Publications by authors named "Laura Cannella"

52 Publications

Health-related quality of life in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia: a systematic literature review.

Expert Rev Hematol 2021 Jul 26;14(7):645-654. Epub 2021 Jul 26.

Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases (GIMEMA), Data Center and Health Outcomes Research Unit, Rome, Italy.

: Remarkable advances have been made in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) research over the past decades and many patients can now also be cured without traditional chemotherapy. Therefore, the assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and other types of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) is highly relevant in the current APL treatment landscape.: A systematic literature review was performed to identify APL studies assessing HRQoL that were published over the last 15 years. Eligible studies were evaluated on a predetermined data extraction form including information on the study design, PRO measure used, as well patient characteristics and summary of HRQoL findings. For descriptive purposes, selected studies were grouped and discussed based on the type of treatment: standard chemotherapy only versus those also including more recent targeted arsenic trioxide (ATO)-based strategies.: Inclusion of HRQoL in APL research was important to better understand the benefit-risk profile of intravenous ATO compared to traditional chemotherapy. While some information on HRQoL and symptoms in APL survivors treated with standard chemotherapy is available, the long-term effects of ATO therapy on patients' HRQoL are largely unknown. Additionally, future studies are needed to evaluate the potential advantages of oral ATO over intravenous administration.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17474086.2021.1943352DOI Listing
July 2021

Quality of patient-reported outcome reporting in randomised controlled trials of haematological malignancies according to international quality standards: a systematic review.

Lancet Haematol 2020 Dec;7(12):e892-e901

Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases, Data Center and Health Outcomes Research Unit, Rome, Italy. Electronic address:

Patient-reported outcome (PRO) endpoints are increasingly considered for inclusion in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving patients with haematological malignancies. The aim of our systematic review was to investigate the quality of PRO reporting across these RCTs. We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and PubMed for English language articles published between Jan 1, 2014, and Jan 31, 2019. Eligible articles were RCTs of cancer-directed therapy in adult patients with haematological malignancies that reported on PRO measures in the primary publication or in a subsequent publication, with a comparison of PROs among treatment groups. A total of 3678 records were assessed, and 71 RCTs, enrolling 24 701 patients, were included in our systematic review. Most RCTs (n=65 [92%]) had PRO measures as a secondary or exploratory endpoint. A PRO hypothesis and relevant PRO domains were specified in 36 (51%) RCTs. Statistical approaches for dealing with missing data were documented in 26 (37%) RCTs. Quality of PRO reporting was higher in RCTs citing the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials Statement-PRO extension (CONSORT-PRO) than in those not citing this checklist, as evidenced by the International Society for Quality of Life Research score (median score in studies citing the CONSORT-PRO extension [n=4] was 89 [IQR 75-94] vs 61 [44-78] in those not citing this extension). Independent factors significantly associated with higher reporting included having PROs as a primary endpoint (p=0·008) and the presence of a subsequent publication on PROs (p<0·0001). International guidelines for designing, reporting, and analysing PRO data are now available to further improve overall study quality. Our findings can help investigators to focus on key aspects most in need of attention when reporting PROs in future trials of haematological malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3026(20)30292-1DOI Listing
December 2020

Impact of the type of anthracycline and of stem cell transplantation in younger patients with acute myeloid leukaemia: Long-term follow up of a phase III study.

Am J Hematol 2020 07 17;95(7):749-758. Epub 2020 Apr 17.

EORTC Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium.

