Publications by authors named "Laura S Huff"

7 Publications

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Resident perspectives on a dermatology Quality Improvement curriculum: the University of Colorado experience.

Dermatol Online J 2016 Apr 18;22(4). Epub 2016 Apr 18.

University of Colorado School of Medicine.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have prioritized the objective of optimizing quality healthcare though quality improvement initiatives, yet research on dermatology-specific QI programs and their perceptions among dermatology residents remains limited. We explore residents' opinions of a dermatology-specific QI scholarly project curriculum implemented at University of Colorado Denver (UCD) in 2010 and also evaluate residents' attitudes regarding the value of this curriculum in aiding them to meet ACGME core competencies.
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April 2016

Chlorpromazine-induced skin pigmentation with corneal and lens opacities.

Cutis 2014 May;93(5):247-50

Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Denver, 1665 Aurora Ct, PO Box 6510 F703, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.

Chlorpromazine is known to cause abnormal oculocutaneous pigmentation in sun-exposed areas. We present the case of a psychiatric patient who developed blue-gray pigmentation of the skin as well as corneal and lens opacities following 7 years of chlorpromazine treatment. Ten months after discontinuation of chlorpromazine, the skin discoloration and anterior lens deposits showed partial improvement, but the corneal deposits remained unchanged. A review of the literature on the reversibility of chlorpromazine-induced abnormal oculocutaneous pigmentation also is provided.
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May 2014

Measuring sun damage at the grocery store: Mychelle Dermaceuticals and Whole Foods Market bring UV photography to aisle #7.

JAMA Dermatol 2014 Jun;150(6):589-90

Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora3Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora4Department of Dermatology, Denver Veterans Administratio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.10279DOI Listing
June 2014

Sun damage in ultraviolet photographs correlates with phenotypic melanoma risk factors in 12-year-old children.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2012 Oct 9;67(4):587-97. Epub 2012 Mar 9.

Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

Background: Ultraviolet (UV) photography has been used to motivate sun safety in behavioral interventions. The relationship between sun damage shown in UV photographs and melanoma risk has not been systematically investigated.

Objective: To examine the relationship between severity of sun damage in UV photographs and phenotypic melanoma risk factors in children.

Methods: UV, standard visible and cross-polarized photographs were recorded for 585 children. Computer software quantified sun damage. Full-body nevus counts, skin color by colorimetry, facial freckling, hair and eye color were collected in skin examinations. Demographic data were collected in telephone interviews of parents.

Results: Among 12-year-old children, sun damage shown in UV photographs correlated with phenotypic melanoma risk factors. Sun damage was greatest for children who were non-Hispanic white and those who had red hair, blue eyes, increased facial freckling, light skin and greater number of nevi (all P values < .001). Results were similar for standard visible and cross-polarized photographs. Freckling was the strongest predictor of sun damage in visible and UV photographs. All other phenotypic melanoma risk factors were also predictors for the UV photographs.

Limitations: Differences in software algorithms used to score the photographs could produce different results.

Conclusion: UV photographs portray more sun damage in children with higher risk for melanoma based on phenotype. Therefore sun protection interventions targeting those with greater sun damage on UV photographs will target those at higher melanoma risk. This study establishes reference ranges dermatologists can use to assess sun damage in their pediatric patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2011.11.922DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3888435PMC
October 2012

Defining an acceptable period of time from melanoma biopsy to excision.

Dermatol Reports 2012 Jan 17;4(1):e2. Epub 2012 Jan 17.

Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; ; Dermatology Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO; ; Colorado School of Public Health Department of Epidemiology, Aurora, CO, USA.

Melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer and it is the second most common cancer among adolescents and young adults. The aim of this work is to determine if surgical intervals differ between four different clinics and between departments within the hospitals, and to compare these to industry standards. Surgical intervals were measured through retrospective chart review at four dermatology clinics. Of 205 melanoma cases, clinic and departmental median surgical intervals ranged 15-36.5 days and 26-48 days, respectively. There was significant association between clinic and time between biopsy and pathology report, time between pathology report and excision, and total surgical interval (P<0.0001, P=0.03, and P<0.0001 respectively). There was significant association between department and time between pathology report and excision, and surgical interval (P<0.0001, and P=0.003 respectively). Pair-wise comparisons detected significantly longer intervals between some clinics and departments (maximum difference 67.3%, P<0.0001). Hypothesis-based, informal guidelines recommend treatment within 4-6 weeks. In this study, median surgical intervals varied significantly between clinics and departments, but nearly all were within a 6-week frame.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/dr.2012.e2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4212669PMC
January 2012

Internet social networking sites and the future of dermatology journals: promises and perils.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2011 Sep;65(3):e81-e83

Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado; Dermatology Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, Colorado; Colorado School of Public Health Department of Epidemiology, Aurora, Colorado. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2011.04.028DOI Listing
September 2011

What keeps patients from adhering to a home blood pressure program?

J Am Board Fam Med 2011 Jul-Aug;24(4):370-9

Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 80220, USA.

Background: Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) predicts cardiovascular risk and increases hypertension control. Non-participation in HBPM is prevalent and decreases the potential benefit.

Methods: Telephone surveys were conducted with a random quota sample of non-participants in a HBPM program, which supplied a complimentary automated blood pressure cuff and utilized a centralized reporting system. Questioning assessed use of monitors, perceived benefit, communication with providers, and barriers.

Results: There were 320 completed surveys (response rate 53%). Of non-participants, 70.2% still used HBPM cuffs and 58% communicated values to providers. Spanish-speakers were 4.4 times more likely to not use cuffs (95% CI, 2.22-8.885). Barriers to participation were largely personal (forgetting, not having time, or self-described laziness). Reasons for not communicating readings with providers were largely clinic factors (no doctor visit, doctor didn't ask, thinking doctor wouldn't care). Lack of knowledge of HBPM and program design also contributed. After being surveyed, patients were over three times more likely to use the central reporting system.

Discussion: Most non-participants still used HBPM and communicated values to providers, suggesting many "drop-outs" may still receive clinical benefit. However, much valuable information is not utilized. Future programs should focus on reminder systems, patient motivation, education, and minimizing time involvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2011.04.100266DOI Listing
February 2012