Publications by authors named "Laura M Anderson"

12 Publications

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Assessment of 2 Hair Removal Methods in New Zealand White Rabbits ().

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 2022 May 28;61(3):296-303. Epub 2022 Feb 28.

Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD.

Rabbits are frequently used as surgical models in research. However, studies assessing the effects of various hair removal methods on wound healing and surgical site infection (SSI) in rabbits are sparse. Here we evaluated the effects of 2 hair removal methods-clipping with electric clippers and using a commercial depilatory agent-on wound healing and SSI as assessed via wound scoring and histology. Incisions were assigned ASEPSIS scores on days 3 and 7. To assess whether the hair removal methods influenced aseptic preparation, swabs for bacterial culture were obtained just after hair removal on day 0, after aseptic skin preparation on day 0, and on day 1. For histopathologic assessment, full-thickness punch biopsies were obtained on days 0, 1, 3, 7, and 21. Histopathology revealed significant differences between the 2 methods, with the depilatory method having consistently higher scores (that is, more abnormalities). We conclude that for a surgical preparation regimen, clipping is safer, more efficacious, and less traumatic to tissues in rabbits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.30802/AALAS-JAALAS-21-000110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9137288PMC
May 2022

The Neurobehavioral Effects of Buprenorphine and Meloxicam on a Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury Model in the Rat.

Front Neurol 2021 12;12:746370. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Blast-Induced Neurotrauma Branch, Center for Military Psychiatry and Neuroscience, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, United States.

Previous findings have indicated that pain relieving medications such as opioids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be neuroprotective after traumatic brain injury in rodents, but only limited studies have been performed in a blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) model. In addition, many pre-clinical TBI studies performed in rodents did not use analgesics due to the possibility of neuroprotection or other changes in cognitive, behavioral, and pathology outcomes. To examine this in a pre-clinical setting, we examined the neurobehavioral changes in rats given a single pre-blast dose of meloxicam, buprenorphine, or no pain relieving medication and exposed to tightly-coupled repeated blasts in an advanced blast simulator and evaluated neurobehavioral functions up to 28 days post-blast. A 16.7% mortality rate was recorded in the rats treated with buprenorphine, which might be attributed to the physiologically depressive side effects of buprenorphine in combination with isoflurane anesthesia and acute brain injury. Rats given buprenorphine, but not meloxicam, took more time to recover from the isoflurane anesthesia given just before blast. We found that treatment with meloxicam protected repeated blast-exposed rats from vestibulomotor dysfunctions up to day 14, but by day 28 the protective effects had receded. Both pain relieving medications seemed to promote short-term memory deficits in blast-exposed animals, whereas vehicle-treated blast-exposed animals showed only a non-significant trend toward worsening short-term memory by day 27. Open field exploratory behavior results showed that blast exposed rats treated with meloxicam engaged in significantly more locomotor activities and possibly a lesser degree of responses thought to reflect anxiety and depressive-like behaviors than any of the other groups. Rats treated with analgesics to alleviate possible pain from the blast ate more than their counterparts that were not treated with analgesics, which supports that both analgesics were effective in alleviating some of the discomfort that these rats potentially experienced post-blast injury. These results suggest that meloxicam and, to a lesser extent buprenorphine alter a variety of neurobehavioral functions in a rat bTBI model and, because of their impact on these neurobehavioral changes, may be less than ideal analgesic agents for pre-clinical studies evaluating these neurobehavioral responses after TBI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2021.746370DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8545992PMC
October 2021

Healthcare Shift Workers' Temporal Habits for Eating, Sleeping, and Light Exposure: A Multi-Instrument Pilot Study.

J Circadian Rhythms 2020 Oct 21;18. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, US.

Background: Circadian misalignment can impair healthcare shift workers' physical and mental health, resulting in sleep deprivation, obesity, and chronic disease. This multidisciplinary research team assessed eating patterns and sleep/physical activity of healthcare workers on three different shifts (day, night, and rotating-shift). To date, no study of real-world shift workers' daily eating and sleep has utilized a largely-objective measurement.

Method: During this fourteen-day observational study, participants wore two devices (Actiwatch and Bite Technologies counter) to measure physical activity, sleep, light exposure, and eating time. Participants also reported food intake via food diaries on personal mobile devices.

Results: In fourteen (5 day-, 5 night-, and 4 rotating-shift) participants, no baseline difference in BMI was observed. Overall, rotating-shift workers consumed fewer calories and had less activity and sleep than day- and night-shift workers. For eating patterns, compared to night- and rotating-shift, day-shift workers ate more frequently during work days. Night workers, however, consumed more calories at work relative to day and rotating workers. For physical activity and sleep, night-shift workers had the highest activity and least sleep on work days.

