Publications by authors named "Laure Bonnaud-Ponticelli"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Diversity of Light Sensing Molecules and Their Expression During the Embryogenesis of the Cuttlefish ().

Front Physiol 2020 29;11:521989. Epub 2020 Sep 29.

Laboratoire Biologie des Organismes et Ecosystèmes Aquatiques, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Université, Centre National de la Recherche Française (FRE2030), Université de Caen Normandie, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD 207), Université des Antilles, Paris, France.

Eyes morphologies may differ but those differences are not reflected at the molecular level. Indeed, the ability to perceive light is thought to come from the same conserved gene families: opsins and cryptochromes. Even though cuttlefish (Cephalopoda) are known for their visually guided behaviors, there is a lack of data about the different opsins and cryptochromes orthologs represented in the genome and their expressions. Here we studied the evolutionary history of opsins, cryptochromes but also visual arrestins in molluscs with an emphasis on cephalopods. We identified 6 opsins, 2 cryptochromes and 1 visual arrestin in and we showed these families undergo several duplication events in Mollusca: one duplication in the arrestin family and two in the opsin family. In cuttlefish, we studied the temporal expression of these genes in the eyes of embryos from stage 23 to hatching and their expression in two extraocular tissues, skin and central nervous system (CNS = brain + optic lobes). We showed in embryos that some of these genes (Sof_CRY, Sof_reti-1, Sof_reti-2, Sof_r-opsin1 and Sof_v-arr) are expressed in the eyes and not in the skin or CNS. By looking at a juvenile and an adult , it seems that some of these genes (Sof_r-opsin1 and Sof_reti1) are used for light detection in these extraocular tissues but that they set-up later in development than in the eyes. We also showed that their expression (except for Sof_CRY) undergoes an increase in the eyes from stage 25 to 28 thus confirming their role in the ability of the cuttlefish embryos to perceive light through the egg capsule. This study raises the question of the role of Sof_CRY in the developing eyes in cuttlefish embryos and the role and localization of xenopsins and r-opsin2. Consequently, the diversity of molecular actors involved in light detection both in the eyes and extraocular tissues is higher than previously known. These results open the way for studying new molecules such as those of the signal transduction cascade.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2020.521989DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7553075PMC
September 2020

Three-dimensional structural evolution of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis shell from embryo to adult stages.

J R Soc Interface 2019 09 4;16(158):20190175. Epub 2019 Sep 4.

Unité Biologie des organismes et écosystèmes aquatiques (BOREA), Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, UMR CNRS 7208, Université de Caen Normandie, Sorbonne Université, IRD 207, Université des Antilles, 75005 Paris, France.

The cuttlefish shell is an internal structure with a composition and general organization unique among molluscs. Its formation and the structure-function relation are explored during Sepia officinalis development, using computerized axial tomography scanning (CAT-scan) three-dimensional analyses coupled to physical measurements and modelling. In addition to the evolution of the overall form, modifications of the internal structure were identified from the last third embryonic stages to adult. Most of these changes can be correlated to life cycle stages and environmental constraints. Protected by the capsule during embryonic life, the first internal chambers are sustained by isolated pillars formed from the dorsal to the ventral septum. After hatching, the formation of pillars appears to be a progressive process from isolated points to interconnected pillars forming a wall-delineated labyrinthine structure. We analysed the interpillar space, the connectivity and the tortuosity of the labyrinth. The labyrinthine pillar network is complete just prior to the wintering migration, probably to sustain the need to adapt to high pressure and to allow buoyancy regulation. At that time, the connectivity in the pillar network is compensated by an increase in tortuosity, most probably to reduce liquid diffusion in the shell. Altogether these results suggest adjustment of internal calcified structure development to both external forces and physiological needs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2019.0175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6769316PMC
September 2019

Eye Development in Embryo: What the Uncommon Gene Expression Profiles Tell Us about Eye Evolution.

Front Physiol 2017 24;8:613. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

UMR Biologie des Organismes et Ecosystèmes Aquatiques, Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Universités, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS 7208), Université Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC), Université de Caen Normandie, Institut de Recherche Pour le Développement (IRD207), Université des AntillesParis, France.

In metazoans, there is a remarkable diversity of photosensitive structures; their shapes, physiology, optical properties, and development are different. To approach the evolution of photosensitive structures and visual function, cephalopods are particularly interesting organisms due to their most highly centralized nervous system and their camerular eyes which constitute a convergence with those of vertebrates. The eye morphogenesis in numerous metazoans is controlled mainly by a conserved Retinal Determination Gene Network (RDGN) including , and playing also key developmental roles in non-retinal structures and tissues of vertebrates and . Here we have identified and explored the role of in eye morphogenesis, and nervous structures controlling the visual function in . We compare that with the already shown expressions in eye development of and genes. is the pigment responsible for light sensitivity in metazoan, which correlate to correlate visual function and eye development. We studied expression during retina differentiation. By hybridization, we show that (1) all of the RDGN genes, including , are expressed in the eye area during the early developmental stages but they are not expressed in the retina, unlike , which could have a role in retina differentiation; (2) is expressed in the retina just before vision gets functional, from stage 23 to hatching. Our results evidence a role of , and in eye development. However, the gene network involved in the retinal photoreceptor differentiation remains to be determined. Moreover, for the first time, expression is shown in the embryonic retina of cuttlefish suggesting the evolutionary conservation of the role of in visual phototransduction within metazoans. These findings are correlated with the physiological and behavioral observations suggesting that is able to react to light stimuli from stage 25 of organogenesis on, as soon as the first retinal pigments appear.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2017.00613DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5573735PMC
August 2017

The Pax gene family: Highlights from cephalopods.

