (30%; non-left-terminated [NLT] group). LT patients displayed a higher ECG organization level at baseline than the NLT patients, with the best separation achieved by AOI and API computed on lead V (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.94 and AUC = 0.88, respectively; p < 0.05) and API on lead V (AUC = 0.83; p < 0.05). Similar results were obtained for both AOI and API in the validation cohort.

Conclusions: Patients in whom pAF terminated within the LA exhibited a higher level of atrial ECG organization, which was suggestive of a limited number of LA drivers than that of patients in whom the pAF could not be terminated by CA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacep.2016.05.017DOI Listing
November 2016

[Cardiac sarcoidosis: seven keypoints to remind in order to avoid misdiagnosis].

Rev Med Suisse 2016 May;12(520):1035-6, 1038-41

Early diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis remains difficult in the absence of specific symptoms. The evolution and prognosis of the disease are strongly correlated to an early and appropriate treatment. The multi-modality assessment based on cardiac MRI and positron emission tomography associated with computed tomography (PET/CT) has significantly improved the detection of cardiac sarcoidosis over the last two decades. These approaches appear as useful and suitable imaging strategy for the early diagnosis, the assessment of the disease extent as well as the management and therapeutic follow-up. This article is a didactic review on cardiac sarcoidosis, with a special focus on recent diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, prognosis and interest of imaging techniques.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
May 2016

Nonlinear analysis of right atrial electrograms predicts termination of persistent atrial fibrillation within the left atrium by catheter ablation.

Physiol Meas 2016 Mar 10;37(3):347-59. Epub 2016 Feb 10.

Applied Signal Processing Group, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland.

The termination of long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (LS-pAF) can be achieved by stepwise catheter ablation (step-CA) within the left atrium (LA). Our study aims to applying complexity measures derived from nonlinear time series analysis in order to characterize LS-pAF in terms of organization and to identify patients in whom AF can be terminated from those in whom AF cannot be terminated by step-CA within the LA. A total of 33 consecutive patients (age 61  ±  7 years, sustained AF duration 19  ±  11 months) with LS-pAF underwent step-CA. The organization of right bipolar electrograms before and during the ablation procedure was assessed using the coarse-grained correlation dimension. LS-pAF was terminated into sinus rhythm or atrial tachycardia in 22 patients during step-CA within the LA (left terminated patients-LT). In 11 patients the ablation procedure failed to terminate AF within LA (not left terminated patients-NLT). The statistical analysis of the estimated coarse-grained correlation dimension revealed that a higher right atrial (RA) organization before step-CA was associated to AF termination within the LA. During the ablation procedure, the level of RA organization displayed distinctive evolution between LT and NLT patients with a significant organization increase before AF termination for the LT patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0967-3334/37/3/347DOI Listing
March 2016

Short-Term Heparin Kinetics during Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2015 Oct 20;38(10):1142-50. Epub 2015 Jun 20.

Service of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: Percutaneous catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (CA-AF) is a treatment option for symptomatic drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). CA-AF carries a risk for thromboembolic complications that has been minimized by the use of intraprocedural intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH). The optimal administration of UFH as well as its kinetics are not well established and need to be precisely determined.

Methods And Results: A total 102 of consecutive patients suffering from symptomatic drug-refractory AF underwent CA-AF. The mean age was 61 ± 10 years old. After transseptal puncture of the fossa ovalis, weight-adjusted UFH bolus (100 U/kg) was infused. A significant increase in activated clotting time (ACT) was observed from an average value of 100 ± 27 seconds at baseline, to 355 ± 94 seconds at 10 min (T10), to 375 ± 90 seconds at 20 min (T20). Twenty-four patients failed to reach the targeted ACT value of ≥300 seconds at T10 and more than half of these remained with subtherapeutic ACT values at T20. This subset of patients showed similar clinical characteristics and amount of UFH but were more frequently prescribed preprocedural vitamin K1 than the rest of the study population.

Conclusions: In a typical intervention setting, UFH displays unexpected slow anticoagulation kinetics in a significant proportion of procedures up to 20 minutes after infusion. These findings support the infusion of UFH before transseptal puncture or any left-sided catheterization with early ACT measurements to identify patients with delayed kinetics. They are in line with recent guidelines to perform CA-AF under therapeutic anticoagulation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pace.12667DOI Listing
October 2015

Remote-controlled magnetic pulmonary vein isolation combined with superior vena cava isolation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a prospective randomized study.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2015 Mar 7;108(3):163-71. Epub 2015 Feb 7.