We provide a long-term evaluation of patients enrolled in the EORTC/GIMEMA AML-10 trial which included a total of 2157 patients, 15-60 years old, randomized to receive either daunorubicin (DNR, 50 mg/m ), mitoxantrone (MXR, 12 mg/m ), or idarubicin (IDA, 10 mg/m ) in addition to standard-dose cytarabine and etoposide for induction chemotherapy and intermediate dose cytarabine for consolidation. Younger patients who reached complete remission with complete (CR) or incomplete (CRi) recovery were then scheduled to receive an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). That was if they had a HLA-identical sibling donor; in all other cases, an autologous HSCT had to be administered. At an 11-year median follow-up, the 5-year, 10-year and 15-year overall survival (OS) rates were 33.2%, 30.1% and 28.0%, respectively. No significant difference between the three randomized groups regarding OS was observed (P = .38). In young patients, 15-45 years old, no treatment difference (P = .89) regarding OS was observed, while in patients 46-60 years old, MXR and IDA groups had a trend for a longer OS as compared to the DNR group (P = .029). Among younger patients without a favorable MRC cytogenetic risk subgroup who achieved a CR/CRi after induction chemotherapy, those with a HLA-identical sibling donor had higher 10-year and 15-year OS rates than those without. In older patients who reached CR/CRi, the long-term outcomes of those with or without a donor was similar. In conclusion, long-term outcomes of the study confirmed similar OS in the three randomized groups in the whole cohort of patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.25795DOI Listing
July 2020

How should we assess patient-reported outcomes in the onco-hematology clinic?

Curr Opin Support Palliat Care 2018 12;12(4):522-529

Innsbruck Institute of Patient-centered Outcome Research (IIPCOR), Innsbruck, Austria.

Purpose Of Review: The improvement of clinical outcomes in hematologic malignancies has paved the way for a more systematic patient-reported outcomes (PROs) assessment in routine clinical practice. PROs help to narrow the gap between patients' and healthcare professionals' view of patient health and treatment success. This review outlines key aspects of planning and performing PRO assessments in daily routine such as the selection of PRO instruments, electronic PRO data collection, and the presentation and interpretation of PRO results.

Recent Findings: A substantial body of literature has demonstrated that careful planning, adequate logistics, and elaborate methodology allow to successfully integrate the patients' experience in routine care. Several examples exist of the clinical benefits of systematically collecting PRO information in daily care of patients with solid tumors. These include improved patient-physician communication, better symptom management, and, in patients with advanced disease, also fewer hospitalizations and prolonged survival. However, sparse evidence based data are available for patients with onco-hematologic diseases.

Summary: Data collected through PRO instruments provide unique information that complements traditional clinical examinations and may help improving patients' management in clinical practice. Major efforts are now needed to implement PRO instruments in daily practice of patients with hematologic malignancies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SPC.0000000000000386DOI Listing
December 2018

A prospective observational study to assess clinical decision-making, prognosis, quality of life and satisfaction with care in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: the CLARITY study protocol.

Health Qual Life Outcomes 2018 Jun 18;16(1):127. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Institute of Hematology Seragnoli, DIMES, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Background: Treatment decision-making in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) is challenging for a number of reasons including, the heterogeneity of disease at relapse and the number of possible therapeutic approaches. This study broadly aims to generate new evidence-based data to facilitate clinical decision-making in RRMM patients. The primary objective is to investigate the prognostic value of patient self-reported fatigue severity for overall survival.

Methods: This multicenter prospective observational study will consecutively enroll 312 patients with multiple myeloma who have received at least 1 prior line of therapy and are considered as RRMM according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) criteria. Eligible RRMM participants will be adults (≥ 18 years old) patients and will be enrolled irrespective of comorbidities and performance status. At the time of study inclusion, data to calculate the frailty score are to be available. Patients will be followed up for 30 months and patient-reported outcome (PRO) assessment is planned at baseline and thereafter at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The following PRO validated questionnaires will be used: the European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), the EORTC QLQ-MY20 and the EORTC QLQ-INFO25. Satisfaction with care and preference for involvement in treatment decisions will also be evaluated. Clinical, laboratory and treatment related information will be prospectively collected in conjunction with pre scheduled PRO assessments. Cox regression analyses will be used to assess the prognostic value of baseline fatigue severity (EORTC QLQ-C30) and other patient-reported health-related quality of life parameters.

