Publications by authors named "Laura Vandelli"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

"Don't call me from the left side…": ischemic stroke in a patient with uncommon vertebral artery dissection.

Neurol Sci 2021 Jun 5. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

Neurology Clinic, Department of Neuroscience, University Hospital of Modena, via Giardini 1355 Baggiovara, ZIP 41100, Modena, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-021-05369-xDOI Listing
June 2021

Platelet Function Monitoring Performed after Carotid Stenting during Endovascular Stroke Treatment Predicts Outcome.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2021 Jul 5;30(7):105800. Epub 2021 May 5.

Stroke Unit, Neurology Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Ospedale Civile, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Modena, Via Giardini 1355, Modena, Emilia Romagna 41126, Italy. Electronic address:

Objectives: Many studies showed that platelet reactivity testing can predict ischemic events after carotid stenting or ischemic stroke. The aim of our study was to assess the role of early platelet function monitoring in predicting 90-days functional outcome, stent thrombosis and hemorrhagic transformation in patients with ischemic stroke treated with endovascular procedures requiring emergent extracranial stenting.

Materials And Methods: We performed a retrospective study on consecutive patients with acute anterior circulation stroke admitted to our hospital between January 2015 and March 2020, in whom platelet reactivity testing was performed within 10 days from stenting. Patients were divided according to validated cutoffs in acetylsalicylic acid and Clopidogrel responders and not responders. Group comparison and regression analyses were performed to identify differences between groups and outcome predictors.

Results: We included in the final analysis 54 patients. Acetylsalicylic acid resistance was an independent predictor of poor 90 days outcome (OR for modified Rankin scale (mRS) ≤ 2: 0.10 95% CI: 0.02 - 0.69) whereas Clopidogrel resistance was an independent predictor of good outcome (OR for mRS ≤ 2: 7.09 95%CI: 1.33 - 37.72). Acetylsalicylic acid resistance was also associated with increased 90-days mortality (OR: 18.42; 95% CI: 1.67 - 203.14).

Conclusion: We found a significant association between resistance to acetylsalicylic acid and poor 90-days functional outcome and between resistance to Clopidogrel and good 90-days functional outcome. If confirmed, our results might improve pharmacological management after acute carotid stenting.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2021.105800DOI Listing
July 2021

Middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke and COVID-19: a case report.

J Neurovirol 2020 12 8;26(6):967-969. Epub 2020 Sep 8.

Stroke Unit - Neurology Clinic, Department of Neuroscience, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria di Modena, Modena, Italy.

We present a clinical case of a patient with SARS-CoV-2 infection and respiratory symptoms, complicated with a pro-thrombotic state involving multiple vascular territories and concomitant interleukin-6 increase. This case underlines the possibility to develop a COVID-19-related coagulopathy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13365-020-00898-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7478241PMC
December 2020

Association of prestroke metformin use, stroke severity, and thrombolysis outcome.

Neurology 2020 07 29;95(4):e362-e373. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

From the Department of Neurology (L.P.W., R.W., A.R.L., S.W.), University Hospital Zurich; Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, Department of Biostatistics (U.H., K.S.), University of Zurich, Switzerland; Department of Neurology (C.H., P.R.), University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Neurology (S.C., N.M.-M., M.T.), University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Finland; Department of Neurology and Center for Stroke Research (C.H.N., J.F.S., H.E.), Charité University Hospital, Berlin, Germany; Stroke Center and Neurology (A.A.P., C.T., H.G., S.T.E.), University Hospital Basel and University Basel; Department of Neurology (A.E., P.M.), University Hospital Lausanne; Department of Neurology (M.R.H., M.A.), Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Switzerland; Department of Neurology and Stroke Center (A.Z.), IRCCS Istituto delle Scienze Neurologiche di Bologna, Maggiore Hospital; Stroke Unit (L.V.), Department of Neuroscience, S'Agostino-Estense Hospital, Modena University Hospital, Italy; Department of Neurology (J.M.C., A.E.G., P.N.), Amsterdam University Medical Centers (AUMC), Location AMC, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Neurology Clinic Belgrade (V.P., D.R.J.), Clinical Centre of Serbia; Medical Faculty (D.R.J.), University of Belgrade, Serbia; Department of Neurology (Y.B., C.B.), University Hospital of Dijon, University of Burgundy; Department of Neurology (G.T., P.S.), Sainte-Anne Hospital, Paris, France; Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences (A.P.), Neurology Clinic, University of Brescia; Stroke Unit (M.M.), ASST Spedali Civili, Brescia, Italy; Department of Neurology (D.L., S.G.), University Hospital of Lille, France; Department of Neurology (M.J.S., G.K.), St. Gallen Cantonal Hospital, Switzerland; Department of Neurology (T.T.), Sahlgrenska University Hospital; Department of Clinical Neurosciences (T.T.), Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden; and Neurorehabilitation Unit (S.T.E.), University Center for Medicine of Aging and Rehabilitation Basel, Felix Platter Hospital, University of Basel, Switzerland.