Division of Cardiology, Jean-Monnet University, Saint-Étienne, France.

Background: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) has focused on pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). However, despite initial positive results, significant recurrences have occurred, partly because of pulmonary vein (PV) reconnection or non-PV ectopic foci, including the superior vena cava (SVC).

Objectives: This prospective, randomized study sought to investigate the efficacy of additional SVCI combined with PVI in symptomatic PAF patients referred for ablation.

Methods: From November 2011 to May 2013, RFA was performed remotely using a CARTO(®) 3 System in patients randomized to undergo PVI for symptomatic drug-refractory PAF, with (PVI+SVCI group) or without (PVI alone group) SVCI. PVI and SVCI were confirmed by spiral catheter recording during ablation. Procedural data, complications and freedom from atrial tachycardia (AT) and atrial fibrillation (AF) were assessed.

Results: Over an 18-month period, 100 consecutive patients (56±9years; 17 women) with symptomatic PAF were included in the study (PVI+SVCI, n=51; PVI, n=49); the CHA2DS2-VASc score was 0.9±1. Median duration of procedure (±interquartile), 2.5±1hours; total X-ray exposure, 13.3±8minutes; transseptal puncture and catheter positioning, 8±5minutes; left atrium electroanatomical reconstruction, 3±2minutes; and catheter ablation, 3.7±3minutes. After a median follow-up of 15±8months, and having undergone a single procedure, 84% of patients were symptom free, while 86% remained asymptomatic after undergoing two procedures. The cumulative risks of atrial arrhythmias (AT or AF) were interpreted using Kaplan-Meier curves and compared using the log-rank test. Long-term follow-up revealed no significant difference between groups, with atrial arrhythmias occurring in six (12%) patients in the PVI+SVCI group and nine (18%) patients in the PVI alone group (P=0.6). One transient phrenic nerve palsy and one phrenic nerve injury with partial recovery occurred in the PVI+SVCI group.

Conclusions: SVCI combined with PVI did not reduce the risk of subsequent AF recurrence, and was responsible for two phrenic nerve injuries. Accordingly, the benefit-to-risk ratio argues against systematic SVCI.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2014.10.005DOI Listing
March 2015

Does a patent foramen ovale matter when using a remote-controlled magnetic system for pulmonary vein isolation?

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2014 Feb 18;107(2):88-95. Epub 2014 Feb 18.

Division of Cardiology, Jean-Monnet University, Saint-Étienne, France.

Background: Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) takes longer when using a patent foramen ovale (PFO) compared with a transseptal puncture in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) with manual catheter ablation. To our knowledge, no data exist concerning the impact of a PFO on AF ablation procedure variables when using a remote magnetic navigation (RMN) system.

Aim: To assess the impact of a PFO when using an RMN system in patients requiring AF ablation.

Methods: Between December 2011 and December 2012, catheter ablation was performed remotely using the CARTO(®) 3 system in 167 consecutive patients who underwent PVI for symptomatic drug-refractory AF. The radiofrequency generator was set to a fixed power ≤ 35 W. The primary endpoint was wide-area circumferential PVI confirmed by spiral catheter recording during ablation for all patients and including additional lesion lines (left atrial roof) or complex fractionated atrial electrograms for persistent AF. Secondary endpoints included procedural data.

Results: Mean age 58±10 years; 18% women; 107 (64%) patients with symptomatic paroxysmal AF; 60 (36%) with persistent AF; CHA2DS2-VASc score 1.2 ± 1. The PFO presence was evidenced in 49/167 (29.3%) patients during the procedure but in only 26/167 (16%) by transoesophageal echocardiography. Median procedure time 2.5 ± 1 hours; median total X-ray exposure time 14 ± 7 minutes; transseptal puncture and catheter positioning time 7.5 ± 5 minutes; left atrium electroanatomical reconstruction time 3 ± 2.3 minutes; catheter ablation time 3 ± 3 minutes. No procedure time or X-ray exposure differences were observed between patients with or without a PFO during magnetic navigation catheter ablation. X-ray exposure time was significantly reduced using a PFO compared with double transseptal puncture access.

Conclusions: A PFO does not affect magnetic navigation during AF ablation; procedure times and X-ray exposure were similar. Septal catheter probing is mandatory to limit X-ray exposure and prevent potential complications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2014.01.003DOI Listing
February 2014

Remote-controlled magnetic pulmonary vein isolation using a new three-dimensional non-fluoroscopic navigation system: a single-centre prospective study.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2013 Aug-Sep;106(8-9):423-32. Epub 2013 Jul 29.