PLoS One 2017 2;12(3):e0172719. Epub 2017 Mar 2.

UMR BOREA MNHN/CNRS7208/IRD207/UPMC/UCN/UA, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Universités, Paris, France.

Pax genes play important roles in Metazoan development. Their evolution has been extensively studied but Lophotrochozoa are usually omitted. We addressed the question of Pax paralog diversity in Lophotrochozoa by a thorough review of available databases. The existence of six Pax families (Pax1/9, Pax2/5/8, Pax3/7, Pax4/6, Paxβ, PoxNeuro) was confirmed and the lophotrochozoan Paxβ subfamily was further characterized. Contrary to the pattern reported in chordates, the Pax2/5/8 family is devoid of homeodomain in Lophotrochozoa. Expression patterns of the three main pax classes (pax2/5/8, pax3/7, pax4/6) during Sepia officinalis development showed that Pax roles taken as ancestral and common in metazoans are modified in S. officinalis, most likely due to either the morphological specificities of cephalopods or to their direct development. Some expected expression patterns were missing (e.g. pax6 in the developing retina), and some expressions in unexpected tissues have been found (e.g. pax2/5/8 in dermal tissue and in gills). This study underlines the diversity and functional plasticity of Pax genes and illustrates the difficulty of using probable gene homology as strict indicator of homology between biological structures.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0172719PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5333810PMC
August 2017

First proteomic analyses of the dorsal and ventral parts of the Sepia officinalis cuttlebone.

J Proteomics 2017 01 26;150:63-73. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Unité Biologie des ORganismes et Ecosystèmes Aquatiques (BOREA, UMR 7208), Sorbonne Universités, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université de Caen Normandie, IRD 207, Université des Antilles, CP 26, 43 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris, France. Electronic address:

Protein compounds constituting mollusk shells are known for their major roles in the biomineralization processes. These last years, a great diversity of shell proteins have been described in bivalves and gastropods allowing a better understanding of the calcification control by organic compounds and given promising applications in biotechnology. Here, we analyzed for the first time the organic matrix of the aragonitic Sepia officinalis shell, with an emphasis on protein composition of two different structures: the dorsal shield and the chambered part. Our results highlight an organic matrix mainly composed of polysaccharide, glycoprotein and protein compounds as previously described in other mollusk shells, with quantitative and qualitative differences between the dorsal shield and the chamber part. Proteomic analysis resulted in identification of only a few protein compounds underlining the lack of reference databases for Sepiidae. However, most of them contain domains previously characterized in matrix proteins of aragonitic shell-builder mollusks, suggesting ancient and conserved mechanisms of the aragonite biomineralization processes within mollusks.

Biological Significance: The cuttlefish's inner shell, better known under the name "cuttlebone", is a complex mineral structure unique in mollusks and involved in tissue support and buoyancy regulation. Although it combines useful properties as high compressive strength, high porosity and high permeability, knowledge about organic compounds involved in its building remains limited. Moreover, several cuttlebone organic matrix studies reported data very different from each other or from other mollusk shells. Thus, this study provides 1) an overview of the organization of the main mineral structures found in the S. officinalis shell, 2) a reliable baseline about its organic composition, and 3) a first descriptive proteomic approach of organic matrices found in the two main parts of this shell. These data will contribute to the general knowledge about mollusk biomineralization as well as in the identification of protein compounds involved in the Sepiidae shell calcification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jprot.2016.08.015DOI Listing
January 2017

Could FaRP-Like Peptides Participate in Regulation of Hyperosmotic Stress Responses in Plants?

Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2014 14;5:132. Epub 2014 Aug 14.

Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, DMPA, Sorbonne Universités, UMR BOREA MNHN-CNRS 7208-IRD 207-UPMC-UCBN , Paris , France.

The ability to respond to hyperosmotic stress is one of the numerous conserved cellular processes that most of the organisms have to face during their life. In metazoans, some peptides belonging to the FMRFamide-like peptide (FLP) family were shown to participate in osmoregulation via regulation of ion channels; this is, a well-known response to hyperosmotic stress in plants. Thus, we explored whether FLPs exist and regulate osmotic stress in plants. First, we demonstrated the response of Arabidopsis thaliana cultured cells to a metazoan FLP (FLRF). We found that A. thaliana express genes that display typical FLP repeated sequences, which end in RF and are surrounded by K or R, which is typical of cleavage sites and suggests bioactivity; however, the terminal G, allowing an amidation process in metazoan, seems to be replaced by W. Using synthetic peptides, we showed that amidation appears unnecessary to bioactivity in A. thaliana, and we provide evidence that these putative FLPs could be involved in physiological processes related to hyperosmotic stress responses in plants, urging further studies on this topic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2014.00132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4132272PMC
September 2014