Publications by authors named "Laura Kolbe"

7 Publications

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Meta-analytic structural equation modeling made easy: A tutorial and web application for one-stage MASEM.

Res Synth Methods 2021 May 27. Epub 2021 May 27.

Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore.

Meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) refers to fitting structural equation models (such as path models or factor models) to eta-analytic data. Currently, fitting MASEMs may be challenging for researchers that are not accustomed to working with R software and packages. Therefore, we developed webMASEM; a web application for MASEM. This app implements the one-stage MASEM approach, and allows users to apply MASEM in a user-friendly way. The aim of this article is to provide a tutorial on one-stage MASEM and a practical guide to webMASEM. We will pay specific attention to how the data should be structured and prepared for webMASEM, because mistakes in this step may lead to faulty results without receiving an error message. The use of webMASEM is illustrated with an analysis of a meta-analytic path model in which the path coefficients are moderated by a study-level variable, a meta-analytic factor model in which the factor loadings are moderated by a study-level variable, and a meta-analytic panel model in which the effects are moderated by a study-level variable. All used datafiles and R-codes are available online. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jrsm.1498DOI Listing
May 2021

Use of virtual reality in the inpatient rehabilitation of COVID-19 patients.

Gen Hosp Psychiatry 2021 Apr 29;71:76-81. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY; Division of Hospital Medicine, Ascension Saint Thomas Hospital West, Nashville, TN.

Introduction: Use of virtual reality (VR) in healthcare has expanded in recent years. The challenges faced by patients with prolonged COVID-19-related hospitalizations - social isolation, disability, neurologic sequelae, adjustment-related anxiety, depression, and stress - may be mitigated by the novel use of VR as one modality of a comprehensive rehabilitation plan. This descriptive study aimed to understand patient satisfaction and perceived benefit of virtual reality on a COVID-19 recovery unit, as well as the logistical and operational feasibility of providing VR content for patients and staff.

Materials And Methods: During the COVID-19 surge in New York City in 2020, the COVID-19 Recovery Unit (CRU) of a large academic hospital invited patients and staff to participate in VR sessions with three categories of experience: (1) Guided meditation, (2) Exploration of natural environments, (3) Cognitive stimulation games. Patients and staff were surveyed about satisfaction and perceived benefit.

Results: 13 patients and 11 staff were surveyed, with median patient satisfaction scores of 9 out of 10, with ten representing "extremely satisfied," and median staff satisfaction scores of 10. 13/13 patients answered "yes" to recommending the therapy to others, and 12/13 answered "yes" to perceived enhancement of their treatment. 11/11 staff answered "yes" to recommending the therapy to others, and 11/11 answered "yes" to perceived enhancement of their wellbeing.

Discussion: A VR program implemented on a COVID-19 rehabilitation unit for patients and healthcare providers was rated as highly satisfactory with perceived benefit by survey respondents. Participants commented that the use of VR was useful in coping with isolation and loneliness, and could be implemented within the context of clinical care for COVID-19 patients as part of a comprehensive rehabilitation model. The use of VR was also logistically and operationally feasible on the CRU. Future work to compare benefits of VR to standard neuropsychological rehabilitation is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2021.04.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8081572PMC
April 2021

On Gifts and Heroes.

Authors:
Laura Kolbe

J Gen Intern Med 2021 04 19;36(4):1058-1060. Epub 2021 Jan 19.

Division of General Internal Medicine, Hospital Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th street, Box 331 NY, New York, NY, USA.

The language of gratitude and of heroism, pervasive in public discourse about essential workers, is well-intended but belies a problematic blurring of the difference between gifts, contracts, and professionalism. "Heroism," a term frequently invoked by society, usually describes the giving of oneself beyond reasonable boundaries. This noble concept affirms our essential connections to each other. However, labeling someone's labor as a gift can make givers feel obligated exceed both contracts and professionalism. Contracts define the boundaries of expected work for expected compensation. Like heroism, professionalism in healthcare implies undertaking duties to others beyond the contractual. Careless use of these words, however, can lead to negative consequences. Gifts and heroism are best applied to special needs in special circumstances. Professionalism goes beyond special circumstances to address ongoing commitments to others. When the language of gifts, heroism, or professionalism are used to promote the ongoing performance of dangerous, excessive work, however, they become instruments of injustice and burnout. The experiences of the COVID pandemic can help identify the proper scope of gift-giving, heroism and professionalism - which cement our social bonds - while avoiding misuses of these terms, in order to improve the safety and fairness of the work environment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11606-020-06435-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7815277PMC
April 2021

Identification of Racial Inequities in Access to Specialized Inpatient Heart Failure Care at an Academic Medical Center.

Circ Heart Fail 2019 11 29;12(11):e006214. Epub 2019 Oct 29.

Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, and Department of Medicine (E.F..L.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.