Service de Cardiologie, Hôpital Nord, CHU de Saint-Étienne, Université Jean-Monnet, 42055 Saint-Étienne Cedex 2, France. Electronic address:

Background: Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) focuses on pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), but the procedure is associated with significant X-ray exposure. Few data exist concerning the combination of remote magnetic navigation (RMN) and a new three-dimensional non-fluoroscopic navigation system (Carto(®) 3), which facilitates precise catheter navigation and limits X-ray exposure.

Aims: To assess the efficacy and extent of fluoroscopic exposure associated with the combination of RMN and the Carto 3 system in patients requiring AF ablation.

Methods: Between January and September 2011, catheter ablation was performed remotely using the Carto 3 system in 81 consecutive patients who underwent PVI for symptomatic drug-refractory AF. The radiofrequency generator was set to a fixed power ≤ 35W. The primary endpoint was wide-area circumferential PVI confirmed by spiral catheter recording during ablation and including additional lesion lines (left atrial roof and coronary sinus defragmentation) or complex fractionated atrial electrograms for persistent AF. Secondary endpoints included procedural data, complications and freedom from atrial tachycardia (AT)/AF.

Results: Mean age was 60 ± 9 years; 20% were women; 73% had symptomatic paroxysmal AF; 27% had persistent AF. The CHA2DS2-VASc score was 1.2 ± 1. Median procedure time was 3.5 ± 1 hours; median total X-ray exposure time was 13 ± 7 minutes; transseptal puncture and catheter positioning took 8 ± 4 minutes, left atrium electroanatomical reconstruction 1 ± 4 minutes and catheter ablation 3.5 ± 5minutes. Recurrences were AT (n=3; 3.7%), paroxysmal AF (n=8; 9.9%) and persistent AF (n=4; 4.9%); redo ablation was performed in these 15 (19%) patients. After a median follow-up of 15 ± 6 months and a single procedure, 71% of patients were free of symptoms; 84% remained asymptomatic after two procedures.

Conclusions: RMN with irrigated catheters combined with the Carto 3 system can be effectively performed in patients requiring AF ablation with minimal use of fluoroscopy, but larger randomized studies are warranted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2013.04.008DOI Listing
June 2014

Focus on right ventricular outflow tract septal pacing.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2013 Jun-Jul;106(6-7):394-403. Epub 2013 Jul 10.

Service de Cardiologie, Université Jean Monnet, Hôpital Nord, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint-Etienne, France.

Experimental and clinical studies have shown that right ventricular apical pacing may result in long-term deleterious effects on account of its negative impact on left ventricular remodeling through desynchronization. This risk appears more pronounced in patients with even moderate left ventricular dysfunction and generally occurs after at least 1 year of pacing. As right ventricular apical pacing may be associated with the development of organic mitral insufficiency, other sites that allow for more physiological stimulation, such as right ventricular outflow tract septal pacing, have been developed, with good feasibility and reproducibility. However, the prospective randomized studies and meta-analyses to date have only demonstrated a modest effect on ejection fraction in the medium term, without any significant effect on quality of life and morbimortality. However, the absence of a favorable effect for right ventricular outflow tract septal pacing compared with right ventricular apical pacing in terms of clinical manifestations and patient prognosis appears to be more associated with the designs of these studies, which were not homogeneous with regard to methodology used, judgment criteria, follow-up and, especially, statistical power. Two randomized prospective multicentre studies are currently ongoing in order to evaluate the favorable effect of infundibular septal pacing, when considering the indirect negative effects of right ventricular apical pacing as reported in the literature.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2012.08.005DOI Listing
October 2013

Remote magnetic navigation and arrhythmia ablation.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2012 Aug-Sep;105(8-9):446-53. Epub 2012 Jul 15.

Service de cardiologie, hôpital Nord, université Jean-Monnet, CHU de Saint-Étienne, 42055 Saint-Étienne cedex 2, France.

Radiofrequency treatment is the first-choice treatment for arrhythmias, in particular complex arrhythmias and especially atrial fibrillation, due to the greater benefit/risk ratio compared with antiarrhythmic drugs. However, complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation require long procedures with additional risks such as X-ray exposure or serious complications including tamponade. Given this context, robotic magnetic navigation is a technique well suited to the treatment of complex arrhythmias, on account of its efficacy and reliability, the significant reduction in X-ray exposure for both patient and operator, and the very low risk of perforation. As ongoing developments will likely improve results and procedure times, this technology will become one of the most advanced for treating arrhythmias.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2012.02.009DOI Listing
February 2013

A single-centre experience concerning the safety of Sprint Fidelis defibrillator lead extraction at the time of pulse generator replacement or in case of evidence of lead failure.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2012 Apr 3;105(4):203-10. Epub 2012 Apr 3.