Conclusion: This pilot study utilized primarily objective measurement to examine shift workers' habits outside the laboratory. Although no association between BMI and eating patterns/activity/sleep was observed across groups, a small, homogeneous sample may have influenced this. Overall, shift work was associated with 1) increased calorie intake and higher-fat and -carbohydrate diets and 2) sleep deprivation. A larger, more diverse sample can participate in future studies that objectively measure shift workers' real-world habits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/jcr.199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7583716PMC
October 2020

What are the Benefits and Risks Associated with Changing Foot Strike Pattern During Running? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Injury, Running Economy, and Biomechanics.

Sports Med 2020 May;50(5):885-917

La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Research Centre, School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, 3086, Australia.

Background: Running participation continues to increase. The ideal strike pattern during running is a controversial topic. Many coaches and therapists promote non-rearfoot strike (NRFS) running with a belief that it can treat and prevent injury, and improve running economy.

Objective: The aims of this review were to synthesise the evidence comparing NRFS with rearfoot strike (RFS) running patterns in relation to injury and running economy (primary aim), and biomechanics (secondary aim).

Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Consideration was given to within participant, between participant, retrospective, and prospective study designs.

Data Sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus.

Results: Fifty-three studies were included. Limited evidence indicated that NRFS running is retrospectively associated with lower reported rates of mild (standard mean difference (SMD), 95% CI 3.25, 2.37-4.12), moderate (3.65, 2.71-4.59) and severe (0.93, 0.32-1.55) repetitive stress injury. Studies prospectively comparing injury risk between strike patterns are lacking. Limited evidence indicated that running economy did not differ between habitual RFS and habitual NRFS runners at slow (10.8-11.0 km/h), moderate (12.6-13.5 km/h), and fast (14.0-15.0 km/h) speeds, and was reduced in the immediate term when an NRFS-running pattern was imposed on habitual RFS runners at slow (10.8 km/h; SMD = - 1.67, - 2.82 to - 0.52) and moderate (12.6 km/h; - 1.26, - 2.42 to - 0.10) speeds. Key biomechanical findings, consistently including both comparison between habitual strike patterns and following immediate transition from RFS to NRFS running, indicated that NRFS running was associated with lower average and peak vertical loading rate (limited-moderate evidence; SMDs = 0.72-2.15); lower knee flexion range of motion (moderate-strong evidence; SMDs = 0.76-0.88); reduced patellofemoral joint stress (limited evidence; SMDs = 0.63-0.68); and greater peak internal ankle plantar flexor moment (limited evidence; SMDs = 0.73-1.33).

Conclusion: The relationship between strike pattern and injury risk could not be determined, as current evidence is limited to retrospective findings. Considering the lack of evidence to support any improvements in running economy, combined with the associated shift in loading profile (i.e., greater ankle and plantarflexor loading) found in this review, changing strike pattern cannot be recommended for an uninjured RFS runner.

Prospero Registration: CRD42015024523.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40279-019-01238-yDOI Listing
May 2020

Bariatric Outcomes: Self-Management for Sustained Surgical Success: A Multicomponent Treatment for Dysregulated Overeating in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

J Addict Nurs 2018 Jan/Mar;29(1):32-42

Laura M. Anderson, PhD, and Thomas P. Chacko, MA, School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, State University of New York.

Binge eating disorder, food addiction, and dysregulated overeating are common among people with severe obesity and prevalent among bariatric surgery populations. These problematic eating habits share commonalities with other addictions. Effective, holistic self-management is needed to promote long-term weight loss and psychosocial adjustment among patients who are severely obese who undergo surgery, especially those with clinically remarkable levels of binge eating, food addiction, or dysregulated overeating.This article aims to briefly review binge eating disorder, food addiction, and obesity-as well as issues surrounding surgery for individuals who are severely obese-and introduce the Bariatric Outcomes: Self-management for Sustained Surgical Success (BOSSSS) program. The BOSSSS program is holistic, skill based, and designed to promote weight loss, prevent weight regain, and improve well-being in patients with severe obesity with a history of bariatric surgery.Preliminary survey data suggest that bariatric surgery patients report a lack of skill-based emotional and behavioral support designed to help them over the long term. The BOSSSS program is rooted in self-determination theory, integrating mobile health technology across program components. Self-determination theory-based interventions are personalized and encourage autonomy, competence, and social support among participating patients and providers. The behavioral self-regulation training within BOSSSS is energy balance self-monitoring and titration. Emotional self-regulation is addressed via a specialized version of dialectical behavior skills therapy, emphasizing promotion of coping skills and use of adaptive, healthy substances in immediate environments. The BOSSSS program has been well received by patients and could be implemented by nurses and other health professionals with minimal support.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JAN.0000000000000210DOI Listing
December 2018

A Systematic Examination of Food Intake and Adaptation to the Food Environment by Refugees Settled in the United States.