Objective: To evaluate whether pretreatment with metformin (MET) is associated with less stroke severity and better outcome after IV thrombolysis (IVT), we analyzed a cohort of 1,919 patients with stroke with type 2 diabetes mellitus in a multicenter exploratory analysis.

Methods: Data from patients with diabetes and ischemic stroke treated with IVT were collected within the European Thrombolysis in Ischemic Stroke Patients (TRISP) collaboration. We applied propensity score matching (PSM) to obtain balanced baseline characteristics of patients treated with and without MET.

Results: Of 1,919 patients with stroke with type 2 diabetes who underwent IVT, 757 (39%) had received MET before stroke (MET+), whereas 1,162 (61%) had not (MET-). MET+ patients were younger with a male preponderance. Hypercholesterolemia and pretreatment with statins, antiplatelets, or antihypertensives were more common in the MET+ group. After PSM, the 2 groups were well balanced with respect to demographic and clinical aspects. Stroke severity on admission (NIH Stroke Scale 10.0 ± 6.7 vs 11.3 ± 6.5), 3-month degree of independence on modified Rankin Scale (2 [interquartile range (IQR) 1.0-4.0] vs 3 [IQR 1.0-4.0]), as well as mortality (12.5% vs 18%) were significantly lower in the MET+ group. The frequency of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhages did not differ between groups. HbA1c levels were well-balanced between the groups.

Conclusions: Patients with stroke and diabetes on treatment with MET receiving IVT had less severe strokes on admission and a better functional outcome at 3 months. This suggests a protective effect of MET resulting in less severe strokes as well as beneficial thrombolysis outcome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000009951DOI Listing
July 2020

The Relation Between Aortic Arch Branching Types and the Laterality of Cardio-Embolic Stroke.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2020 Jul 13;29(7):104917. Epub 2020 May 13.

Department of Neuroscience, Stroke Unit - Neurology Clinic, Ospedale Civile di Baggiovara, AOU di Modena, Italy; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35511, Egypt. Electronic address:

Background And Purpose: The trajectory of cardiogenic emboli could be affected by anatomical and flow characteristics of the aortic arch. We aimed to study the relation between the different aortic arch patterns and the laterality of cardiogenic emboli.

Methods: 192 cardioembolic strokes were classified into 3 groups according to the type of the aortic arch; type 1 (n = 69), type 2 (n = 49), type 3 (n = 74). The side and site of the cerebral vessels occlusion were divided into anterior and posterior circulation strokes, and anterior strokes were further subdivided into right or left internal carotid, middle or anterior cerebral arteries occlusion.

Results: Overall, the anterior circulation embolic occlusions were more common than the posterior, and middle cerebral artery more commonly affected than internal carotid artery. The left side propensity was higher either in the total patients' pool or after segregation into atrial fibrillation (AF) and non AF cardio-embolic cases in all types of aortic arch except for type 1 aortic arch in the non AF cases. This propensity tended to get higher with advancement of the aortic arch types but failed to show statistically significant difference between the 3 arch types, however combination of type 2 and 3 arches into a single group showed statistically significant rise in the left side propensity in the total cardioembolic cases (P = 0.039) and in the non AF cardioembolic cases (P = 0.029). The bovine arch also showed increased left side propensity.

Conclusion: Cardioemboli tends to have left anterior cerebrovascular predilection especially with AF. Different geometrical patterns of aortic arch branching seem to affect the laterality of cardioemboli and increase its left side predilection.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2020.104917DOI Listing
July 2020

Novel pathogenic TGFBR1 and SMAD3 variants identified after cerebrovascular events in adult patients with Loeys-dietz syndrome.