Division of Cardiology, Jean-Monnet University, 42000 Saint-Étienne, France.

Background: The reported failure rate of the Sprint Fidelis defibrillator lead (SFDL) has increased more than initially expected, with emerging evidence of accelerating fracture rates. Current consensus guidelines continue to discourage prophylactic lead extraction, citing major complication rates of 1.4-7.3%. Therefore, data relating to the risks of systematic SFDL extraction are lacking, with no methodical extraction protocol reported to date. Moreover, few statistical analyses have identified predictors of SFDL failure.

Objectives: The aims of this single-centre study were: to examine the safety and feasibility of systematic SFDL extraction at the time of pulse generator replacement or in case of lead failure; and to identify predictors of SFDL failure.

Methods: Between January 2005 and October 2007, 218 consecutive patients underwent transvenous SFDL implantation in our centre.

Results: During a mean follow-up of 43 ± 15 months, SFDL extraction was performed in 49 patients (22.5%) for the following reasons: inappropriate shocks (n = 21; 9.6%), systematic extraction at time of pulse generator extraction (n = 23; 10.5%), high impedance (n = 3; 1.4%), high SFDL threshold (n = 1; 0.4%) and cardiac device-related infection (n = 1; 0.4%). No severe complications occurred, although two minor complications were reported (lead dislodgments). SFDL fracture was observed in 25 patients (11.5%; 3.2%/year incidence). The only predictor associated with SFDL fracture was the number of leads (P = 0.01).

Conclusion: In our series, SFDL extraction at the time of pulse generator extraction or in case of evidence of lead failure was feasible and safe. Number of leads was identified as a new predictive factor for SFDL fracture.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2012.01.007DOI Listing
April 2012

Single-centre experience with an 8-mm tip catheter for radiofrequency catheter ablation of outflow tract ventricular ectopic beats.

Arch Cardiovasc Dis 2012 Jan 9;105(1):24-32. Epub 2012 Feb 9.

Department of Cardiology, Jean-Monnet University, Faculty of Medicine J.-Lisfranc, Service de cardiologie, hôpital Nord, CHU de Saint-Etienne, 42055 Saint-Étienne cedex 2, France.

Background: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of outflow tract ventricular ectopic beats (OTVEBs) can be performed using a 4-mm or externally-cooled tip RFA catheter, but no data are available concerning the safety and efficacy of a large-tip (8-mm) catheter.

Aims: To evaluate the feasibility of using an 8-mm tip catheter in patients with OTVEBs.

Methods: In this prospective cohort study, the 8-mm tip catheter was tested in patients who were referred to our centre for RFA of symptomatic OTVEBs.

Results: The mean age of the 16 patients recruited between September 2008 and March 2010 was 53±18 years and 56.3% were male. Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 62±9%, mean ventricular ectopic beat width was 144±21 ms, and all patients had left bundle branch block. Fourteen patients had inferior axis QRS morphology and two had superior. The main symptoms were palpitations and pre-syncope. RFA parameters were: procedure time 94±35 min; duration of application 11±10 min; impedance 81±12 Ω; temperature 50±5 °C; and power 46±17 W. RFA succeeded in 15 over 16 patients (93.8%); and recurrence was seen in one patient after a mean follow-up time of 11±6 months. No complications were noted.

Conclusions: This preliminary study suggests that an 8-mm tip catheter may represent an alternative for RFA in patients with OTVEBs in whom a 4-mm tip was not successful. Larger randomized studies are therefore warranted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acvd.2011.11.006DOI Listing
January 2012

Anatomical factors involved in difficult cardiac resynchronization therapy procedure: a non-invasive study using dual-source 64-multi-slice computed tomography.

Europace 2012 Jun 23;14(6):833-40. Epub 2011 Nov 23.

Division of Cardiology, Jean Monnet University, Saint-Etienne, France.

