Publications by authors named "Lauren McKay"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Decreased Sleep and Subjective Well-Being as Independent Predictors of Injury in Female Collegiate Volleyball Players.

Orthop J Sports Med 2021 Sep 9;9(9):23259671211029285. Epub 2021 Sep 9.

Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

Background: The relationship among sleep duration, subjective well-being, and injury risk in athletes is poorly defined.

Purpose: To evaluate the independent effects of sleep duration, sleep quality, and subjective well-being on in-season injuries in collegiate female volleyball athletes.

Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2.

Methods: During a 9-month competitive season, 17 female National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I volleyball players reported mood, fatigue, stress, soreness, sleep duration (hours), and sleep quality every morning. Well-being measures were recorded from 0 (worst) to 5 (best), and all time-loss injuries were recorded by the team athletic trainer. Separate mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to evaluate the effects of sleep and subjective well-being on in-season injury. Each well-being variable was also included in a separate mixed-effects logistic regression model with sleep duration as a covariate.

Results: A total of 54 injuries were recorded during the study period. Compared with days without an injury, mood, fatigue, stress, soreness, sleep quality, and sleep duration were significantly worse the day before an injury occurred. In the separate prediction models, in-season injury was significantly predicted by fatigue (odds ratio [OR], 0.56 [95% CI, 0.36-0.86]; = .008), mood (OR, 0.52 [95% CI, 0.35-0.78]; = .002), stress (OR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.42-0.94]; = .023), soreness (OR, 0.54 [95% CI, 0.38-0.79]; = .001), sleep quality (OR, 0.49 [95% CI, 0.34-0.7]; < .001), and sleep duration (OR, 0.69 [95% CI, 0.55-0.87]; = .001). In the multivariable models, sleep duration remained a significant independent predictor in each of the subsequent multivariable models (OR, 0.72-0.74; < .05 for all), as did mood (OR, 0.55 [95% CI, 0.36-0.83); = .005) and soreness (OR, 0.57 [95% CI, 0.39-0.83]; = .003), while fatigue (OR, 0.65 [95% CI, 0.42-1]; = .054) and stress (OR, 0.68 [95% CI, 0.45-1]; = .061) no longer reached statistical significance.

Conclusion: Increased sleep duration, mood, and decreased soreness were independently associated with a reduced risk of in-season injury in this cohort of female NCAA volleyball players.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/23259671211029285DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8436316PMC
September 2021

Decreased ventricular size and mass mediate the reduced exercise capacity in adolescents and adults born premature.

Early Hum Dev 2021 Sep 24;160:105426. Epub 2021 Jul 24.

Department of Pediatrics, Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, United States of America.

Background: Premature birth is associated with lower levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) but the underlying mechanisms responsible remain unclear. This study assessed whether differences in cardiac morphology or function mediate differences in CRF among adolescents and young adults born preterm.

Methods: Adolescents and young adults born moderately to extremely premature (gestational age ≤ 32 weeks or birth weight < 1500 g) and age-matched term born participants underwent resting cardiac MRI and maximal exercise testing. Mediation analysis assessed whether individual cardiovascular variables accounted for a significant proportion of the difference in maximal aerobic capacity between groups.

Results: Individuals born preterm had lower VO2max than those born term (41.7 ± 8.6 v 47.5 ± 8.7, p < 0.01). Several variables differed between term and preterm born subjects, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean pulmonary artery pressure, indexed left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDVi), right ventricular end-diastolic volume (RVEDVi), LV mass (LVMi), LV stroke volume index (LVSVi), and LV strain (p < 0.05 for all). Of these variables, LVEDVi, RVEDVi, LVSVi, LVMi, and LV longitudinal strain were significantly related to VO2max (p < 0.05 for all). Significant portions of the difference in VO2max between term and preterm born subjects were mediated by LVEDVi (74.3%, p = 0.010), RVEDVi (50.6%, p = 0.016), and LVMi (43.0%, p = 0.036).

Conclusions: Lower levels of CRF in adolescents and young adults born preterm are mediated by differences in LVEDVi, RVEDVi, and LVMi. This may represent greater risk for long-term cardiac morbidity and mortality in preterm born individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2021.105426DOI Listing
September 2021

The AMPK/p27 Pathway as a Novel Target to Promote Autophagy and Resilience in Aged Cells.

Cells 2021 Jun 8;10(6). Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, 300 N. Duke Street, Durham, NC 27701, USA.

Once believed to solely function as a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p27 is now emerging as a critical mediator of autophagy, cytoskeletal dynamics, cell migration and apoptosis. During periods of metabolic stress, the subcellular location of p27 largely dictates its function. Cytoplasmic p27 has been found to be promote cellular resilience through autophagy and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Nuclear p27, however, inhibits cell cycle progression and makes the cell susceptible to quiescence, apoptosis, and/or senescence. Cellular location of p27 is regulated, in part, by phosphorylation by various kinases, including Akt and AMPK. Aging promotes nuclear localization of p27 and a predisposition to senescence or apoptosis. Here, we will review the role of p27 in healthy and aging cells with a particular emphasis on the interplay between autophagy and apoptosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cells10061430DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8229180PMC
June 2021
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