Discussion: Clinical decision-making in RRMM is a challenge and outcome prediction is also an important aspect to enhance personalized treatment planning. Given the paucity of PRO data in this population, this prospective observational study aims to provide novel information that may facilitate patients' management in routine practice.

Trial Registration: This trial is registered as identifier NCT03190525 .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12955-018-0953-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6006751PMC
June 2018

Physicians' attitude towards selection of second line therapy with nilotinib and dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia patients.

Health Qual Life Outcomes 2017 Oct 18;15(1):204. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases (GIMEMA), Data Center and Health Outcomes Research Unit, Rome, Italy.

We investigated factors that physicians consider of most importance in the selection of second line tyrosine kinase inhibitors treatments (TKIs) in chronic myeloid leukemia patients (CML).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12955-017-0788-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5648464PMC
October 2017

The value of quality of life assessment in chronic myeloid leukemia patients receiving tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 2016 Dec;2016(1):170-179

Data Center and Health Outcomes Research Unit, Gruppo Italiano Malattie EMatologiche dell'Adulto (GIMEMA), Rome, Italy.

The development of the oral tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is one of the great triumphs of cancer research. Although the efficacy of TKIs has dramatically improved the disease-specific overall survival rate, the prevalence of CML is increasing worldwide. Currently, CML patients receive prolonged (even lifelong) treatment, and over the last decade, clinical decision making has become challenging. Therefore, consideration of the effects of TKI therapies on patients' quality of life (QoL) and symptom burden (ie, patient-reported outcomes [PROs]) is now critical to more robustly inform patient care and improve health care quality. Over the last 5 years, a number of studies have generated valuable PRO data, for example, on long-term QoL effects of imatinib therapy or symptom burden of patients switching from imatinib to second-generation TKIs. PRO findings are important, as they provide a unique patient perspective on the burden of the disease and treatments effects. We will review main evidence-based data on the use of PROs in clinical research and highlight the importance of methodological rigor of PRO assessment. Also, we will describe the potential value of using PRO assessment in routine clinical practice, for example, to facilitate timely management of side effects. Areas for future research will also be discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/asheducation-2016.1.170DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6142524PMC
December 2016

Pushing the boundaries of care in myelodysplastic syndromes: Physical exercise to improve fatigue and health-related quality of life outcomes.

Leuk Res 2016 10 9;49:36-7. Epub 2016 Aug 9.

Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases (GIMEMA), Data Center and Health Outcomes Research Unit, Rome, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2016.08.003DOI Listing
October 2016

Molecular investigation of coexistent chronic myeloid leukaemia and peripheral T-cell lymphoma - a case report.

Sci Rep 2015 Oct 6;5:14829. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

Department of Experimental Oncology European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm underlain by the formation of BCR-ABL1 - an aberrant tyrosine kinase - in the leukaemic blasts. Long-term survival rates in CML prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were dismal, albeit the incidence of secondary malignancies was higher than that of age-matched population. Current figures confirm the safety of TKIs with conflicting data concerning the increased risk of secondary tumours. We postulate that care has to be taken when distinguishing between coexisting, secondary-to-treatment and second in sequence, but independent tumourigenic events, in order to achieve an unbiased picture of the adverse effects of novel treatments. To illustrate this point, we present a case of a patient in which CML and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) coexisted, although the clinical presentation of the latter followed the achievement of major molecular response of CML to TKIs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep14829DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4594041PMC
October 2015

Health-related quality of life and symptom assessment in randomized controlled trials of patients with leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes: What have we learned?

Crit Rev Oncol Hematol 2015 Dec 1;96(3):542-54. Epub 2015 Aug 1.

