Publications by authors named "Laura May Miles"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Natural History of Chronic Inducible Urticaria in a Pediatric Cohort.

Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2021 Apr 1:1-8. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Québec, Canada.

Background: Some forms of chronic urticaria (CU) can be specifically attributed to a response to a definite trigger, referred to as chronic inducible urticaria (CIndU). We aimed to assess the demographics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, natural history, and management of pediatric patients with CIndU.

Methods: Over a 6-year period, children presenting to the allergy clinic at the Montreal Children's Hospital (MCH) with CIndU were prospectively recruited. CU was defined as the presence of wheals and/or angioedema, occurring for at least 6 weeks. A standardized diagnostic test was used to establish the presence of a specific form of urticaria. Resolution was defined as the absence of hives for 1 year without treatment.

Results: Sixty-four patients presented with CIndU, of which 51.6% were male, with a median age of 12.5 (interquartile range 7.3, 15.9) years. Cold CU and cholinergic CU were the most common subtypes (60.3 and 41.3%, respectively). Basophil counts were undetectable in 48.4% of the cases, and C-reactive protein levels were elevated in 7.8% of patients. Of all cases, 71.4% were controlled with second-generation antihistamines. The resolution rate was of 45.3% (95% confidence interval 33.1-57.5%), based on per-protocol population within the 6-year course of the study. Resolution was more likely in patients who presented with well-controlled urticaria control test scores and elevated CD63 counts and in those suffering from thyroid comorbidity.

Conclusion: The natural history of CIndU resolution in pediatric patients was relatively low and was associated with elevated CD63 levels, as well as thyroid comorbidity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000514757DOI Listing
April 2021

Community Use of Epinephrine for the Treatment of Anaphylaxis: A Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2021 Feb 4. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Background: Community use of epinephrine for the treatment of anaphylaxis is low. Knowledge of rates of epinephrine use in the pre-hospital setting along with identification of barriers to its use will contribute to the development of policies and guidelines.

Objectives: A search was conducted on PubMed and Embase in April 2020. Our systematic review focused on 4 domains: (1) epinephrine use in the pre-hospital setting; (2) barriers to epinephrine use in the pre-hospital setting; (3) cost evaluation and cost-effectiveness of epinephrine use; and (4) programs and strategies to improve epinephrine use during anaphylaxis.

Methods: Two meta-analyses with logit transformation were conducted to: (1) calculate the pooled estimate of the rate of epinephrine use in the pre-hospital setting among cases of anaphylaxis and (2) calculate the pooled estimate of the rate of biphasic reactions among all cases of anaphylaxis.

Results: Epinephrine use in the pre-hospital setting was significantly higher for children compared with adults (20.98% [95% confidence interval (CI): 16.38%, 26.46%] vs 7.17% [95% CI: 2.71%, 17.63%], respectively, P = .0027). The pooled estimate of biphasic reactions among all anaphylaxis cases was 3.92% (95% CI: 2.88%, 5.32%). Our main findings indicate that pre-hospital use of epinephrine in anaphylaxis remains suboptimal. Major barriers to the use of epinephrine were identified as low prescription rates of epinephrine autoinjectors and lack of stock epinephrine in schools, which was determined to be cost-effective. Finally, in reviewing programs and strategies, numerous studies have engineered effective methods to promote adequate and timely use of epinephrine.

Conclusion: The main findings of our study demonstrated that across the globe, prompt epinephrine use in cases of anaphylaxis remains suboptimal. For practical recommendations, we would suggest considering stock epinephrine in schools and food courts to increase the use of epinephrine in the community. We recommend use of pamphlets in public areas (ie, malls, food courts, etc.) to assist in recognizing anaphylaxis and after that with prompt epinephrine administration, to avoid the rare risk of fatality in anaphylaxis cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2021.01.038DOI Listing
February 2021

When and how pediatric anaphylaxis cases reach the emergency department: Findings from the Cross-Canada Anaphylaxis Registry.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2020 04 31;8(4):1406-1409.e2. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2019.10.009DOI Listing
April 2020