Publications by authors named "Laura Carreón-Palau"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sterol Composition of Sponges, Cnidarians, Arthropods, Mollusks, and Echinoderms from the Deep Northwest Atlantic: A Comparison with Shallow Coastal Gulf of Mexico.

Mar Drugs 2020 Nov 27;18(12). Epub 2020 Nov 27.

Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Marine Lab Rd., St. John's, NL A1C 5S7, Canada.

Triterpenoid biosynthesis is generally anaerobic in bacteria and aerobic in Eukarya. The major class of triterpenoids in bacteria, the hopanoids, is different to that in Eukarya, the lanostanoids, and their 4,4,14-demethylated derivatives, sterols. In the deep sea, the prokaryotic contribution to primary productivity has been suggested to be higher because local environmental conditions prevent classic photosynthetic processes from occurring. Sterols have been used as trophic biomarkers because primary producers have different compositions, and they are incorporated in primary consumer tissues. In the present study, we inferred food supply to deep sea, sponges, cnidarians, mollusks, crustaceans, and echinoderms from euphotic zone production which is driven by phytoplankton eukaryotic autotrophy. Sterol composition was obtained by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Moreover, we compared the sterol composition of three phyla (i.e., Porifera, Cnidaria, and Echinodermata) collected between a deep and cold-water region and a shallow tropical area. We hypothesized that the sterol composition of shallow tropical benthic organisms would better reflect their photoautotrophic sources independently of the taxonomy. Shallow tropical sponges and cnidarians from environments showed plant and zooxanthellae sterols in their tissues, while their deep-sea counterparts showed phytoplankton and zooplankton sterols. In contrast, echinoids, a class of echinoderms, the most complex phylum along with hemichordates and chordates (deuterostomes), did not show significant differences in their sterol profile, suggesting that cholesterol synthesis is present in deuterostomes other than chordates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md18120598DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7761341PMC
November 2020

Involvement of OpsLTP1 from Opuntia streptacantha in abiotic stress adaptation and lipid metabolism.

Funct Plant Biol 2019 08;46(9):816-829

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR), Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 195, Col. Playa Palo de Santa Rita Apdo, Postal 128, 23096 La Paz, B.C.S., México; and Corresponding author. Email:

Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) exhibit the ability to transfer lipids between membranes in vitro, and have been implicated in diverse physiological processes associated to plant growth, reproduction, development, biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, their mode of action is not yet fully understood. To explore the functions of the OpsLTP1 gene encoding a LTP from cactus pear Opuntia streptacantha Lem., we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. plants to overexpress OpsLTP1 and contrasted our results with the loss-of-function mutant ltp3 from A. thaliana under abiotic stress conditions. The ltp3 mutant seeds showed impaired germination under salt and osmotic treatments, in contrast to OpsLTP1 overexpressing lines that displayed significant increases in germination rate. Moreover, stress recovery assays showed that ltp3 mutant seedlings were more sensitive to salt and osmotic treatments than wild-type plants suggesting that AtLTP3 is required for stress-induced responses, while the OpsLTP1 overexpressing line showed no significant differences. In addition, OpsLTP1 overexpressing and ltp3 mutant seeds stored lower amount of total lipids compared with wild-type seeds, showing changes primarily on 16C and 18C fatty acids. However, ltp3 mutant also lead changes in lipid profile and no over concrete lipids which may suggest a compensatory activation of other LTPs. Interestingly, linoleic acid (18:2ω6) was consistently increased in neutral, galactoglycerolipids and phosphoglycerolipids of OpsLTP1 overexpressing line indicating a role of OpsLTP1 in the modulation of lipid composition in A. thaliana.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/FP18280DOI Listing
August 2019

Corrigendum to "Urban sewage lipids in the suspended particulate matter of a coral reef under river influence in the South West Gulf of Mexico" [Water Res. 123 (2017) 192-205].

Water Res 2017 12;126:530

Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Pesquerías, Universidad Veracruzana, Calle Hidalgo 617, Colonia Río Jamapa, Boca del Río, Veracruz, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.10.026DOI Listing
December 2017

Urban sewage lipids in the suspended particulate matter of a coral reef under river influence in the South West Gulf of Mexico.

Water Res 2017 10 22;123:192-205. Epub 2017 Jun 22.

Instituto de Ciencias Marinas y Pesquerías, Universidad Veracruzana, Calle Hidalgo 617, Colonia Río Jamapa, Boca del Río, Veracruz, Mexico.

Nutritional quality of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and the degree of human fecal pollution in the largest coral reef system in the southwest Gulf of Mexico were evaluated using lipid classes, fatty acids (FA) and sterols in the dry and rainy seasons. High proportions of triacylglycerols and saturated and monounsaturated FA were detected in the SPM however it was considered poor quality because it had low proportions of highly unsaturated FA which can be used to determine production of marine biogenic material of dietary value to pelagic and benthic organisms. Urban sewage organic carbon was traced with coprostanol. The reference value of coprostanol from the point source of pollution was set using two samples from a sewage treatment plant processing waste from >140,000 people near the coral reef system, and it was contrasted with one river station and nine marine stations including six coral reefs. The concentration of coprostanol in the SPM was 3621 ± 98 ng L comprising 26% of total sterols. During the dry season, the river was contaminated upstream with human feces as evidenced by coprostanol at 1823 ng L, the 5β-coprostanol: cholesterol ratio at 0.5, and 5β-coprostanol: [5α-cholestanol+5β-coprostanol] at 0.7. In contrast, marine stations had concentrations of coprostanol lower than a suggested regulation limit for tropical marine coastal waters (30 ng L), ranging between 6 and 28 ng L. During the rainy season a dilution effect was detected in the river, however significantly higher concentrations of coprostanol in the marine stations were detected ranging between 15 and 215 ng L, higher than the tentative tropical regulation range (30-100 ng L). Among the reefs, the nearshore one, 14.3 km from the treatment plant, was more exposed to human-fecal pollution, and offshore reefs, >17.3 km from the plant, had a lower degree of contamination. Finally, only three stations were clearly uncontaminated during both seasons including two reefs in the south located 21.8 and 35.6 km from the plant, with no presence of coprostanol. Contamination in the rainy season likely comes from a village with untreated sewage located 9.3-32 km from the reefs, and from the second largest Mexican river flowing into the Gulf of Mexico which has a watershed covering three states with lower than average sewage treatment. Inclusion of coprostanol monitoring could be a key factor in the management of this coral reef system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.06.061DOI Listing
October 2017