Eur J Med Genet 2019 Oct 18;62(10):103727. Epub 2019 Jul 18.

Stroke Unit, Neurology Clinic, Department of Neuroscience, Ospedale Civile "S. Agostino-Estense", Modena University Hospital, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.

Introduction: Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder due to heterozygous pathogenic variants in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling-related genes. LDS types 1-6 are distinguished depending on the involved gene. LDS is characterized by multiple arterial aneurysms and dissections in addition to variable neurological and systemic manifestations. Patient 1: a 68-year-old man was admitted due to an aphasic transient ischemic attack (TIA). Brain CT-scan and CT angiography revealed a chronic and asymptomatic right vertebral artery dissection. Stroke diagnostic panel was unremarkable. His history showed mild stroke familiarity. At age of 49, he was treated for dissecting-aneurysm of the ascending aorta and started anticoagulation therapy. Seven years later, he underwent surgery for dissecting aneurysm involving aortic arch, descending-thoracic aorta, left subclavian artery, and both iliac arteries. Patient 2: a 47-year-old man presented a left hemiparesis due to right middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) occlusion caused by right internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection after sport activity. Despite i.v. thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy, he developed malignant cerebral infarction and underwent decompressive hemicraniectomy. Digital subtraction angiography showed bilateral carotid and vertebral kinking, aneurysmatic dilatation on both common iliac arteries and proximal ectasia of the descending aorta. His father and his uncle died because of an ischemic stroke and a cerebral aneurysm rupture with a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), respectively.

Discussion: in both cases, considering the family history and the multiple dissections and aneurysms, LDS molecular analysis was performed. In patient 1, the novel NM_005902.3 (SMAD3): c.840T > G; p.(Asn280Lys) likely pathogenic variant was identified, thus leading to a diagnosis of LDS type 3. In patient 2, the novel NM_004612.2 (TGFBR1): c.1225T > G; p.(Trp409Gly) likely pathogenic variant was found, allowing for a diagnosis of LDS type 1.

Conclusion: LDS is characterized by genetic and clinical variability. Our report suggests that this genetically-determined connective tissue disorder is probably underestimated, as it might firstly show up with cerebrovascular events, although mild systemic manifestations. These findings could lead to identify people at risk of severe vascular complications (i.e., through genetic consult on asymptomatic relatives), in order to perform adequate vascular assessments and follow-up to prevent complications such as stroke.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2019.103727DOI Listing
October 2019

Fibrinogen concentrate replacement in ischemic stroke patients after recombinant tissue plasminogen activator treatment.

Adv Clin Exp Med 2019 Feb;28(2):219-222

Stroke Unit, Neurology Clinic, Department of Neuroscience, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S. Agostino-Estense, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy.

Background: Post-thrombotic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is experienced by 6-8% of stroke patients and is associated with multiple factors, including acquired coagulopathy induced by the thrombolytic drug.

Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the outcome of the intravenous (IV) administration of fibrinogen concentrate in a series of acute stroke patients who developed iatrogenic fibrinogen critical depletion after IV thrombolysis.

Material And Methods: Of the 39 ischemic stroke patients treated with IV thrombolysis with a severe hypofibrinogenemia requiring infusion with IV fibrinogen concentrate, 30 patients were treated with 2 g of IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA), followed by further doses until the fibrinogen level reached 200 mg/dL in hemorrhagic patients or 100 mg/dL in non-hemorrhagic patients, and 9 were treated with IV rt-PA followed by endovascular thrombectomy.

Results: Preand post-thrombolysis National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were statistically different for the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test overall (p = 0.0002), at 24-hour evaluation (p = 0.0455) and at 7-day assessment (p = 0.0006). Within the first 7 days post-thrombolysis, the brain computed tomography (CT) scans showed that 20/39 (51.28%) patients had ICH. Of the whole sample, 25.6% of the ICH patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), according to National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) classification. After rt-PA treatment, the median pre-thrombolysis fibrinogenemia of 332 mg/dL significantly dropped to 133 mg/dL (p < 0.0001). After the fibrinogen concentrate infusion, the median level of fibrinogenemia rose to 160 mg/dL, which was significantly higher than the median postthrombolysis levels (p < 0.0001). Recanalization was observed in 25/28 patients (89.29%): complete in 18 and partial in 7 patients. After fibrinogen IV infusion, no thrombotic complications were seen in 37 out of 39 patients (94.77%); 2/39 (0.05%) patients experienced a pulmonary embolism, 1 of them a segmental one.