Aims: In cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) procedure, left ventricular (LV) lead implantation is time consuming. In this clinical setting, no study has investigated the impact of right atrium anatomical parameters on both CRT implantation procedure duration and X-ray exposure. Additionally, only few studies have examined the coronary sinus (CS) using dual-source 64-multi-slice computed tomography (DS 64-MSCT), and its impact on CRT procedure parameters has not yet been investigated. The aim of this prospective study was to identify local anatomical predictive factors of difficult CRT implantation procedure using DS 64-MSCT.

Methods And Results: Between January and July 2010, 50 consecutive patients underwent primo CRT implantation. The patient population had a mean age of 70 ± 10 years, and was 34% female, with New York Heart Association Class 3.2 ± 0.3 heart failure, left ventricle ejection fraction 30 ± 4%, and QRS width 157 ± 30 ms. Cardiac resynchronization therapy implantation was attempted in 50 patients, and first LV lead implantation was obtained in 49 of 50 patients (98% primary success). One implantation failed (2%) due to unsuccessful LV lead implant. Procedure parameters were as follows: LV threshold, 1.4 ± 0.8 V; LV wave amplitude, 17 ± 8 mV; LV impedance, 830 ± 240 Ω; median procedure time (skin to skin), 51 min (38 min); median fluoroscopy procedure time, 11.9 min (22 min); and median LV fluoroscopic time, 10.3 min (22 min). In 10 patients (20%), procedures were difficult requiring an implantation lasting ≥ 85 min. The only predictive factor for difficult CRT implantation was the insertion level of the CS ostium (CSO), evaluated by the distance between the CSO and the bottom floor of the right atrium (14.8 ± 4 vs. 9.5 ± 4; P= 0.01). Neither the right atrium dilation nor right ventricular dysfunction was associated with difficult CRT implantation procedures.

Conclusions: Today, despite improvements in the materials used, problems still remain in the CRT procedure. In this clinical setting, the only predictive factor for very long CRT procedures is the CSO-level insertion (located high). This anatomical anomaly identified by DS 64-MSCT prior to surgery is responsible for 20% of difficult CRT device implantation procedures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/eur350DOI Listing
June 2012

Predictive factors of difficult implantation procedure in cardiac resynchronization therapy.

Europace 2010 Aug 23;12(8):1141-8. Epub 2010 Jun 23.

1Division of Cardiology, University Jean Monnet, Saint-Etienne, France.

Aims: The usefulness of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with congestive heart failure is offset by its long, user-dependent, and technical procedure. No studies have been published regarding factors related to CRT implantation procedure duration and X-ray exposure. Additionally, only a few studies have investigated the predictive factors of primary left ventricular (LV) lead implant failure. The aim of this prospective study was two-fold: (i) to evaluate the prevalence and predictive factors of prolonged CRT implantation procedure and (ii) to identify the predictive factors of primary LV lead implantation failure.

Methods And Results: Between November 2008 and September 2009, 128 consecutive patients underwent CRT implantation; of these, 22 patients (17.2%) were excluded because of CRT generator replacement. Population characteristics were a mean age of 69 +/- 10 years, 28.3% female, New York Heart Association class 3.2 +/- 0.3, LV ejection fraction (LVEF; 29 +/- 6%), and QRS width 146 +/- 23 ms. Cardiac resynchronization therapy implantation was attempted in 106 patients, and first LV lead implantation was obtained in 96 of 106 patients (90.5% primary success). Ten primary implantations failed (9.5%), due to unsuccessful LV lead implants. A second procedure was successfully attempted in six patients with a second more experienced operator (5.7%). Among the remaining four patients, one patient required a surgical epicardial LV lead implantation, and the implantation was not reattempted in the other three patients. The overall success rate of CRT system implantation was 96.2% (102 of 106 patients). Procedure parameters were as follows: LV threshold (1.4 +/- 0.9 V); LV wave amplitude (15 +/- 8 mV); LV impedance (874 +/- 215 ohm); median procedure time (skin to skin), 55 min (45-80); and median of procedure fluoroscopy time, 11 min (6.2-29). In 24 patients (22.6%), difficult procedures requiring >or=85 min of implantation duration occurred. By univariate analysis, predictive factors of difficult implantation were LV ejection fraction (25.6 +/- 6 vs. 30.2 +/- 8%; P = 0.02), LV end-diastolic diameter (72.4 +/- 11 vs. 66 +/- 11 mm; P = 0.01), LV end-systolic diameter (LVESD; 62 +/- 12 vs. 56 +/- 12 mm, P = 0.04), and the operator's experience (very experienced operator vs. less experienced operator, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis, only primary LV lead implantation failure, LVESD, and operator's experience were independently associated with difficult procedures. In this patient subset with primary LV lead implant failure (n = 10), the only independent predictive factor was the LV end-systolic volume (P = 0.03).