Background: Racial inequities for patients with heart failure (HF) have been widely documented. HF patients who receive cardiology care during a hospital admission have better outcomes. It is unknown whether there are differences in admission to a cardiology or general medicine service by race. This study examined the relationship between race and admission service, and its effect on 30-day readmission and mortality Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study from September 2008 to November 2017 at a single large urban academic referral center of all patients self-referred to the emergency department and admitted to either the cardiology or general medicine service with a principal diagnosis of HF, who self-identified as white, black, or Latinx. We used multivariable generalized estimating equation models to assess the relationship between race and admission to the cardiology service. We used Cox regression to assess the association between race, admission service, and 30-day readmission and mortality.

Results: Among 1967 unique patients (66.7% white, 23.6% black, and 9.7% Latinx), black and Latinx patients had lower rates of admission to the cardiology service than white patients (adjusted rate ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.98, for black; adjusted rate ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97 for Latinx). Female sex and age >75 years were also independently associated with lower rates of admission to the cardiology service. Admission to the cardiology service was independently associated with decreased readmission within 30 days, independent of race.

Conclusions: Black and Latinx patients were less likely to be admitted to cardiology for HF care. This inequity may, in part, drive racial inequities in HF outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.119.006214DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183732PMC
November 2019

Using restricted factor analysis to select anchor items and detect differential item functioning.

Behav Res Methods 2019 02;51(1):138-151

Department of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Restricted factor analysis (RFA) is a powerful method to test for uniform differential item functioning (DIF), but it may require empirically selecting anchor items to prevent inflated Type I error rates. We conducted a simulation study to compare two empirical anchor-selection strategies: a one-step rank-based strategy and an iterative selection procedure. Unlike the iterative procedure, the rank-based strategy had a low risk and degree of contamination within the empirically selected anchor set, even with small samples. To detect nonuniform DIF, RFA requires an interaction effect with the latent factor. The latent moderated structural equations (LMS) method has been applied to RFA and has revealed inflated Type I error rates. We propose using product indicators (PI) as a more widely available alternative to measure the latent interaction. A simulation study, involving several sample-size conditions and magnitudes of uniform and nonuniform DIF, revealed that PI obtained similar power but lower Type I error rates, as compared to LMS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13428-018-1151-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6420445PMC
February 2019

Parent feeding behavior and child appetite: associations depend on feeding style.

Int J Eat Disord 2014 Nov 27;47(7):705-9. Epub 2014 Jun 27.

Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objective: Eating behavior traits measured in early life predict eating behavior and weight trajectories later in development, and may be associated with certain parental feeding behaviors. Our goal was to investigate the relationship between a range of feeding behaviors, and preschoolers' appetitive traits.

Method: Four hundred thirty-nine parents of UK 3-5 year olds completed scales measuring authoritarian vs. authoritative forms of limiting (Restriction vs. Monitoring) and promoting (Pressuring vs. Prompting) intake, as well as Emotional and Instrumental Feeding. Parents also completed scales measuring child Food responsiveness and Satiety responsiveness. Child BMI z-scores were calculated based on measured heights and weights.

Results: Parental Restriction was significantly associated with greater child Food responsiveness (p < .001), but parental Monitoring was not. Parental Pressuring was significantly associated with greater child Satiety responsiveness (p < .001), while parental Prompting was not. Parental Instrumental and Emotional feeding were both associated with greater child Food responsiveness (p < .001). All relationships were independent of child BMI z-score.

Discussion: Prospective data are needed to determine whether the parent-child feeding relationships identified here promote, or protect against, the development of eating pathology in children. However, our results suggest that cross-sectional associations depend on the style (e.g., authoritarian vs. authoritative), as well as the type of feeding behavior measured.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22324DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4211951PMC
November 2014

Supermarket discounts of low-energy density foods: effects on purchasing, food intake, and body weight.

Obesity (Silver Spring) 2013 12 5;21(12):E542-8. Epub 2013 Jul 5.

New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center, Department of Medicine, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10025; Department of Psychology, Touro College, New York, NY 10010.

Objective: To assess the effects of a 50% discount on low-energy density (ED) fruits and vegetables (F&V), bottled water, and diet sodas on shoppers' purchasing, food intake, and body weight.

Design And Methods: A randomized, controlled trial was conducted at two Manhattan supermarkets, in which a 4-week baseline period (no discounts) preceded an 8-week intervention period (50% discount), and a 4-week follow-up period (no discounts). Twenty-four hour dietary recall, as well as body weight and body composition measures were obtained every 4 weeks. Participants (n = 47, 33f; 14m) were overweight and obese (BMI ≥ 25) shoppers.

Results: Purchasing of F&V during intervention was greater in the discount group than in the control group (P < 0.0001). Purchasing of these items by the discount group relative to the control group during follow-up was reduced from intervention (P = 0.002), but still remained higher than during baseline (P = 0.01), indicating a partially sustained effect. Intake of F&V increased from baseline to intervention in the discount group relative to the control group (P = 0.037) and was sustained during follow-up. Body weight change did not differ significantly between groups, although post hoc analysis indicated a change within the discount group (-1.1 kg, P = 0.006) but not within the control group.

Conclusions: Discounts of low-ED F&V led to increased purchasing and intake of those foods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.20484DOI Listing
December 2013