Data Center and Health Outcomes Research Unit, Italian Group for Adult Hematologic Diseases (GIMEMA), Rome, Italy. Electronic address:

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and other patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are crucial for a comprehensive evaluation of treatment effectiveness. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a PRO endpoint conducted in patients with leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) was performed. Eligible studies were evaluated independently, according to a pre-defined coding scheme, by two reviewers. Thirteen RCTs, enrolling overall 3380 patients were identified. There were four RCTs involving acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), one with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), five with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and three with MDS. Six RCTs accurately documented PRO methodology assessment and were thus considered likely to robustly inform clinical decision-making. Of these, three RCTs dealt with AML, two with CLL, one with MDS. A growing number of RCTs in leukemia and MDS have included a PRO component in recent years. Inclusion of PROs in RCTs is feasible and can provide unique information to facilitate clinical decision-making.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.critrevonc.2015.07.012DOI Listing
December 2015

Enhanced and aberrant T cell trafficking following total body irradiation: a gateway to graft-versus-host disease?

Br J Haematol 2013 Sep 15;162(6):808-18. Epub 2013 Jul 15.

Stem Cell Biology Section, Department of Haematology, Imperial College, London, UK.

Pre-transplant conditioning regimens play a major role in triggering graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This study investigated the effect of irradiation on donor T cell trafficking to lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues by comparing the migration of carboxy-fluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labelled, naïve donor T lymphocytes in vivo in irradiated and non-irradiated syngeneic mice recipients. Recruitment of adoptively transferred naïve T cells to secondary lymphoid organs was increased in irradiated mice and naïve T cells also aberrantly localized to non-lymphoid tissues. Irradiation also induced aberrant effector memory T cell migration into lymph nodes and their localization to homing-privileged non-lymphoid sites, such as the gut. The presence of a minor histocompatibility mismatch further enhanced the aberrant accumulation of T cells in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissue, whilst their migratory pattern was not modified as compared to fully matched irradiated recipients. These effects correlated with decreased permeability of, and the secretion of chemotactic factors by the endothelium. Our findings are consistent with the possibility that excessive, dysregulated extravasation of T cells induced by irradiation promotes the development of GVHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.12472DOI Listing
September 2013

"Real-life" results of front-line treatment with Imatinib in older patients (≥ 65 years) with newly diagnosed chronic myelogenous leukemia.

Leuk Res 2010 Nov 13;34(11):1472-5. Epub 2010 Aug 13.

Department of Cellular Biotechnology and Hematology, University La Sapienza of Rome, Via Benevento 6, 00161 Rome, Italy.

The age role was evaluated in 117 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed CML at our Institution treated with front-line Imatinib from 9/02 to 3/08. Forty patients (34.1%) aged ≥ 65 years and 77 (65.9%) <65 years. Thirty-four older patients (85%) had at least 1 comorbidity versus 39 younger patients (50.6%) (p<0.001). Complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) was achieved in 34/40 older patients (85%) as compared to 69/77 younger patients (89.6%), without statistically significant differences. Severe (grades 3-4 WHO) hematological and extra-hematological toxicities were more common in older patients (p=0.02 and p=0.017, respectively). Rates of permanent Imatinib discontinuation and dose reduction to 300 mg or less were significantly higher in older patients (p=0.009 and p=0.001, respectively). In conclusion, Imatinib in older patients with newly diagnosed CML seems to have the same efficacy as in younger patients, but tends to be more toxic, leading to higher rates of discontinuation and dose reduction. To overcome this problem, future trials concerning best dosage in this subset of patients could be useful.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2010.07.001DOI Listing
November 2010

Deferasirox treatment interruption in a transfusion-requiring myelodysplastic patient led to loss of erythroid response.

Acta Haematol 2010 9;124(1):46-8. Epub 2010 Jul 9.

Department of Cellular Biotechnology and Hematology, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000314961DOI Listing
August 2010

Evaluation of comorbidities at diagnosis predicts outcome in myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

Leuk Res 2011 Feb 1;35(2):159-62. Epub 2010 Jul 1.

Department of Cellular Biotechnologies and Hematology, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.