Conclusion: In this study, the rate of difficult CRT device implantation procedures approached 25%. Both the degree of LV dysfunction and the operator's experience were independent predictors of surgical difficulties. Left ventricular end-systolic volume was the only independent predictor of primary LV lead implant failure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/euq146DOI Listing
August 2010

Prevalence and risk factors related to infections of cardiac resynchronization therapy devices.

Eur Heart J 2010 Jan 28;31(2):203-10. Epub 2009 Oct 28.

Division of Cardiology, University Jean Monnet of Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne 42000, France.

Aims: Device-related infections (DRI) are not well understood in patients implanted with a cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device. The aims of this study were: (i) to evaluate the prevalence of CRT DRI; (ii) to establish the factors predictive of CRT DRI.

Methods And Results: Between January 2001 and May 2007, CRT implantation was performed in 303 patients (247 men, 82%). The mean follow-up was 31 +/- 19 months. Population characteristics were a mean age of 70 +/- 10 years old; 56 female; aetiology includes (202 dilated and 101 ischaemic cardiomyopathy); NYHA class 3.2 +/- 0.3; LVEF (26 +/- 6%), and a QRS width of 171 +/- 31 ms. Thirteen patients developed a DRI: endocarditis in four, pocket erosion in three, pocket abscess in five, and septicaemia in one. The prevalence of DRI was 4.3%. By univariate analysis, predictive factors of DRI were: procedure time (skin to skin: median of 85 vs. 57.5 min; P = 0.03), re-intervention (54 vs. 6.5%; P < 0.0001), haematoma (31 vs. 8.6% P = 0.01), lead dislodgement (23 vs. 6.2%; P = 0.03), dialysis (23.1 vs. 1.72%; P = 0.003), and procedure type [CRT-ICD (8.6%) vs. CRT PM (1.6%) or system up-grade (1.5%); P = 0.03]. Significant correlations were found between re-intervention and lead dislodgement (r = 0.8; P < 0.001), haematoma (r = 0.2; P < 0.001). Four independent predictive factors of DRI were identified as procedure time (P = 0.002); dialysis (P = 0.0001); re-intervention (P = 0.006), and procedure type (CRT-ICD vs. other procedures; P = 0.01).

Conclusion: This study found that the prevalence of CRT DRI is close to 4.3% at 2.6 years (1.7% per year incidence). Four independent predictive factors of infections were identified including re-intervention, procedure time, dialysis, and primo CRT-ICD implantation. These parameters should be part of the risk-benefit evaluation in patients selected for CRT implantation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehp421DOI Listing
January 2010

Radiofrequency catheter selection based on cavotricuspid angiography compared with a control group with an externally cooled-tip catheter: a randomized pilot study.

J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2009 May 21;20(5):492-8. Epub 2008 Nov 21.

The Jean Monnet University, Faculty of Medicine J. Lisfranc, Department of Cardiology, Saint-Etienne, France.

Background: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI)-dependent atrial flutter (AFL) can be performed using either externally cooled-tip RFA catheters or large-tip (8 mm) catheters. However, experimental and clinical studies suggest that the efficacy of both catheters may vary with CTI anatomy and catheters orientation.

Objectives: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate: a RFA catheter selection based on CTI angiography compared with a control group with an externally cooled-tip catheter together with the risk of an expensive crossover catheter in both groups.

Method: Over a period of 16 months, 119 patients were included and randomized.

Results: When comparing the angiographic group (n = 56) and the externally cooled-tip RFA catheter group (n = 63), the duration of application time with a median of 7 min (interquartile range 4.5-11) versus a median of 10 min (interquartile range 6-20; P = 0.008) and the duration of X-ray exposure with a median of 7 min (interquartile range 4-10) versus a median of 10 min (interquartile range 5-15; P = 0.025) were significantly lower in the angiographic group versus externally cooled-tip catheter group. Furthermore, the number of catheters crossover was significantly higher in the angiographic group versus externally cooled-tip catheter group I (27% vs 7%; P = 0.007).

Conclusions: This study shows that a strategy with a catheter selection based on a CTI angiographic evaluation is superior to an empirical use of an externally cooled-tip catheter during CTI RFA. Thus, angiographic isthmus evaluation predicts the effectiveness of a RFA catheter and the risk of an expensive catheter crossover.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-8167.2008.01367.xDOI Listing
May 2009