Adv Nutr 2016 11 15;7(6):1066-1079. Epub 2016 Nov 15.

School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.

The United States is the largest refugee resettlement country in the world. Refugees may face health-related challenges after resettlement in the United States, including higher rates of chronic diseases due to problems such as language barriers and difficulty adapting to new food environments. However, reported refugee diet challenges varied, and no systematic examination has been reported. This study examined refugee food intake pre- and postresettlement in the United States and differences in intake across various refugee groups. We systematically reviewed relevant studies that reported on refugee food intake and adaptation to the US food environment. We searched PubMed for literature published between January 1985 and April 2015, including cross-sectional and prospective studies. Eighteen studies met inclusion criteria. Limited research has been conducted, and most studies were based on small convenience samples. In general, refugees increased meat and egg consumption after resettling in the United States. Changes in refugee intake of vegetables, fruits, and dairy products varied by socioeconomic status, food insecurity, past food deprivation experience, length of stay in the United States, region of origin, and age. South Asians were more likely to maintain traditional diets, and increased age was associated with more conservative and traditional diets. Despite the abundance of food in the United States, postresettlement refugees reported difficulty in finding familiar or healthy foods. More research with larger samples and follow-up data are needed to study how refugees adapt to the US food environment and what factors may influence their food- and health-related outcomes. The work could inform future interventions to promote healthy eating and living among refugees and help to reduce health disparities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/an.115.011452DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5105033PMC
November 2016

A Systematic Examination of Food Intake and Adaptation to the Food Environment by Refugees Settled in the United States.

Adv Nutr 2016 11 15;7(6):1066-1079. Epub 2016 Nov 15.

School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.

The United States is the largest refugee resettlement country in the world. Refugees may face health-related challenges after resettlement in the United States, including higher rates of chronic diseases due to problems such as language barriers and difficulty adapting to new food environments. However, reported refugee diet challenges varied, and no systematic examination has been reported. This study examined refugee food intake pre- and postresettlement in the United States and differences in intake across various refugee groups. We systematically reviewed relevant studies that reported on refugee food intake and adaptation to the US food environment. We searched PubMed for literature published between January 1985 and April 2015, including cross-sectional and prospective studies. Eighteen studies met inclusion criteria. Limited research has been conducted, and most studies were based on small convenience samples. In general, refugees increased meat and egg consumption after resettling in the United States. Changes in refugee intake of vegetables, fruits, and dairy products varied by socioeconomic status, food insecurity, past food deprivation experience, length of stay in the United States, region of origin, and age. South Asians were more likely to maintain traditional diets, and increased age was associated with more conservative and traditional diets. Despite the abundance of food in the United States, postresettlement refugees reported difficulty in finding familiar or healthy foods. More research with larger samples and follow-up data are needed to study how refugees adapt to the US food environment and what factors may influence their food- and health-related outcomes. The work could inform future interventions to promote healthy eating and living among refugees and help to reduce health disparities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/an.115.011452DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5105033PMC
November 2016

A Systematic Examination of Food Intake and Adaptation to the Food Environment by Refugees Settled in the United States.

Adv Nutr 2016 11 15;7(6):1066-1079. Epub 2016 Nov 15.

School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.

The United States is the largest refugee resettlement country in the world. Refugees may face health-related challenges after resettlement in the United States, including higher rates of chronic diseases due to problems such as language barriers and difficulty adapting to new food environments. However, reported refugee diet challenges varied, and no systematic examination has been reported. This study examined refugee food intake pre- and postresettlement in the United States and differences in intake across various refugee groups. We systematically reviewed relevant studies that reported on refugee food intake and adaptation to the US food environment. We searched PubMed for literature published between January 1985 and April 2015, including cross-sectional and prospective studies. Eighteen studies met inclusion criteria. Limited research has been conducted, and most studies were based on small convenience samples. In general, refugees increased meat and egg consumption after resettling in the United States. Changes in refugee intake of vegetables, fruits, and dairy products varied by socioeconomic status, food insecurity, past food deprivation experience, length of stay in the United States, region of origin, and age. South Asians were more likely to maintain traditional diets, and increased age was associated with more conservative and traditional diets. Despite the abundance of food in the United States, postresettlement refugees reported difficulty in finding familiar or healthy foods. More research with larger samples and follow-up data are needed to study how refugees adapt to the US food environment and what factors may influence their food- and health-related outcomes. The work could inform future interventions to promote healthy eating and living among refugees and help to reduce health disparities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/an.115.011452DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5105033PMC
November 2016

Biomechanical consequences of epiphytism in intertidal macroalgae.

J Exp Biol 2014 Apr 5;217(Pt 7):1167-74. Epub 2013 Dec 5.

Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research Centre, University of British Columbia, 6270 University Boulevard, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.

Epiphytic algae grow on other algae rather than hard substrata, perhaps circumventing competition for space in marine ecosystems. Aquatic epiphytes are widely thought to negatively affect host fitness; it is also possible that epiphytes benefit from associating with hosts. This study explored the biomechanical costs and benefits of the epiphytic association between the intertidal brown algal epiphyte Soranthera ulvoidea and its red algal host Odonthalia floccosa. Drag on epiphytized and unepiphytized hosts was measured in a recirculating water flume. A typical epiphyte load increased drag on hosts by ~50%, increasing dislodgment risk of epiphytized hosts compared with hosts that did not have epiphytes. However, epiphytes were more likely to dislodge from hosts than hosts were to dislodge from the substratum, suggesting that drag added by epiphytes may not be mechanically harmful to hosts if epiphytes break first. Concomitantly, epiphytes experienced reduced flow when attached to hosts, perhaps allowing them to grow larger or live in more wave-exposed areas. Biomechanical interactions between algal epiphytes and hosts are complex and not necessarily negative, which may partially explain the evolution and persistence of epiphytic relationships.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/jeb.088955DOI Listing
April 2014

A randomized pilot trial of an integrated school-worksite weight control program.

Health Psychol 2014 Nov 29;33(11):1421-5. Epub 2013 Jul 29.

Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo.

Objective: Worksite provision of paid time off for parent participation in a school-based healthy weight program may improve treatment adherence and outcomes. The current pilot study examined whether parents who received worksite support for attendance at a school-based healthy weight program would attend more sessions, lose more weight, and make healthier changes in home food environments than parents who did not receive worksite support.

Method: Thirty-eight urban, low-income African American and Mexican American mothers of kindergartners were randomized to an integrated school-parent-worksite program that targeted healthy home food environments and energy balance self-monitoring or the identical school-based program without worksite support. Ten sessions were delivered to parent participants during afterschool hours. Process measures included session attendance and energy balance log completion. Outcome measures included parent body mass index (BMI) change, child BMI z-score change, and home food inventory (HFI) score changes over 12 months.

Results: RESULTS showed better weight change for parents (i.e., BMI unit reduction of 1.4 vs. 0.3 in comparison group, p = .001), increased parental attendance, and improvements in the home food environment when parents received paid time off from their worksite for their participation in the healthy weight program. Child weight change was also observed despite no direct contact with children.

Conclusions: The current pilot study provides support for the hypothesis that worksite support for school-based interventions may improve health outcomes that depend on parental involvement. Removing barriers to attendance in a healthy weight program resulted in improved treatment adherence and outcomes in low-income, minority parents and children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000007DOI Listing
November 2014

Geographic differences in physical education and adolescent BMI: have legal mandates made a difference?

J Sch Nurs 2013 Feb 18;29(1):52-60. Epub 2012 Jul 18.

Department of Counseling, School, & Educational Psychology, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, NY, USA.

The school environment is an ideal setting for healthy weight programming with adolescents. The federal government has reinforced the importance of school-based health promotion. The current study examined the preliminary influence of the 2006 school wellness policy requirement of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act (CNWICRA) on adolescent Body Mass Index (BMI) and physical education participation. Nationally representative data from the 2003 and 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBSS) were used. The authors examined BMI percentile and physical education participation based on survey year and geographic region. Results suggest a slight decrease in BMI with no changes in physical education participation. A main effect for geographic region was found for both physical education participation and BMI percentile, while a geographic region-by-survey year interaction was discovered when analyzing BMI percentiles. Results suggest a need for continued investigation and may inform future healthy weight programming and geographically tailored wellness policies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1059840512453602DOI Listing
February 2013

Geographic differences in physical education and adolescent BMI: have legal mandates made a difference?

J Sch Nurs 2013 Feb 18;29(1):52-60. Epub 2012 Jul 18.

Department of Counseling, School, & Educational Psychology, University at Buffalo, SUNY, Buffalo, NY, USA.

The school environment is an ideal setting for healthy weight programming with adolescents. The federal government has reinforced the importance of school-based health promotion. The current study examined the preliminary influence of the 2006 school wellness policy requirement of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act (CNWICRA) on adolescent Body Mass Index (BMI) and physical education participation. Nationally representative data from the 2003 and 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey (YRBSS) were used. The authors examined BMI percentile and physical education participation based on survey year and geographic region. Results suggest a slight decrease in BMI with no changes in physical education participation. A main effect for geographic region was found for both physical education participation and BMI percentile, while a geographic region-by-survey year interaction was discovered when analyzing BMI percentiles. Results suggest a need for continued investigation and may inform future healthy weight programming and geographically tailored wellness policies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1059840512453602DOI Listing
February 2013
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