Conclusions: This study showed the clinical safety of administering IV fibrinogen concentrate in order to increase plasma fibrinogen levels in a series of acute stroke patients with iatrogenic fibrinogen depletion after IV thrombolysis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.17219/acem/84936DOI Listing
February 2019

Intravenous thrombolysis and platelet count.

Neurology 2018 02 24;90(8):e690-e697. Epub 2018 Jan 24.

From the Stroke Center and Department of Neurology (H.G., D.J.S., C.T., R.L., A. Polymeris, P.A.L., N.P., S.T.E.), University Hospital Basel and University of Basel, Switzerland; Department of Clinical Neurosciences (H.G., A.S.A.S.), University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Neurology (D.S., S.R., S.C., G.S., T.T.), Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland; Department of Neurology (C.H., H.A., C.G., P.A.R.), University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Neurology (S.M.Z., T.P.Z., Y.B.R., P.J.N.), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; University Lille (S.M., D.L., C.C.), Inserm, CHU Lille, U1171-Degenerative & Vascular Cognitive Disorders, France; Department of Neurology (O.B., P.M.), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Stroke Unit (A.Z., L.V.), Department of Neuroscience, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S. Agostino-Estense, AUSL Modena, Italy; Neurology Clinic (V.P., D.R.J.), Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade; Department of Neurology (G.K.), Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Switzerland; Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences (A. Pezzini), Neurology Clinic, University of Brescia, Italy; Medical Faculty (D.R.J.), University of Belgrade, Serbia; Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology (T.T.), Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg; Department of Neurology (T.T.), Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden; and Neurorehabilitation Unit (S.T.E.), University of Basel and University Center for Medicine of Aging and Rehabilitation, Felix Platter Hospital, Switzerland.

Objective: To study the effect of platelet count (PC) on bleeding risk and outcome in stroke patients treated with IV thrombolysis (IVT) and to explore whether withholding IVT in PC < 100 × 10/L is supported.

Methods: In this prospective multicenter, IVT register-based study, we compared PC with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH; Second European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study [ECASS II] criteria), poor outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 3-6), and mortality at 3 months. PC was used as a continuous and categorical variable distinguishing thrombocytopenia (<150 × 10/L), thrombocytosis (>450 × 10/L), and normal PC (150-450 × 10/L [reference group]). Moreover, PC < 100 × 10/L was compared to PC ≥ 100 × 10/L. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from the logistic regression models were calculated.

Results: Among 7,533 IVT-treated stroke patients, 6,830 (90.7%) had normal PC, 595 (7.9%) had thrombocytopenia, and 108 (1.4%) had thrombocytosis. Decreasing PC (every 10 × 10/L) was associated with increasing risk of sICH (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.05) but decreasing risk of poor outcome (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.98-0.99) and mortality (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.98-0.99). The risk of sICH was higher in patients with thrombocytopenic than in patients with normal PC (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.24-2.43). However, the risk of poor outcome (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.39-1.97) and mortality (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.83-1.44) did not differ significantly. Thrombocytosis was associated with mortality (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.21-3.37). Forty-four (0.3%) patients had PC < 100 × 10/L. Their risks of sICH (OR 1.56, 95% CI 0.48-5.07), poor outcome (OR 1.63, 95% CI 0.82-3.24), and mortality (OR 1.38, 95% CI 0.64-2.98) did not differ significantly from those of patients with PC ≥ 100 × 10/L.

Conclusion: Lower PC was associated with increased risk of sICH, while higher PC indicated increased mortality. Our data suggest that PC modifies outcome and complications in individual patients, while withholding IVT in all patients with PC < 100 × 10/L is challenged.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000004982DOI Listing
February 2018

Impact on Prehospital Delay of a Stroke Preparedness Campaign: A SW-RCT (Stepped-Wedge Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial).

