Publications by authors named "Laura Nance"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluation of a Lifestyle Change Worksite Weight Management Program Across Multiple Employers and Sites.

J Occup Environ Med 2018 12;60(12):1112-1115

Weight Management Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (Dr Hales, Ms Turner, Dr Sword, Ms Nance, Dr O'Neil); College of Health Professions, Physical Therapy Division, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina (Dr Sword); Weight Management Center, Department of Surgery, Wake Forest Baptist Health, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (Dr Brown).

Objective: The aim of the study was to assess weight loss outcomes among participants (N = 1090) of a weight management program across multiple worksites (N = 10) in a retrospective analysis.

Methods: Weekly classes focused on diet, exercise, and behavior change. One employer provided incentives for weight loss and two incentivized weight loss and class attendance.

Results: Mean weight loss (N = 1090; 79.3% female) was -2.9% (SD = 3.0%). Average number of classes attended was 6.87/10 (SD = 2.9) and was significantly correlated with percent weight change (r = -0.46; P < 0.001). Participants incentivized for attendance attended significantly more classes (M = 7.5, SD = 2.8) than did those not so incentivized (M = 6.4, SD = 2.9, P < 0.001), but did not lose more weight (P = 0.24). Participants incentivized for weight loss did not lose significantly more weight than those not so incentivized (P = 0.26).

Conclusions: These data support the effectiveness of this worksite program. Utilizing incentives to promote class attendance may be beneficial for increasing engagement in similar programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000001442DOI Listing
December 2018

Dietary adherence and satisfaction with a bean-based high-fiber weight loss diet: a pilot study.

ISRN Obes 2013 29;2013:915415. Epub 2013 Oct 29.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 67 President Street, Suite 410, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.

Objective. Dietary fiber can reduce hunger and enhance satiety, but fiber intake during hypocaloric weight loss diets typically falls short of recommended levels. We examined the nutritional effects and acceptability of two high-fiber hypocaloric diets differing in sources of fiber: (a) beans or (b) fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Methods. Subjects were 2 men, 18 women, mean age = 46.9, and mean BMI = 30.6. Subjects completed 3-day food diaries in each of the two baseline weeks. Subjects were then randomized to four weeks on one of two 1400-calorie diets including 25-35 g fiber primarily from 1.5 cups beans/day or from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Recommended fiber-rich foods were provided. Subjects kept weekly 3-day food diaries and were assessed weekly. Results. Diet conditions did not differ on outcome measures. Both diets increased fiber intake from 16.6 g/day (SD = 7.1) at baseline to (treatment average) 28.4 g/day (SD = 6.5) (P < 0.001). Fiber intake was consistent over treatment. Caloric intake dropped from 1623.1 kcal/day (SD = 466.9) (baseline) to 1322.2 kcal/day (SD = 275.8) (P = 0.004). Mean weight loss was 1.4 kg (SD = 1.5; P < 0.001). Energy density and self-reported hunger decreased (P's < 0.01) while self-reported fullness increased (P < 0.05). Both diets were rated as potentially acceptable as long as six months. Conclusions. Both diets significantly increased fiber intake by 75%, increased satiation, and reduced hunger. Results support increasing fiber in weight loss diets with a variety of fiber sources.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/915415DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3901975PMC
February 2014