Recent data suggest that proper assessment of comorbidities is useful to predict the outcome of MDS patients receiving allogeneic stem cell transplantation. However, the results obtained in this highly selected subset of patients cannot be applied to the whole MDS population. We evaluated the impact of comorbidities in 418 consecutive MDS patients diagnosed at our institute from 1992 to 2005. All patients were classified according to WHO criteria and all received only conservative and supportive treatment. One or more comorbidities were detected in 390 patients (93%) at the time of diagnosis, with a higher incidence in older patients. Cardiac diseases were the most frequent comorbidities (30%) while diabetes and correlated adverse events were the second cause of comorbidity (20%). We applied 3 comorbidity prognostic scores (CCI, HCT-CI and a MDS-CI score proposed by Della Porta et al.). According to CCI score, 253 patients had a score 0, 111 patients had a score 1 and 54 patients had a score >2. According to HCT-CI, 209 patients had a score 0, 105 patients had a score 1 and 106 patients had a score >2. With MDS-CI score, 288 patients had a score 0 and 129 patients had a score >1. We found a significant correlation between survival and stratification according to CCI and MDS-CI scores (p=0.01 and 0.02, respectively), but not according to HCT-CI score. The number of comorbidities as evaluated according to CCI was directly correlated to the development of RBC transfusion-dependency and was associated to a significantly higher risk of death not related to leukemic evolution (HR = 2.12, p ≤ 0.001). Conversely, higher risk of non-leukemic death did not correlate with higher transfusional requirement according to HCT-CI and MDS-CI scores (p = 0.3 and 0.43, respectively). As suggested by Della Porta et al., also in our experience the presence of cardiac, liver, renal, pulmonary diseases and solid tumours was found to independently affect the risk of death in a multivariable Cox regression analysis (p values from <0.01 to 0.004). In conclusion, assessment of comorbidities at diagnosis in MDS patients may improve the ability of therapeutic decisions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2010.06.005DOI Listing
February 2011

Refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia: analysis of prognostic factors and survival in 126 patients.

Leuk Lymphoma 2010 May;51(5):783-8

Department of Biotechnologies and Hematology, Via Benevento 6, 00161 Rome, Italy.

According to the revised WHO classification of 2008, dysplasia in > or = 10% of one bone marrow lineage and one cytopenia constitutes the low-risk category of unilineage cytopenia and unilineage dysplasia (UCUD). We retrospectively reclassified, according to WHO, low-risk MDS from our database and found 126 subjects with these features at diagnosis: 79 patients were categorized as refractory anemia (RA), 23 patients as refractory neutropenia (RN), and 24 as refractory thrombocytopenia (RT). We did not find differences between the three subgroups as regards sex, median age, and cytogenetic aberrations. Lower PMN count (0.8 x 10(9)/L) was observed in the RN category, as well as lower platelet count in the RT category (51 x 10(9)/L). Moreover, we found a lower rate of patients requiring RBC transfusions, during the disease course, in the RT category (45.8%) as compared to RA (62%) and RN (69%) groups (p = 0.05); a lower incidence of infections at diagnosis in the RT category (20.8%) compared to RA (32%) and RN (43%) categories (p = 0.03); and a higher incidence of hemorrhagic symptoms at diagnosis in the RT category (41.6%) and RN category (26%) as compared to the RA group (5%) (p = 0.001). Application of different scoring systems (Bournemouth and Spanish scores, WPSS) revealed a low OS in high-risk patients within the RT category, compared to RA and RN categories, although unlikely to reflect the consequences of low OS found in the former category. Statistically significant differences were also evidenced in the incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) evolution and overall survival: 7/79 (8%) patients with the RA category evolved to AML in a median time of 89 months, whereas 4/23 (17%) of the RN category and 1/24 (4%) of the RT category experienced disease progression, in a median time of 33.8 and 12.8 months, respectively (p = 0.03). The RT category had a lower overall survival (15.9 months) as compared to RA (48.2 months) and RN (35.9 months) categories (p < 0.001). In conclusion, in our study, application of the revised 2008 WHO classification confirmed the importance of separating patients with unilineage dysplasia for prognostic disease assessment; from our results it seems that the RT category has a worse outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428191003682759DOI Listing
May 2010
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