Stroke 2017 12 3;48(12):3316-3322. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

From the Geriatrics Ward-Stroke Care Section, (L.D., A.A.), Research and Innovation Unit (C.C., B.M., E.I.), and Stroke Care Program (U.S., P.C., C.Z.), University Hospital of Parma, Italy; Stroke Unit, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S Agostino Estense, University Hospital of Modena, Italy (A.Z., M.B., L. Vaghi, S.O., F.B., G.B., L. Vandelli); Stroke Unit, Neurology Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy (G.M., M.L.Z., E.P., D.M.); Department of Neurology, Guglielmo da Saliceto Hospital, Piacenza, Italy (D.G., I.I.); Neurology Unit, Vaio Fidenza Hospital, Italy (E.M., A.G.); Department of Oncology and Hemato-oncology, University of Milan, Italy (S.R.); and Institute of Communication and Health, University of Svizzera Italiana, Lugano, Switzerland (P.J.S.).

Background And Purpose: Public campaigns to increase stroke preparedness have been tested in different contexts, showing contradictory results. We evaluated the effectiveness of a stroke campaign, designed specifically for the Italian population in reducing prehospital delay.

Methods: According to an SW-RCT (Stepped-Wedge Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial) design, the campaign was launched in 4 provinces in the northern part of the region Emilia Romagna at 3-month intervals in randomized sequence. The units of analysis were the patients admitted to hospital, with stroke and transient ischemic attack, over a time period of 15 months, beginning 3 months before the intervention was launched in the first province to allow for baseline data collection. The proportion of early arrivals (within 2 hours of symptom onset) was the primary outcome. Thrombolysis rate and some behavioral end points were the secondary outcomes. Data were analyzed using a fixed-effect model, adjusting for cluster and time trends.

Results: We enrolled 1622 patients, 912 exposed and 710 nonexposed to the campaign. The proportion of early access was nonsignificantly lower in exposed patients (354 [38.8%] versus 315 [44.4%]; adjusted odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.60-1.08; =0.15). As for secondary end points, an increase was found for stroke recognition, which approximated but did not reach statistical significance (=0.07).

Conclusions: Our campaign was not effective in reducing prehospital delay. Even if some limitations of the intervention, mainly in terms of duration, are taken into account, our study demonstrates that new communication strategies should be tested before large-scale implementation.

Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01881152.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.018135DOI Listing
December 2017

Platelet Function Testing in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Observational Study.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2017 Aug 30;26(8):1864-1873. Epub 2017 May 30.

Stroke Unit, Neurology Clinic, Department of Neuroscience, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S. Agostino-Estense, University Hospital of Modena, Modena, Italy. Electronic address:

Background: The measurement of platelet reactivity in patients with stroke undergoing antiplatelet therapies is not commonly performed in clinical practice. We assessed the prevalence of therapy responsiveness in patients with stroke and further investigated differences between patients on prevention therapy at stroke onset and patients naive to antiplatelet medications. We also sought differences in responsiveness between etiological subtypes and correlations between Clopidogrel responsiveness and genetic polymorphisms.

Methods: A total of 624 stroke patients on antiplatelet therapy were included. Two different groups were identified: "non-naive patients", and "naive patients". Platelet function was measured with multiple electrode aggregometry, and genotyping assays were used to determine CYP2C19 polymorphisms.

Results: Aspirin (ASA) responsiveness was significantly more frequent in naive patients compared with non-naive patients (94.9% versus 82.6%, P < .0010). A better responsiveness to ASA compared with Clopidogrel or combination therapy was found in the entire population (P < .0010), in non-naive patients (P < .0253), and in naive patients (P < .0010). Multivariate analysis revealed a strong effect of Clopidogrel as a possible "risk factor" for unresponsiveness (odds ratio 3.652, P < .0001). No difference between etiological subgroups and no correlations between responsiveness and CYP2C19 polymorphisms were found.

Conclusion: In our opinion, platelet function testing could be potentially useful in monitoring the biological effect of antiplatelet agents. A substantial proportion of patients with stroke on ASA were "resistant", and the treatment with Clopidogrel was accompanied by even higher rates of unresponsiveness. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess whether aggregometry might supply individualized prognostic information and whether it can be considered a valid tool for future prevention strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2017.04.023DOI Listing
August 2017

Usefulness of Thromboelastography in the Detection and Management of Tissue Plasminogen Activator-Associated Hyperfibrinolysis.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2017 Feb 23;26(2):e29-e31. Epub 2016 Nov 23.

Stroke Unit, Department of Neuroscience, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, NOCSAE, AUSL Modena, Baggiovara, Modena, Italy. Electronic address:

Rotation thromboelastometry is a viscoelastometric method that provides a rapid assessment of a patient's hemostatic processes in emergency settings, allowing prompt identification of specific coagulation abnormalities. Its results thus might guide targeted replacement therapy in hemorrhagic conditions, in case of platelet or coagulation factor deficiency, or hyperfibrinolysis, which is difficult to identify otherwise. Although currently used in emergency and traumatic surgery, there are limited data about thromboelastometry in ischemic stroke, particularly in monitoring the coagulative response to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator after intravenous thrombolysis (IVT). Here we report a case of ischemic stroke complicated by a remote asymptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after IVT and additional endovascular therapy that has been successfully treated with intravenous infusion of tranexamic acid after the detection of the status of hyperfibrinolysis provided by thromboelastometry. Further studies are needed to provide the potential usefulness of thromboelastometry and tranexamic acid in ischemic stroke complicated by intracranial bleeding.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2016.10.039DOI Listing
February 2017

Familial paraganglioma syndrome: a rare cause of carotid artery occlusion.

J Neurol 2016 Dec 20;263(12):2544-2546. Epub 2016 Oct 20.

Stroke Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology Clinic, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Nuovo Ospedale Civile "S.Agostino-Estense", AUSL Modena, Via Giardini 1355 Baggiovara, 41100, Modena, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-016-8317-7DOI Listing
December 2016

Serum cholesterol levels, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors and the risk of intracerebral haemorrhage. The Multicenter Study on Cerebral Haemorrhage in Italy (MUCH-Italy).

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2016 09 21;87(9):924-9. Epub 2016 Mar 21.

Stroke Unit, AOU Senese, Siena, Italia.

Objective: Although a concern exists that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) might increase the risk of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH), the contribution of these agents to the relationship between serum cholesterol and disease occurrence has been poorly investigated.

Methods: We compared consecutive patients having ICH with age and sex-matched stroke-free control subjects in a case-control analysis, as part of the Multicenter Study on Cerebral Haemorrhage in Italy (MUCH-Italy), and tested the presence of interaction effects between total serum cholesterol levels and statins on the risk of ICH.

Results: A total of 3492 cases (mean age, 73.0±12.7 years; males, 56.6%) and 3492 control subjects were enrolled. Increasing total serum cholesterol levels were confirmed to be inversely associated with ICH. We observed a statistical interaction between total serum cholesterol levels and statin use for the risk of haemorrhage (Interaction OR (IOR), 1.09; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.12). Increasing levels of total serum cholesterol were associated with a decreased risk of ICH within statin strata (average OR, 0.87; 95% CI 0.86 to 0.88 for every increase of 0.26 mmol/l of total serum cholesterol concentrations), while statin use was associated with an increased risk (OR, 1.54; 95% CI 1.31 to 1.81 of the average level of total serum cholesterol). The protective effect of serum cholesterol against ICH was reduced by statins in strictly lobar brain regions more than in non-lobar ones.

Conclusions: Statin therapy and total serum cholesterol levels exhibit interaction effects towards the risk of ICH. The magnitude of such effects appears higher in lobar brain regions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2015-312736DOI Listing
September 2016

Intravenous Thrombolysis in Patients Dependent on the Daily Help of Others Before Stroke.

Stroke 2016 Feb;47(2):450-6

From the Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland (H.G., S.C., D.J.S., C.T., N.P., L.H.B., P.A.L., S.T.E.); Department of Neurology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland (D.S., J.P., S.C., G.S., T.T.); Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (S.M.Z., T.P.Z., Y.B.R., P.J.N.); Department of Neurology and Center for Stroke Research, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany (J.F.S., H.E., P.K., C.H.N.); Department of Neurology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland (O.B., P.M.); Department of Neurology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany (C.H., P.R.); University Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, U1171-Degenerative and Vascular Cognitive Disorders, Lille, France (S.M., D.L., C.C.); Stroke Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S. Agostino-Estense, AUSL Modena, Modena, Italy (A.Z., L.V.); Department of Neurology, Kantonsspital St. Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland (G.K.); Department of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Neurology Clinic, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy (A.P.); Department of Neurology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Beograd, Serbia (V.P.); Department of Neurology, University Hospital, and Dijon Stroke Registry, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France (Y.B.); Department of Neurology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden (T.T.); and Department for Medicine of Aging and Rehabilitation, University Center, Felix Platter Hospital, Basel, Switzerland (S.T.E.).

Background And Purpose: We compared outcome and complications in patients with stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) who could not live alone without help of another person before stroke (dependent patients) versus independent ones.

Methods: In a multicenter IVT-register-based cohort study, we compared previously dependent (prestroke modified Rankin Scale score, 3-5) versus independent (prestroke modified Rankin Scale score, 0-2) patients. Outcome measures were poor 3-month outcome (not reaching at least prestroke modified Rankin Scale [dependent patients]; modified Rankin Scale score of 3-6 [independent patients]), death, and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (OR [95% confidence interval]) were calculated.

Results: Among 7430 IVT-treated patients, 489 (6.6%) were dependent and 6941 (93.4%) were independent. Previous stroke, dementia, heart, and bone diseases were the most common causes of preexisting dependency. Dependent patients were more likely to die (ORunadjusted, 4.55 [3.74-5.53]; ORadjusted, 2.19 [1.70-2.84]). Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred equally frequent (4.8% versus 4.5%). Poor outcome was more frequent in dependent (60.5%) than in independent (39.6%) patients, but the adjusted ORs were similar (ORadjusted, 0.95 [0.75-1.21]). Among survivors, the proportion of patients with poor outcome did not differ (35.7% versus 31.3%). After adjustment for age and stroke severity, the odds of poor outcome were lower in dependent patients (ORadjusted, 0.64 [0.49-0.84]).

Conclusions: IVT-treated stroke patients who were dependent on the daily help of others before stroke carry a higher mortality risk than previously independent patients. The risk of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and the likelihood of poor outcome were not independently influenced by previous dependency. Among survivors, poor outcome was avoided at least as effectively in previously dependent patients. Thus, withholding IVT in previously dependent patients might not be justified.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.011674DOI Listing
February 2016

Fibrinogen decrease after intravenous thrombolysis in ischemic stroke patients is a risk factor for intracerebral hemorrhage.

J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 2015 Feb 11;24(2):394-400. Epub 2014 Dec 11.

Stroke Unit, Department of Neuroscience, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S. Agostino-Estense, AUSL Modena, Modena, Italy. Electronic address:

Background: Intravenous thrombolysis is an effective treatment in acute stroke patients, but it increases the risk of intracerebral hemorrhages. Our aim is to establish if fibrinogen depletion increases the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage after intravenous thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

Methods: In 104 ischemic stroke patients, treated with intravenous thrombolysis, we assessed the rate of intracerebral hemorrhages documented by computed tomographic scan at 24 hours and within 7 days post-treatment. Fibrinogen levels were determined at 2 hours after therapy: patients were classified as belonging to "low fibrinogen group" if levels decreased to less than 2 g/L and/or by 25% or more. Fibrinogen levels and other known hemorrhagic risk factors were studied using univariate and multivariate analyses.

Results: During the first 7 days, an intracerebral hemorrhage was detected in 24 patients (23.1%), and only 6 of these (5.8%) experienced symptomatic bleeding; 41 patients were included in the low fibrinogen group. Among the 24 hemorrhages, 18 occurred in the low fibrinogen group and 6 in the "normal fibrinogen group": the bleeding rate in the low fibrinogen group was significantly higher (43.9%) than that in the normal fibrinogen group (9.5%; odds ratio [OR] 7.43, P < .001). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that only clinical severity (OR 1.15, P < .001) and hypofibrinogenemia (OR 7.47, P < .001) were significantly associated with brain bleeding at 7 days and at 24 hours (P = .008).

Conclusions: An early fibrinogen reduction seems to increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage after rtPA treatment in ischemic stroke. Fibrinogen assessment could be a rapid, inexpensive, and widely available tool to help the identification of patients at higher risk of bleeding.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2014.09.005DOI Listing
February 2015